Personality Cafe banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Are there any ISTJ's who like Sales and/or are good at it? If so, do you have any tips to share? How do you stay motivated and on target? (Better yet, ahead of the game?)

Part of my job is Sales, and I struggle with this part the most. For me, every sale feels like a high stakes gamble, an uncertain result despite the taxing effort of meeting new people and really turning up the charm/chipperness to make instant "friends". Meeting all these new people and often get turned down really drains me in the introverted/extraverted sense. Even personally, I dislike talking to salesmen! (Though I now have more empathy for them lol.)

Any suggestions are much appreciated! Thanks! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,277 Posts
Are there any ISTJ's who like Sales and/or are good at it? If so, do you have any tips to share? How do you stay motivated and on target? (Better yet, ahead of the game?)

Part of my job is Sales, and I struggle with this part the most. For me, every sale feels like a high stakes gamble, an uncertain result despite the taxing effort of meeting new people and really turning up the charm/chipperness to make instant "friends". Meeting all these new people and often get turned down really drains me in the introverted/extraverted sense. Even personally, I dislike talking to salesmen! (Though I now have more empathy for them lol.)

Any suggestions are much appreciated! Thanks! :)
I haven't tried this for any extended time but I'd imagine an optimistic approach would help also it's helpful not taking it personally when getting turned down since it really isn't personal, I would reason to myself that they don't even know me.

I'd stay motivated if I figured it was a good challenge. But if it required things that I know I can't do well due to how my brain/mind works, I wouldn't want to keep working at it.

These things btw for me are anything requiring much brainstorming and anything requiring refined emotional manipulation. With sales, I'm not sure how much the latter would get in the way for me because I could imagine it doesn't need that much of it in that refined way but it could still be a disadvantage to a degree... depending on what kind of sales it is, maybe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,800 Posts
sales is probably the most boring job i can think of next to marketing and business, however i'm told i could sell and igloo to an eskimo.

for me it depends on what i'm selling. sales is easy if you are charming and sweet. you can convince anyone to buy anything, even things they don't need or like rol true story.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,277 Posts
sales is probably the most boring job i can think of next to marketing and business, however i'm told i could sell and igloo to an eskimo.

for me it depends on what i'm selling. sales is easy if you are charming and sweet. you can convince anyone to buy anything, even things they don't need or like rol true story.
Actually that makes me think, the best strategy depends on the person too who you are selling to. I would not buy anything just because the salesman is charming, it absolutely does not factor in for me when making decisions on what to buy :p. But if they have a way of figuring out what I really need - even if I myself don't yet know since I'm not familiar enough with the topic - and optionally having ability to pick the right product to sell to me based on that - now here manipulation may be involved since it may not actually be the perfect choice and I would pick up on this manipulation but other people may not - then it could be helpful and so I could take that into account for my decisions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,800 Posts
Actually that makes me think, the best strategy depends on the person too who you are selling to. I would not buy anything just because the salesman is charming, it absolutely does not factor in for me when making decisions on what to buy :p. But if they have a way of figuring out what I really need - even if I myself don't yet know since I'm not familiar enough with the topic - and optionally having ability to pick the right product to sell to me based on that - now here manipulation may be involved since it may not actually be the perfect choice and I would pick up on this manipulation but other people may not - then it could be helpful and so I could take that into account for my decisions.
i sold a vacuum cleaner one time to a man who didn't have any carpet in his home. it was a high tec vacuum designed for carpet only. i laughed all the way to the bank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,277 Posts
i sold a vacuum cleaner one time to a man who didn't have any carpet in his home. it was a high tec vacuum designed for carpet only. i laughed all the way to the bank.
Did you lie to him then about exactly what functionality the vacuum cleaner had?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,800 Posts
Did you lie to him then about exactly what functionality the vacuum cleaner had?
You don't have to lie to men to get what you want. :tongue: I think he was enjoying my company more than anything , he wasn't thinking with his brain sort of speak. Man who don't think with their brain in the head can do really dumb things. I didn't ask any questions, I took my money smiled and hoped he knew someone with carpet who he could sell it too. Who knows, maybe he made money off of it, it wasn't a piece of junk. He could have sold it for more than what he paid me for it. I hope that was the case because it was really awkward and the look on my face must of been priceless once he realized I knew he couldn't use it and was still wanting to take it off my hands. Dww so sweet, swallows (nervous ) and blushed , it was one of those passing moments that you never forget , you Intuitively know it went both ways. I think it was something that helped both of us on that day. I think he wanted me to remember him, I actually thought about him for sometime after the occasion and I'm pretty sure it was the same for him. I did remember and sharing it here many years later. I think he was an ESTP or ENTJ...can't decide.ROFLMAO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,277 Posts
You don't have to lie to men to get what you want. :tongue: I think he was enjoying my company more than anything , he wasn't thinking with his brain sort of speak. Man who don't think with their brain in the head can do really dumb things. I didn't ask any questions, I took my money smiled and hoped he knew someone with carpet who he could sell it too. Who knows, maybe he made money off of it, it wasn't a piece of junk. He could have sold it for more than what he paid me for it. I hope that was the case because it was really awkward and the look on my face must of been priceless once he realized I knew he couldn't use it and was still wanting to take it off my hands. Dww so sweet, swallows (nervous ) and blushed , it was one of those passing moments that you never forget , you Intuitively know it went both ways. I think it was something that helped both of us on that day. I think he wanted me to remember him, I actually thought about him for sometime after the occasion and I'm pretty sure it was the same for him. I did remember and sharing it here many years later. I think he was an ESTP or ENTJ...can't decide.ROFLMAO
ESTJ?

