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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I noticed that there seems to be a lot of people here making threads and posting in threads asking art-related questions lately, so I’m making this thread which will be a place where those questions can be seen and answered (relatively) promptly.


I’m currently working full-time as a freelance digital illustrator. I have experience with traditional art media in the past, most specifically in watercolours, oils and acrylics, though right now I’m rediscovering and actively reading about other mediums such as colour pencils, pastels, oil pastels and stuff. I also have a very modest experience with one 3D rendering program which is Maya.


I will definitely be able to answer your art theory questions, such as colour theory, composition, forms, lines, negative space etc. and questions about digital art programs, especially Photoshop and Illustrator. I can most likely answer your technical questions about traditional mediums and materials.


I have rudimentary knowledge about art history and movements, as in I know about the general concepts of a lot about them but nothing very in-depth, though I will know more about Greek & Roman classical art and about artists whose work I like.


You can also ask me questions about getting into the commercial art (not fine art, I’m not familiar with that sorry) industry.


Please bear in mind that I don’t presume to know everything about art and will try to answer all the questions to the best of my ability. I also encourage anyone who may have something to add to participate!
 

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How can a person make a living (enough money to actually survive independently) doing art freely without other people directing what it has to look like, and in a way that doesn't require knowing anything about money, taxes, filling out forms or advertising/self-promotion?
 

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How many different types of art are there?
How does one make art amazing by making it happy, sad, abstract, dark, etc?
 
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Do digital artists tend to work with mouse only for drawing complex lines and sketches?

Do you use a drawing/pen tablet, and would you recommend it?
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How can a person make a living (enough money to actually survive independently) doing art freely without other people directing what it has to look like, and in a way that doesn't require knowing anything about money, taxes, filling out forms or advertising/self-promotion?
For a lot of artists, promoting and marketing themselves and managing the money/administrative side of the business is hard and just unappealing. Stephen has an artist friend who also said the same thing. I know I find that to be the case because I hate doing that kind of stuff, and I also tend to take rejection really badly, like when I emailed companies or answered and not hear back from them or saw other artists get chosen over me...argh! and I'd really rather be holed up in my room and just draw.

The thing is that, not promoting and marketing your art isn't an option, and it's not fair that a lot of artists less skilled than you are successful commercially only because they're really good at promoting themselves. I think that you would really benefit by partnering up with a friend who really believes in your art and who is good at sales/marketing to act as your agent and work out a percentage between both of you. I have an ENTJ friend who volunteered to do that for me, and she's a lot more aggressive and proactive than I am, but unfortunately her full time job doesn't let her do that. Frank Frazetta's wife made him a household name within the fantasy art genre because she's really good at marketing him.

I think you would do really well within the pop surrealist market. Have you looked at galleries that will exhibit that genre of art?

edit: you can join art communities on the web to get more exposure, though these can take a lot of upkeep and networking. Are you on sites like deviantart?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
How many different types of art are there?
It depends on what you define as art. There are 2d art and 3d art, as in sculptures and installations and stuff of which there are so many genres and subgenres, and of which I know nothing about. Video and filmmaking is also conventionally defined as art, and I know nothing about that either. The visual effects you see in movies can also be defined as art. makeup can also be art.

How does one make art amazing by making it happy, sad, abstract, dark, etc?
By a combination of forms, lines, colours, composition and subject matter.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Do digital artists tend to work with mouse only for drawing complex lines and sketches?
Most digital artists I know use a graphics tablet to create their art, though of course it's possible to create amazing art using a mouse. It is certainly easier and feels more natural to use a tablet than mouse.

Do you use a drawing/pen tablet, and would you recommend it?
Yes, I use Wacom Intuos4 A4 size and I highly recommend it. However, if you are just beginning and/or not really planning to be serious, you don't need to invest in an Intuos; a Bamboo would be fine and is certainly more affordable. I have not used a non-Wacom brand graphics tablet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have heard the terms warm colors and cool colors. What is meant by that
Warm colours are colours like yellow, red, orange – colours that you generally associated with stuff that are warm, like fire, the sun …etc.

