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It appears that ThePhilosophicalBoy has taken down his blog on Wordpress. I dug up his ISFP article via the wayback machine, and am posting it here, so it doesn't get lost forever. I don't know why he took down his blog, but I think it's a shame that some of what he's written is gone. I don't know if posting it here is allowed or not, so if it's not, please, moderators, feel free to delete it.

Warning: objects in this picture might be more awesome than a photograph can capture.


Keirsey Description: “The Composer (Artist)”

Honest Description: “The Watchful Observer”


Prototypical Examples: The Dude from the film “The Big Lebowski,” Andy Warhol (often mistyped as INFP), Enya, Michael Jackson, Paul McCartney, Eminem, Prince, Bob Dylan, Marilyn Monroe, David Bowie, Princess Diana (often mistyped as INFP), Leni Riefenstahl, Amélie from the film “Amélie,” Bubbles from “The Powerpuff Girls,” Flounder from the Disney film “The Little Mermaid”



Pros:


- Make great lyricists


- Make for lovely furniture for any social gathering


- Make great friends


- The most easygoing type there is


- Artistic without being annoying


- Are not assholes


- The most idealistic Sensor


- Versatile hobbyists



Cons:


- Are timid to share or live out their passions in life and may lead to them being unfulfilled


- Makes other types jealous that they are not like the ISFP


- Prone to Dependent Personality Disorder


- Might be seen as lazy or unambitious; not likely to climb the social/power hieararchy


- Can be fleeting in their many hobbies or passions, making them seem undedicated to others



Reasoning: ISFP’s are pretty awesome, let me just say that off the bat. They tend to be nice, friendly (esp. in comparison to most Introverts), creative, and have a quirky sense of humor. Although they aren’t the type to come off as idealistic, they appreciate and even admire the abstract, and enjoy literary comparisons and metaphors, much like their iNtuitive counterparts. More than any other type, ISFP’s are relaxed, calm, and non-aggressive. ISFP’s prefer to live in a “live and let live” environment. Unlike most Sensors, they tend to enjoy the obscure and counterculture, and often develop very fine and particular tastes in art, whether it be film, literature, or the visual and performing arts. Although naturally hands-on learners, well-developed ISFP’s tend to process their gained knowledge into bigger picture ideas. ISFP’s are dominantly Introverted Feelers, and have a special rose-tinted lens through which they view everything. Despite being conversationalists, ISFP’s can be very difficult to get to know well, and are often very secretive or timid about sharing the deeper side of themselves with others. ISFP’s enjoy analyzing people and how they function in a very passive way, and may be prone to doing subtle social experiments in groups of friends in order to invoke certain reactions, but even they are usually not conscious of this effort. They are very keen concerning what gets on people’s nerves, mostly because they are so tactful at consciously observing other people and their reactions to each other. Because of this, ISFP’s are masters when it comes to not being a total douchebag or an asshole. ISFP’s, like their INFP counterparts, find beauty in disorganized chaos. What you see as a dilapidated warehouse the ISFP might see as a magical or majestic place to read a book or explore in. For this reason, ISFP’s tend to draw artistic inspiration and even emotional arousal from maintaining a messy lifestyle or living quarters. ISFP’s love getting lost in their memories, subsequently disorienting their sequences, and are prone to losing track of time or chronological concepts altogether. To the ISFP, this is an indicative sign that their lives are going extremely well. ISFP’s love visiting exotic places and experiencing exotic sensations. ISFP’s are surprisingly capable of tremendous acts of evil, in fact more so than any other type, but are incapable of bringing these realities to fruition; this facet of ISFP’s is very difficult to explain in words because it is a total Fi dominant thing, but any ISFP reading this and maybe some INFP’s will know exactly what I am talking about here. Aside from that though, ISFP’s are like the most innocent thing ever. It’s as if they were created to counter all the guilt in the world. David Bowie is a pretty good example of an ISFP. He’s enigmatic, sexy, really nice, and his music and lyrics flow through this inner fantasy world that he keeps locked up from everyone, and hence very little people understand what he’s even talking about (see: “Life on Mars?”). That’s the other cool thing about ISFP’s; that they speak their own language! (This is a little misleading, as all types speak their own internal “language of understanding,” but ISFP’s in a more literal sense). In fact, you can see this lyrical esotericism in many ISFP musicians, Bob Dylan being another good example. If you aren’t another ISFP, you’re probably not going to understand it, or much of what they say, so don’t even try to. Just learn to appreciate the rhythm of their voices and musings, because there’s a lot of rare wisdom in their words. When it comes down to it, ISFP’s are naturally designed observers. ISFP’s live their life always engaged in observation, like their entire existence is a movie and they are the audience behind their eye sockets. Other types might find this to be a horrible existence, never being directly involved in life, but to the ISFP, the best experiences are the ones most people don’t even notice until they take a step back from all the action.