Btw, I would never react this way to a salesperson selling whatever, no matter how much they smile or try to charm or whatever. But then, I'm not a man.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sela

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,957 Posts
Are there any ISTJ's who like Sales and/or are good at it? If so, do you have any tips to share? How do you stay motivated and on target? (Better yet, ahead of the game?)

Part of my job is Sales, and I struggle with this part the most. For me, every sale feels like a high stakes gamble, an uncertain result despite the taxing effort of meeting new people and really turning up the charm/chipperness to make instant "friends". Meeting all these new people and often get turned down really drains me in the introverted/extraverted sense. Even personally, I dislike talking to salesmen! (Though I now have more empathy for them lol.)

Any suggestions are much appreciated! Thanks! :)
I'd be willing to give you the basics on a selling approach that is particularly effective. It's not all-inclusive, but it is pretty common as a needs-based selling approach. You can find lots of information about them online I am sure.

Step 1 - Introduction
Introduce yourself and ask for the customer's name. Repeat it back to them, it makes them feel like you were paying attention.

Step 2 - Building Rapport
Ask them open-ended questions about their visit to your store, what they are planning on doing today or next week or w/e, how the family is, whatever it takes to keep them talking. Critical: pay close attention to the mentioning of any problems they may have. You will need to empathize with your customer: "You're going to your grandmother's 80th birthday! How exciting!" -or- "It sounds like you've been having some trouble with your old television, that's no fun." Sometimes it's obvious, sometimes it's not. Continue until you have found something that you can sell to them. (In the latter case above, a new TV might be just the right thing!) If they already know what they are looking for, (say a boat, you can ask them questions about what they are going to do with their new boat. (this is suggestive and assumes they are going to buy))

Step 3 - Creating the Need
Using an empathy statement can be a good way to create a perceived need. "It sounds like the blurry image on your television is causing you eye strain." (customer agrees) "Let's take a look at some of the televisions with higher resolutions, they are easier to look at and cause less eye strain."

Step 4 - Making the Offer
Features tell, benefits sell. Nobody wants to hear about how this TV has a 179-degree viewing angle and a curved viewing surface and has a 4k resolution. They want to hear how it benefits them to OWN said TV. "With this TV, you'll get less headaches (benefit) because the higher resolution (feature) makes it easier for your eyes to focus. In addition, you'll spend less time (benefit) looking for your favorite channels because it puts your most viewed channels at the beginning (feature) so you can flip through them easily (benefit) to find your favorite shows.

You then follow up with a confirming question, (Important! OPEN-ENDED questions are less-likely to get a "no.") "How does that sound?" "Where did you decided to put it?"

If you get a positive response, reinforce their decision, "It definitely would look great there!" or "Let's get things completed so you can start to enjoy your new TV as soon as possible." (the latter is closing the sale)

Step 5 - Handling Objections
Chances are you will end up with an "objection." They are things like, "I don't know. . ." or "But it's too expensive!" or "I really wanted something that I could watch my old DVDs on without having to deal with all the cables."

