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@Electra Oh I like this idea. I will throw a picture and let's get this started!

semykina_flea_market1.jpg

Flea Market, Victoria Semykina.


What do you see, feel, and think is the intention of the artist? There are no right answers, let your thoughts flow freely!
 
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@Electra Oh I like this idea. I will throw a picture and let's get this started!

View attachment 737457

Flea Market, Victoria Semykina.


What do you see, feel, and think is the intention of the artist? There are no right answers, let your thoughts flow freely!
This looks like improv to me. How 'worthless' objects, in random order, form a fine looking place. Most of the stuff is utterly unuseful still (e.g. the boot, the key, ...), but I guess in life, choatic as it is, imagination adds a kind of order. The man, however, is sad. Perhaps because he stands too close and thinks he is part of the alleged mess.
 

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Here is one of my favorite paintings:



The Philosopher in Meditation, Rembrandt Van Rijn.

In the original work, sources claim, there was a person standing up the staircase. On this image, however, even the shadow is hardly visible. The recreation below shows what Van Rijn's original really would have looked like.

 


Anyway. The image gives me a calm and contemplative sensation (hence title of this work), especially because of the warm colors.

Significant elements are the two bright spots on the painting: (1) the light by the window, illuminating the philosopher's face (inspiration? holiness? vision?), (2) the fire in the dark, at the bottom left, and its reflection on the woman's face (warmth? hope? care?).

For those interested in the topic of bright, heavenly colors in art: Aldoux Huxley writes about it in his book The Doors of Perception.
 

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The Philosopher in Meditation, Rembrandt Van Rijn.
I agree the picture gives off a calm, contemplative sensation. However, it does make me wonder about the black area in the staircase (just going off of the first picture). I don't get a comfortable feeling due to the darkness surrounds the light (the staircase, the edges). It is as if it is foreshadowing tragedy. It makes me wonder what the philosopher is contemplating. It is calm, yet at the same time, feels very uneasy. The philosopher is looking away from the window, to the floor, towards the staircase. On the other side of the staircase, there is another man. It makes me wonder what their relationship is, and why that man is there. Did the man trigger the philosopher to look that way? Is the philosopher not supposed to know the man is there?


For those interested in the topic of bright, heavenly colors in art: Aldoux Huxley writes about it in his book The Doors of Perception.
Thanks for the recommendation!


Next Artwork:
Card_Players-Paul_Cezanne.jpg

The Card Players, Paul Cézanne
 
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Next Artwork:
View attachment 737529

The Card Players, Paul Cézanne
Okay. I'll start by saying that I like this painting. There doesn't seem to be anything sad, anything happy, or anything happening, in this painting, apart from these two men playing cards. It could be anywhere, at any time. Simply looks--and feels like a snapshot of daily life--without the drama. The men look very focused on their game, like life is so simple that the only thing worth thinking about is this game, at this very moment. I imagine them going to work, and then getting in that painting, to spend some time simply playing. It's really ...uncomplicated, it's just there. There is a bottle between the two--which isn't open apparently. Maybe their life is so empty of drama that they just forgot or didn't have a reason to drink themselves silly (they are in a bar, tavern, café... and they don't seem to drink anything). It looks like wine. Or maybe they are so intent on their game, that they just really forgot to open the bottle altogether. I also really like the feelings this painting gives me. Like life is really simple and calm, unhurried. I also like the colors, it's not too bright, but still it doesn't lack life nor colors. It's kinda relaxing. I can well hear some soft sounds in the background--people talking--other men playing cards, or other men alone in a corner, drinking slowly. I really like it.

Since you chose a French artist, I'll give you another:

téléchargement.jpg

This is Edgar Degas' "L'Absinthe".
 

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Since you chose a French artist, I'll give you another:

View attachment 737545

This is Edgar Degas' "L'Absinthe".
The title is an obvious wordplay for me. The beverage, yes, because they are in a cafe, but actually refering to the woman. She looks aloof, dreamy, alone: absent ('absent', 'l'absence', 'the absence' in French). The grim colors accentuate the dullness of the real life moment.

The difference between the man and the woman is that the woman stares blankly, lost in thought - potentially uneasy thoughts because that is how the time and place makes her feel, but it could be nice daydreams as well. The man, on the other hand, is looking at a person or something else happening in the real life scenery. While he also seems a bit bored, he accepts the present as it is, more uncaring and in all its colors, and sees the whisical side of the events. Very extraverted (EP type), while the woman is the quiet type, the social misfit (likely IN). The color of their drinks, finally, adds to their personality and how they perceive reality.