ISFP’s are similar to their Thinking counterpart, the ISTP, in the sense that both are very conscious and observational concerning their surroundings. ISFP’s relish in the simple things in life, more than any other type. They are likely to take up a hobby that requires tactility and strong phenomenological sensations, like gardening, painting, photography, or cooking. ISTP’s also enjoy getting their hands dirty, but in a more…risk-taking sense. Whereas the ISFP enjoys spending time in relaxed environments, the ISTP seeks the thrill and excitement of the rush of action. The ISTP is a daredevil, blowing off their steam through racecar driving, extreme athletics, the martial arts, intensive mediation (whatever that means), bungee jumping, sky diving, etc. While both of these somewhat reclusive types live their lives with the world going by without much care, the ISTP is more action-oriented, while the ISFP is more tranquil.

Compared to ISFJ’s, their Judging counterpart, the two types are similar in the sense that both take immense pleasure in fond memories. Both types are inclined to seek peace and tranquility, without having to force themselves into difficult situations that require intense action-oriented pursuits. Both types are likely to enjoy gardening as well, that is, more likely than any other type. ISFJ’s are usually not as artistic or creative as their Perceptional counterpart is, but still enjoy a good book or film like the ISFP. ISFJ’s are, like ISFP’s, very tactful with people’s emotions. ISFJ’s, however, are more likely to actively take it upon themselves to make people feel even better than they are when the ISFJ finds them. ISFP’s, even though they like to make people feel better (which they often do), it is likely an indirect effort on part of the ISFP, who just happens to be adaptive with people and enjoys doing whatever the crowd is up to.
 

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Thanks. Overall I like the description, but still have a hard time in grasping the difference between ISFJ and ISFP, it seems so subtle. I also don't understand the evil-part.

ISFP’s are surprisingly capable of tremendous acts of evil, in fact more so than any other type, but are incapable of bringing these realities to fruition; this facet of ISFP’s is very difficult to explain in words because it is a total Fi dominant thing, but any ISFP reading this and maybe some INFP’s will know exactly what I am talking about here. Aside from that though, ISFP’s are like the most innocent thing ever.
 

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Thanks. Overall I like the description, but still have a hard time in grasping the difference between ISFJ and ISFP, it seems so subtle. I also don't understand the evil-part.
This was one thing I really related to! A for instance. Those Boca Haram scum or the ISIS scum. I can easily imagine some horrible ways to take care of them, so they would know how their victims felt.... In fact, having had to stand my ground as a teenager in public school, I learned what going berserk meant. I do fear that were I ever properly provoked, I could be capable of horrible acts of cruelty.... I would like to think I could never do it in real life, but it is a weird fear of mine I've had since I was a young teen...

Edit:

One other point I forgot to mention re: ISFJs and ISFPs.

ISFJ’s, however, are more likely to actively take it upon themselves to make people feel even better than they are when the ISFJ finds them. ISFP’s, even though they like to make people feel better (which they often do), it is likely an indirect effort on part of the ISFP, who just happens to be adaptive with people and enjoys doing whatever the crowd is up to.
I so very much understand this point. I worked for 15 years very closely with an ISJ guy, and this one point is very accurate to describe the two of us. He poured his whole self into making people feel better/at home, while I was much less direct at it, and unable to do so in such a direct manner like he did. I frequently felt so inadequate compared to him (in this area), and had nothing but admiration at how easily and well he could do it.
 

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This was one thing I really related to! A for instance. Those Boca Haram scum or the ISIS scum. I can easily imagine some horrible ways to take care of them, so they would know how their victims felt.... In fact, having had to stand my ground as a teenager in public school, I learned what going berserk meant. I do fear that were I ever properly provoked, I could be capable of horrible acts of cruelty.... I would like to think I could never do it in real life, but it is a weird fear of mine I've had since I was a young teen...
I really don't have this. I just feel sad about cruelty. But maybe it has to do with past experiences?

One other point I forgot to mention re: ISFJs and ISFPs.

I so very much understand this point. I worked for 15 years very closely with an ISJ guy, and this one point is very accurate to describe the two of us. He poured his whole self into making people feel better/at home, while I was much less direct at it, and unable to do so in such a direct manner like he did. I frequently felt so inadequate compared to him (in this area), and had nothing but admiration at how easily and well he could do it.
Well, it remains difficult. I do conscious effort to put people at ease, but I can't really tell how good I'm at it. It's just a minimum necessary to make them feel comfortable (for example starting a conversation with someone new at work), but once they're settled and in conversation with other people I'll retreat. I'm not going to entertain them if someone else (usually the extravert) is better at this. This could be growing up, though. I was less focussed on others when I was younger.
 

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I really don't have this. I just feel sad about cruelty. But maybe it has to do with past experiences?
Or lack thereof... i.e. you haven't been pushed much into your inferior function. That'd be a blessing. I think there is also a bit of a male/female thing going on. Guys are expected to be tough, thinking, etc. and other guys tend to push themselves on other guys. That tends to push ISFP guys into their inferior at a younger age, and more frequently. And considering that most of us don't know or pay attention to these things, they just try to be a normal guy... I don't think that most girls feel that kind of pressure, and it would likely be the opposite, any aggressive tendencies they may have would be suppressed, rather than encouraged.