Handling objections is the most difficult, but most rewarding part of any sales job. Usually, the customer will voice a concern about something, or balk at making a decision. You need to ask them a few more open-ended questions, and/or empathize with them. "Tell me a little bit more about what you are thinking." "Price can be very concerning." "I'm glad you mentioned that!"

You then test for a reaction: "If we can make it affordable for you, would that help?" "This model actually has a built-in DVD/Blu-Ray player (feature) so it can handle your DVDs without the messy cables(benefit)."

If you get a positive response, you move on.

Step 6 - Closing the Sale
Sell the damn thing. "Alright I'll get Tony to get one out of stock for you and he'll bring it to the front of the store."

Easy as that.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Santa Gloss

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,957 Posts
As for getting turned down, 9 times out of 10 it's because an objection wasn't handled properly. People go to stores to buy things. If they don't buy there, the perceived need didn't outweigh the costs (money and objections) that the customer had to pay.

It's hard at first, but after a while, you become a goldmine for your employer. And that means raises and promotions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,277 Posts
Step 4 - Making the Offer
Features tell, benefits sell. Nobody wants to hear about how this TV has a 179-degree viewing angle and a curved viewing surface and has a 4k resolution. They want to hear how it benefits them to OWN said TV. "With this TV, you'll get less headaches (benefit) because the higher resolution (feature) makes it easier for your eyes to focus. In addition, you'll spend less time (benefit) looking for your favorite channels because it puts your most viewed channels at the beginning (feature) so you can flip through them easily (benefit) to find your favorite shows.
Exactly what I was talking about above.


If you get a positive response, reinforce their decision, "It definitely would look great there!" or "Let's get things completed so you can start to enjoy your new TV as soon as possible." (the latter is closing the sale)
I'd get slightly annoyed if you said the latter to me when I did not yet make it clear that I was actually going to buy the thing.


Step 5 - Handling Objections
Chances are you will end up with an "objection." They are things like, "I don't know. . ." or "But it's too expensive!" or "I really wanted something that I could watch my old DVDs on without having to deal with all the cables."

Handling objections is the most difficult, but most rewarding part of any sales job. Usually, the customer will voice a concern about something, or balk at making a decision. You need to ask them a few more open-ended questions, and/or empathize with them. "Tell me a little bit more about what you are thinking." "Price can be very concerning." "I'm glad you mentioned that!"

You then test for a reaction: "If we can make it affordable for you, would that help?" "This model actually has a built-in DVD/Blu-Ray player (feature) so it can handle your DVDs without the messy cables(benefit)."

If you get a positive response, you move on.
Again, exactly what I was talking about.

The empathizing part would not really work on me unless it is aimed towards extracting information on needs more.

And then yes, knowing to pick the right product, yeah. So many salespeople have no idea about that.


Btw, I usually don't need help with these things as I research stuff for myself before buying things and I'd feel I was not enough in control if I relied on just a salesman telling me stuff but I don't mind salespeople giving me more information to speed up my researching process. I definitely don't need help with the decision making process itself (interference there would actually again be slightly annoying) but I know quite some other people do need help there and I imagine a good salesman would be able to discern which type of person he/she is talking to.

I would say the slight annoyance does not matter in terms of what decision I will make in the end but it does matter in terms of whether I'll return to the same place. I really don't like having to listen forever to salespeople trying to explain everything I did not need to hear about. Waste of time. For me the rapport building phase is also a waste of time and again would make it less likely for me to return to the same place later. So hm, again, a good salesman would do well to discern such differences about people... maybe I expect too much there ;)


As for getting turned down, 9 times out of 10 it's because an objection wasn't handled properly. People go to stores to buy things. If they don't buy there, the perceived need didn't outweigh the costs (money and objections) that the customer had to pay.
9 times out of 10? Never because the person just went in to look around? Never because the store did not have a large enough selection to cater for the needs (including wide range of prices)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,957 Posts
Exactly what I was talking about above.
I'd get slightly annoyed if you said the latter to me when I did not yet make it clear that I was actually going to buy the thing.
Cool. Still one of the best researched and successful sales approaches in the world, but hey, let's talk about how "I" might react to it.

The empathizing part would not really work on me unless it is aimed towards extracting information on needs more.
And then yes, knowing to pick the right product, yeah. So many salespeople have no idea about that.
I don't know who you are, but people like being empathized with. Not everyone is the same, but it's true for the majority of people. Have fun with that.