I was just wondering about the perspective. The tabletops in particular. They seem to just be floating, and press the man and woman tightly against the wall. I wonder if that was purposely.
 

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@NipNip You didn't add a picture! :) I will work off of Degas as well then.
 
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Since you chose a French artist, I'll give you another:

View attachment 737545

This is Edgar Degas' "L'Absinthe".
This work is extremely dull. Even though the man and the woman are sitting together, it is as if they are strangers. The man has his attention to something outside of our perspective, while the woman is looking down in disappointment. There is no sign of happiness in the painting--only boredom, disappointment, and sadness. They are both dressed well, and each has a drink in front of them. So I assume money is not an issue for them. However, hardship of life is evidently present. Something more psychological; emotional. Because of the sense of distance of the couple, I assume the hardship is interpersonal. Maybe they had a fight, or maybe its something deeper and more permanent than that.

The perspective is interesting, you are right. It is almost as if the audience is an observer. The ones who see this painting is sitting across from the couple. It's not directly across, but diagonal. It gives a feel of peeking. We are secretly glancing over to the couple because we know something is off. We sensed the sadness and was suspicious. That is why we looked over.

Another thing that strikes me as interesting is the shadow. I am not sure if I can give a deep analysis of it, but I recognize its presence. All I can say about it is the thickness of the shadow adds another layer of gloom.


Next work:
les-amants.jpg
Les Amants, René Magritte
 
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Next work:
View attachment 737682
Les Amants, René Magritte
The layers of colors are very easy on the eye, making me wonder what is real and what is imagined. (I think, don't quote me on this, the floating head might be.) The next big question is the identity of the man. He could be a former lover, a romantic prospect, or, and this is perhaps the weidest of notions, herself - in a way, for the similarities, other than gender, are striking. Lastly, I think the combination of pale (body) and pink (dress) are just perfect.

Bonus tip:

 
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
How embarrassing, showing up without a gift...

I didn't know it was going to be this kind of thread. Are those the rules, @Electra?
No!! You most sertaintly don't have to add a picture. The likes from me is for encouragement for you to put one here if you like :)
Only if you want to.

Also it's legal to analyze all pictures at all times.
I like to think about a picture for a while and maybe I write my analyzes down.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
@Electra Oh I like this idea. I will throw a picture and let's get this started!

View attachment 737457

Flea Market, Victoria Semykina.


What do you see, feel, and think is the intention of the artist? There are no right answers, let your thoughts flow freely!
The black and white could be to symbolize another reality for example a dream.
But it also mean a rigid moral system.
But the black and white also gives a creepy feel.
The black wall can symbolyze a hopeless, depressive outlook/future, full of detailed memories of living together with a lady? Maybe this lady is dead and he is selling her stuff. It could also be about cheating in a relationship. Why? The long elegant sensual boot, the elegant drinks, the key, the messy phonewire with curly lines-off the hook, too (as in stop calling me or I won't hang up on you)...idk. interesting!
 

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View attachment 737865
Would anyone analyze this Meisje met de parel
It seems nothing more than a portrait at first glance, as I feel there should be no story to be read behind it due to the lack of background. However, the way she glances and how she is faced to the side gives a new perspective. It makes me question the relationship between the woman and the painter. Or perhaps she is just prettier from that angle, I don't know. I love the softness of the colors and the brushstrokes. Lighting and shading is very realistic, and the flat black background makes the painting easier to focus on the main subject of the painting and emphasizes that it is only about the subject. I am not familiar with the culture of the subject, so I can't say anything about her clothing. However, it seems exotic to me.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
It seems nothing more than a portrait at first glance, as I feel there should be no story to be read behind it due to the lack of background. However, the way she glances and how she is faced to the side gives a new perspective. It makes me question the relationship between the woman and the painter. Or perhaps she is just prettier from that angle, I don't know. I love the softness of the colors and the brushstrokes. Lighting and shading is very realistic, and the flat black background makes the painting easier to focus on the main subject of the painting and emphasizes that it is only about the subject. I am not familiar with the culture of the subject, so I can't say anything about her clothing. However, it seems exotic to me.
Thank you :) It is a dutch painting. In that period they were breaking free from a Spanish occupation it seems. And pearls were very, very expensive...
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Here is one of my favorite paintings:



The Philosopher in Meditation, Rembrandt Van Rijn.

In the original work, sources claim, there was a person standing up the staircase. On this image, however, even the shadow is hardly visible. The recreation below shows what Van Rijn's original really would have looked like.