Well, it remains difficult. I do conscious effort to put people at ease, but I can't really tell how good I'm at it. It's just a minimum necessary to make them feel comfortable (for example starting a conversation with someone new at work), but once they're settled and in conversation with other people I'll retreat. I'm not going to entertain them if someone else (usually the extravert) is better at this. This could be growing up, though. I was less focussed on others when I was younger.
I'm like that--I can start things if necessary, but will quickly back away as soon as I can. I would rather be on the sidelines than actively involved and engaged in conversation. And yeah, that improved as I got into adulthood. And if I were in a group of people with whom I had no common ground and nobody I particularly cared about, I won't have any sense of investment or care about the environment around me.
 

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Just before something happened and I would have liked to smack my brother in the face. :angry: I didn't do it of course. I guess that's my evil side.

The last time he got me really angry, I threw a bowl of pudding over his head... :blushed: That's a few years ago, though.

Or lack thereof... i.e. you haven't been pushed much into your inferior function.
I think I have been, but because of harsh discussions with my stressed ESTP dad who I care a lot about. When he's upset there is just no escape. My tactic was: endure it, try to be as calm and reasonable as possible and take nothing personal. Exploding or taking revenge would have made things only worse. Of course he was never malicious or on purpose mean, so that's still different from coping with people really hating you and wanting to hurt you. No, I have never experienced that, thank God.
 

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Just before something happened and I would have liked to smack my brother in the face. :angry: I didn't do it of course. I guess that's my evil side.

The last time he got me really angry, I threw a bowl of pudding over his head... :blushed: That's a few years ago, though.
Aha!!! That's your evil side. :) You probably wanted to throw it at him, but didn't (yes, I'm speculating here... projecting more like it) ;-)
 

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I don't personally agree with 90% of what is written there. To say that all ISFP's are nice and dreamy and fairies and make other people jealous, that is just too uni-dimensional and doesn't have anything to do with the purpose of typology. Each ISFP is unique and not everyone fits in that overly idealized model.
 

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I like this article. its a nice article.
 

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Thanks. Overall I like the description, but still have a hard time in grasping the difference between ISFJ and ISFP, it seems so subtle. I also don't understand the evil-part.
This bit is interesting - I had a few of these moments but one really vivid one was this: When I was in my mid-20s, a young college student hit my car from the back (just a small dent). I wasn't well-versed with car repairs back then but knew it wouldn't be a large sum. I was nice about it, took her number and told her she could bank in the amount later when I found out the exact amount (it turned out to be just 90 bucks). When I did drop her a message (and follow-ups), I was ignored. I got pissed.

I used profanity and wished aloud for her to get into an accident. Then I felt really bad, apologised to the powers that be and asked them to return the same experience (nothing more) to that girl later in life so she would get a taste of her own medicine. :x
 

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As far as the little evil bit goes, I do get it. And what @ferroequinologist said about needing to be pushed into a certain state before experiencing this, eh, "evil". I've felt very cornered and pushed in some situations where I'd just think of some really terrible things. Things I would never do, but hey, the thoughts are there but not pursued or acknowledged for more than a minute, so it's not too troubling.

I loved reading this. It describes me to a T and makes me feel more in tune with myself.
 

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I've refrained from typing myself as isfp because a lot of what's written here. The perception that isfps are all softy artsy types. I am artsy but I have a pretty dark edge to me, more so than what I've seen or heard of from other isfps. That isn't to say I'm ''evil".. I'm definitely not. Not any less of an isfp, either.

Perhaps the article is slightly biased/subjective?
 

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Perhaps the article is slightly biased/subjective?
He said it was an honest perspective, not objective. Not the same thing... Honesty is admitting your biases. He does that, IMO. It was written by an INFP, btw, so close cousin, so to speak. He is quite subjective. But his honesty means that he can also be insightful, and he sees things others may miss.

BTW, sensitive does not mean "wimpy" or "soft". One can be quite prickly and be sensitive. One can be quite hotly reactionary, and what do people say when someone reacts hotly? "Don't be so sensitive!" ;-)

If you will notice, most of us here wouldn't call ourselves "artsy." I'm certainly not. Yeah, I do have a strongish aesthetic sense, but honestly, it doesn't play out much in real life... Our dark side tends to be there, under the surface... that may be, in fact, one reason that we often come across as soft--we work hard to maintain that dark side. I know that there have been times I was afraid I would kill someone--I can think of a couple times in particular, that I was on the verge of it... Corner a coyote, and he may kill you or die trying. But most of the time, he'll skitter away and avoid you. That doesn't mean he's weak or timid. He's just being a coyote--a smart one. ;-)
 
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