Cool colours are colours like blue and green – colours that you generally associate with cold, winter, etc.

However, this gets more complicated, because many colours have warm and cool versions. The warm version of the colours will have a more yellowish or orangish cast while the cool version of the colour will have a more bluish cast. For example, in terms of art pigments, Cadmium Red and Alizarin Crimson are both red, but cadmium red is definitely warm red while alizarin crimson is a cool red.

Example:



Please let me know if I’ve explained this adequately.
 
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You did, thank you

Follow up question:

What are the implications if any, does this have on creating art work. Like is it ok to mix cool and warm colors together

Sincerely an NT musician who is visually challenged
 

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I have always noticed a tension in the art community between making money and retaining a vision of one's own integrity. What are your thoughts on this? How does a person strike a good balance between these two goals?

On another note, my mom is an ISFJ landscape painter. She's good with the organizational side of her home business but I still feel like I want to promote her. I just want to do it in the most lucrative way that doesn't involve selling out, or becoming like Thomas Kinkaide. She hates him.
 

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What is your favorite kind of art? Is there more than 1?
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have always noticed a tension in the art community between making money and retaining a vision of one's own integrity. What are your thoughts on this? How does a person strike a good balance between these two goals?

On another note, my mom is an ISFJ landscape painter. She's good with the organizational side of her home business but I still feel like I want to promote her. I just want to do it in the most lucrative way that doesn't involve selling out, or becoming like Thomas Kinkaide. She hates him.
This actually isn't a problem for me, because besides from selling a print every once in a blue moon on my long-abandoned deviantart account, my main source of income consists of creating art according to the specifications of my clients. I separate my work-art from my personal art, so I don't take it personally and don't think that what I'm doing is selling out. I do what I do to get by and do whatever art I want in my own free time. hmm.

Kinkade seems to be one of those artists that people either really love or really hate because his art is everywhere and his style is very easy to digest for the uninitiated. Have you thought about how you want to sell your mother's work, e.g. do you want to sell only originals or originals AND prints? Have you thought of putting her art in any other merchandise?

From the information you give me, it seems like you should probably write to magazines about your mother's work, asking them to feature her, and also trying to get her work exhibited in galleries might be a good idea, too, but I don't think this is easy nor do I think you'll meet with success right away, but don't let that discourage you.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You did, thank you

Follow up question:

What are the implications if any, does this have on creating art work. Like is it ok to mix cool and warm colors together

Sincerely an NT musician who is visually challenged
Of course, in some cases it is actually recommended for simulating the brilliance and luminosity of natural light, although there are no hard and fast rules. An excellent example of this is this painting I found by Steve Gerhartz:


The stippled sunlit areas are painted with very saturated yellows and oranges while the snow is painted with relatively desturated blues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
What is your favorite kind of art? Is there more than 1?
When I thought the artists whose work i've admired, they're generally the kind of artists who make relatively representational art (i.e. realism to some degree) but with some sort of magical-realistic, surrealistic or narrative elements in the work. Some names I'l drop here: Patrick Boussignac, Jon Foster, Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Ludwig Deutsch, Rudolph Ernst, Donato Giancola, Christophe Vacher.

Lately I'm starting to really get into more expressionistic style art, like Wolfgang Ritschel's

I also like lots of other different sort of art
 
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Yes, I use Wacom Intuos4 A4 size and I highly recommend it. However, if you are just beginning and/or not really planning to be serious, you don't need to invest in an Intuos; a Bamboo would be fine and is certainly more affordable. I have not used a non-Wacom brand graphics tablet.
I went and ordered the Wacom Bamboo Pen and Touch last night from Amazon, based on your feedback, that's all I needed to hear was confirmation from a professional artist that it was worth investing in. I have been so hesitant for such a long time to go out and get one, because it was this big air of mystery to me about whether complex digital drawings were simply done by mouse, it came off as very intimidating to me. So I'm glad I took this step.