Btw, I usually don't need help with these things as I research stuff for myself . . . I'd feel I was not enough in control. . . I don't mind salespeople giving me more information . . . For me the rapport building phase is also a waste of time and again would make it less likely for me to return to the same place later. So hm, again, a good salesman would do well to discern such differences about people... maybe I expect too much there ;)
Let's talk more about how "I" might react to it. Again. Thanks for playing.

9 times out of 10? Never because the person just went in to look around? Never because the store did not have a large enough selection to cater for the needs (including wide range of prices)?
Those are the 1 in 10. Okay, I'll give you some credit and make it 1 in 5.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,197 Posts
I owned my own business for a span of about eight years and handling the sales aspects were what I hated most (followed closely by accounting/bookkeeping). Having to be "on" for 8-9 hours a day, either dealing with walk-ins or making visits to customer sites, was way too damned draining. It made me become a clock-watcher (something I'd never been prior or since)... I just couldn't wait to lock the front door at 5:30 and let out a sigh of relief for finally being alone to do all of the other things I needed to do to run the business.

The funny thing was that when I sold the business and introduced the new owners to my key clients, the clients didn't believe me when I told them (in a nice way) that I hated dealing with customers. "Oh, we loved working with you... you were always so helpful and so easy to work with".

I suppose I was never a true "salesperson"... I saw myself and acted as if I was an expert consultant... asking questions and finding appropriate solutions for the customer. I could never "sell" anything to them... but I am good at identifying and solving problems.

Now that I'm back to my engineering roots, I'm still peripherally involved with sales. However, when I deal directly with clients it's always in that consultative mode rather than making any kind of sales pitch. It's also much easier than when I owned the business, because the client meetings are scheduled in advance with at least some knowledge of their needs and typically only last an hour or two, as opposed to having random people with random needs walking in the front door all day long.

Cool. Still one of the best researched and successful sales approaches in the world, but hey, let's talk about how "I" might react to it.

I don't know who you are, but people like being empathized with. Not everyone is the same, but it's true for the majority of people. Have fun with that.

Let's talk more about how "I" might react to it. Again. Thanks for playing.

Those are the 1 in 10. Okay, I'll give you some credit and make it 1 in 5.
I have to agree wholeheartedly with @myst91 . It's a huge turnoff to have anybody try to "sell" me anything, especially if they try to "empathize". Just cut that phony crap out. I don't really care what the sales manual says... it annoying and unwelcomed by ME, and I suspect that is true for many other ISTJs (and TJs in general). It's even worse when it's done by people unskilled at it (and, unfortunately, that seems to be the majority). There's nothing worse than feeling like your in a scripted conversation with someone that really doesn't know very much about what it is they're selling.

Wanna sell me something? Introduce yourself and let me know you're available to answer questions. Then walk away. I will never make a decision with someone hovering around and incessantly yakking at me.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,159 Posts
I've noticed that ISTJs make very good sales people in a very logical way to certain other people. If you want to be told straight up about a product or service, get an ISTJ, INTJ, or INTP. I've had quite a few ISTJs in my life and they are good at selling a few things but they are go out and get them used car salesmen by any means. They are the honest bang for your buck types.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,277 Posts
Cool. Still one of the best researched and successful sales approaches in the world, but hey, let's talk about how "I" might react to it.
I don't see what your problem is or why you took my post so personally. Since I did not intend anything as personal criticism.

I was describing how I work, and then if someone can take something from it then cool, if not, too bad, but, as indicated before, I do think it would be a cool sales strategy where the salesperson takes into account some types of individual reactions. :p


I don't know who you are, but people like being empathized with. Not everyone is the same, but it's true for the majority of people. Have fun with that.
I know some people like it and some don't. Have fun with...? :dry:


Let's talk more about how "I" might react to it. Again. Thanks for playing.
See above.


Those are the 1 in 10. Okay, I'll give you some credit and make it 1 in 5.
I want to add, I don't think the salesperson, including OP of this thread, needs to feel negative about those cases. That's probably obvious but I've seen people affected by such things too much...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,396 Posts
No, I honestly don't care if people buy the product or don't.

Question I have to ask at the pharmacy I work at:
"You want a shot to prevent some illness? no? ok bye"

If I tried I may be able to sell salt to a slug but meh *shrugs* it's not something I care to do
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top