 


Anyway. The image gives me a calm and contemplative sensation (hence title of this work), especially because of the warm colors.

Significant elements are the two bright spots on the painting: (1) the light by the window, illuminating the philosopher's face (inspiration? holiness? vision?), (2) the fire in the dark, at the bottom left, and its reflection on the woman's face (warmth? hope? care?).

For those interested in the topic of bright, heavenly colors in art: Aldoux Huxley writes about it in his book The Doors of Perception.
I get a sense of nostalgia. The darkness could symbolize the destruction of the future and the light could symbolize hope.
The stairs are bent in a spiral which could symbolize the continuation of the seasons of life- ie; it's not made in a circle but continues to spiral upwards in a simmilar yet still somewhat different ways compeared to a circle. Seasons come and seasons go, but the allways come back, but in each season there are some differences from last year. The light hits the spiral in the top and bottom, while the middle seems dark. This could be compared to the light spring then summer and autumn and then the dark winter which ends in a new light spring again. Life comes, then we die, then there is new life. There is a woman in the corner which heats up his life and gives it warmth and keeps the fire alive. So light comes not only from outside but also from another human who in addition creates warmth. There is nothing glamorous about the picure but the house looks like it has been used for a long time and the people are aged. The door behind the man looks mystic and makes me want to go and see what is inside, the picture looks like there is a whole story to tell and it makes me curious.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I agree the picture gives off a calm, contemplative sensation. However, it does make me wonder about the black area in the staircase (just going off of the first picture). I don't get a comfortable feeling due to the darkness surrounds the light (the staircase, the edges). It is as if it is foreshadowing tragedy. It makes me wonder what the philosopher is contemplating. It is calm, yet at the same time, feels very uneasy. The philosopher is looking away from the window, to the floor, towards the staircase. On the other side of the staircase, there is another man. It makes me wonder what their relationship is, and why that man is there. Did the man trigger the philosopher to look that way? Is the philosopher not supposed to know the man is there?




Thanks for the recommendation!


Next Artwork:
View attachment 737529

The Card Players, Paul Cézanne
One of the men has light cards, the other one has dark cards. It could be the difference between good and bad luck. The guy with the dark cards hang with his head. There is a bottle on the table, the alchohol could deliberetly be used by one of the parts to confuse, manipulate and distract the other player and make him loose but it could also symblize that they try to break the ice and get closer over a game of cards...The colours are very plain and safe, there isn't much drama, and there is a duk on the table which is rarely seen in a pub, and more something you would find in a home, but both of the men has their hats and jackets on, and this could meen they are out somewhere. The guy to the left-with the light-colored cards- looks more posh and snobbish then the guy in the left due to his hat. Maybe it's just the impression he likes to give to the world, it doesn't have to be that way for real, it could be a fasade. He also seem to have the economy to smoke a pipe. The guy to the left with the shady cards looks more focused on getting it right then the other guy. Maybe the (seemingly) rich guy does not need to make money or win so much more stuff because he has enough?
 

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I am not familiar with the culture of the subject, so I can't say anything about her clothing. However, it seems exotic to me.
It is probably the most famous painting (or artwork in general perhaps) in Belgium and The Netherlands. Her earring, the pearl ('parel', in Dutch, see title: Meisje met de parel), being the talking point. As well as the expression on her face, similarly to the Mona Lisa I would say.

They even made a song about it two years ago:

 
 

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I get a sense of nostalgia. The darkness could symbolize the destruction of the future and the light could symbolize hope.
The stairs are bent in a spiral which could symbolize the continuation of the seasons of life- ie; it's not made in a circle but continues to spiral upwards in a simmilar yet still somewhat different ways compeared to a circle. Seasons come and seasons go, but the allways come back, but in each season there are some differences from last year. The light hits the spiral in the top and bottom, while the middle seems dark. This could be compared to the light spring then summer and autumn and then the dark winter which ends in a new light spring again. Life comes, then we die, then there is new life. There is a woman in the corner which heats up his life and gives it warmth and keeps the fire alive. So light comes not only from outside but also from another human who in addition creates warmth. There is nothing glamorous about the picure but the house looks like it has been used for a long time and the people are aged. The door behind the man looks mystic and makes me want to go and see what is inside, the picture looks like there is a whole story to tell and it makes me curious.
Interesting notion, the seasons. Another argument could be that the staircase represents the philosopher's thoughts - going around in circles.

The door is mystic, you are right. And it is not made for people either, judging by its height. It doesn't look like it could be flung open any second either; it looks rather stale, and one wouldn't generally sit right in front of it.
 
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