It's just a start out tablet for what I can afford right now, but I really want to start becoming familiar with them so I can move on to something more expensive in the future if need be.

So thank you so much for your advice, I respect your opinion since you're an active user of one, and I would not have yet decided on it unless I heard it first hand from someone who knew.
 
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First of all, great thread!
For a MBTI forum this seems to be very welcomed imo, because personally I never found someone in these types of forums to be so hands-on about visual art XD



For a lot of artists, promoting and marketing themselves and managing the money/administrative side of the business is hard and just unappealing. Stephen has an artist friend who also said the same thing. I know I find that to be the case because I hate doing that kind of stuff, and I also tend to take rejection really badly, like when I emailed companies or answered and not hear back from them or saw other artists get chosen over me...argh! and I'd really rather be holed up in my room and just draw.

The thing is that, not promoting and marketing your art isn't an option, and it's not fair that a lot of artists less skilled than you are successful commercially only because they're really good at promoting themselves. I think that you would really benefit by partnering up with a friend who really believes in your art and who is good at sales/marketing to act as your agent and work out a percentage between both of you. I have an ENTJ friend who volunteered to do that for me, and she's a lot more aggressive and proactive than I am, but unfortunately her full time job doesn't let her do that. Frank Frazetta's wife made him a household name within the fantasy art genre because she's really good at marketing him.

I think you would do really well within the pop surrealist market. Have you looked at galleries that will exhibit that genre of art?

edit: you can join art communities on the web to get more exposure, though these can take a lot of upkeep and networking. Are you on sites like deviantart?
This I agree completely, and having you say it as well, makes things clear for me, thanks.
Godamn heavy networking, that is the worst thing ever to get promoted; I'm really going to try to get help from someone who believes in me, like you said. Seems to be the best idea so far.




Of course, in some cases it is actually recommended for simulating the brilliance and luminosity of natural light, although there are no hard and fast rules. An excellent example of this is this painting I found by Steve Gerhartz:


The stippled sunlit areas are painted with very saturated yellows and oranges while the snow is painted with relatively desturated blues.
About saturation. The illustration you used is indeed excellent example!
Even if I am messing with digital painting for some years now and some say I'm pretty good at it, I only recently figured the real practical and artistic value of saturation, when I had to deal with skin. It used to be a headache until I found this tutorial (mainly the end) A Note on Light and Colour by *toerning on deviantART
I kept using same saturation for colors allover the painting and although that turned well in decorative pieces or more experimental, it went really bad with realism... :laughing:
 

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How difficult was it to get established? How hard is to find work? If you're willing to branch out into web design, logo design, animation, etc., is it a challenge to make a living?

Is pretty much all of the demand for digital art? If so, are carpal tunnel and getting really zombied-out every day issues many artists deal with?

Are there other career paths you've considered? If so, do you ever regret not following them?

Lots of questions. Ignore as many of them as you want. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I went and ordered the Wacom Bamboo Pen and Touch last night from Amazon, based on your feedback, that's all I needed to hear was confirmation from a professional artist that it was worth investing in. I have been so hesitant for such a long time to go out and get one, because it was this big air of mystery to me about whether complex digital drawings were simply done by mouse, it came off as very intimidating to me. So I'm glad I took this step.

It's just a start out tablet for what I can afford right now, but I really want to start becoming familiar with them so I can move on to something more expensive in the future if need be.

So thank you so much for your advice, I respect your opinion since you're an active user of one, and I would not have yet decided on it unless I heard it first hand from someone who knew.
I'm so glad I had helped! It willl be a worthwhile investment and will make digital art-ing more enjoyable than if you're just using a mouse. After years of using tablet I can't imagine going back to just using a mouse now.
 
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