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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What's the temperature like inside a black hole?
Temperature only depends on the (inverse) mass of the black hole (and some other universal constants).

So, the smaller the black hole, it’s temperature will be much higher, and the other way around, large black holes are colder.

This is because all black holes evaporate (proven by Stephen Hawking, Hawking’s radiation):

Font Number Circle
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are you a black hole? Because attraction grows and time distorts the closer I get to you.
This is true for all astrophysical bodies, just with smaller effects
 

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Ik you said weird but I'll pretend you said dumb
1) what is that face inside it lol?
2) If light around a black hole bends how can you see it? That light is supposed to not be able to escape becuase it's trapped and will eventually go inside it, so how can you see the streak of light around it?
3) Also another question, if light is all around the black hole how can you see the actual black part? Like how doesn't the light around just cover it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ik you said weird but I'll pretend you said dumb
1) what is that face inside it lol?
2) If light around a black hole bends how can you see it? That light is supposed to not be able to escape becuase it's trapped and will eventually go inside it, so how can you see the streak of light around it?
3) Also another question, if light is all around the black hole how can you see the actual black part? Like how doesn't the light around just cover it?
Here are some more realistic pictures of black holes (below), no faces inside.

Real: with source Event Horizon telescope/project
Sky Amber Astronomical object Art Heat


Amber Sky Astronomical object Heat Gas

Computer simulation (real/using equations):

Atmosphere Natural environment Orange Art Font

You would see some light bending effects and accretion disc, which contains of matter around black hole (the matter is on very high temperatures due to strong gravitational fields).
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What do you think about variable dimensionality? Like, are black holes only an issue if you assume space is some newtontarded uniformly dimensioned background?
Time is not necessarily 1 dimension everywhere either. Hawking said.
Black holes exist as assumed by general theory of relativity (4D space-time), and are today considered to be confirmed experimentally (observational cosmology).

Probably similar equations other than GTR would also have singularities, but I am not sure what would be the equation/theory.

I didn’t study multiverse, could be a part of this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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I've thought a lot about black holes. I don't think black holes even have interiors. At the event horizon, time stands still. Beyond the event horizon is a bubble of nothingness and nonexistence.
 

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are vaginas black holes? okay okay, on a more serious note I know that black holes can actually 'eat' light buut what is it effectively that gives a black hole its gravity strong enough to devour light? I mean the thing formed as a result of a dying star imploding on its own gravity but do they actually last forever or can you have a black hole that 'run's' out of momentum? or... suction power ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I've thought a lot about black holes. I don't think black holes even have interiors. At the event horizon, time stands still. Beyond the event horizon is a bubble of nothingness and nonexistence.
Time only appears to stand still for the outside observer (who observes the event horizon). Whoever goes inside/over event horizon has a different notion of time. It’s not nothing inside, definitely strong gravitational forces, and depending on the type of black hole other interesting effects are possible (eg. ring shaped singularity or rotating holes).
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
what is it effectively that gives a black hole its gravity strong enough to devour light? I mean the thing formed as a result of a dying star imploding on its own gravity but do they actually last forever or can you have a black hole that 'run's' out of momentum? or... suction power ;)
Gravity is infinitely strong in the singularity (it’s a “hole” in space-time).
The other question, no, they don’t last forever, they evaporate and vanish, in 90 mlrd years or so.
 
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some people theorized synthesizing a black hole would be one method to traveling back in time... but maybe im confusing that with worm holes... if you travel at the speed of light with enough velocity ect. sooooo what's the difference between a worm hole and a black hole :U?
 

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Time only appears to stand still for the outside observer (who observes the event horizon). Whoever goes inside/over event horizon has a different notion of time. It’s not nothing inside, definitely strong gravitational forces, and depending on the type of black hole other interesting effects are possible (eg. ring shaped singularity or rotating holes).
An outside observer watches the largest black hole is the universe for 10^70 years. He watches all the stars around him fade and dissolve into Hawking radiation. Meanwhile, time never passes at the event horizon. The event horizon shrinks and disappears. Finally, the last star, formerly the largest black hole, in the universe dissolves. The entire universe cools to absolute zero.
 

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An outside observer watches the largest black hole is the universe for 10^70 years. He watches all the stars around him fade and dissolve into Hawking radiation. Meanwhile, time never passes at the event horizon. The event horizon shrinks and disappears. Finally, the last star, formerly the largest black hole, in the universe dissolves. The entire universe cools to absolute zero.
Let's say an astronaut fell into the black hole. What remained of the astronaut would never pass the event horizon. It would hit the surface of star once the object lost sufficient mass to no longer be a black hole. To what remained of the astronaut, time would appear like very little passed, though 10^70 years may have passed in the perspective of an outside observer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
An outside observer watches the largest black hole is the universe for 10^70 years. He watches all the stars around him fade and dissolve into Hawking radiation. Meanwhile, time never passes at the event horizon. The event horizon shrinks and disappears. Finally, the last star, formerly the largest black hole, in the universe dissolves. The entire universe cools to absolute zero.
The fate of the universe is to cool / remain “nothing”, yes. The last astrophysical bodies that remain will be black holes, before them all warm bodies will cool off and evaporate. So basically all that will remain will be photons. If someone is interested, really smart and funny man explaining the same thing: Penrose lecture
 
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