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I'm by no means any expert within yoga, but living in Australia I'm completely aware of (since I have attended many sessions of) free yoga classes that "Lululemon" holds every Sunday at each of their stores. The professional yoga teachers there will happily give you "better" advice than many.. Although, I'm starting to think that Lululemon maybe an Australian only franchise.. If so, I apologise.. Ha! There's definitely other similar franchises that could help you out. Places that sell yoga mats. Inquire within


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Your lack of expert knowledge and crippling low self esteem is sickening.

Yes, they have a Lululemon in Canada and it's very popular with women; to a somewhat nauseating and sickening degree.
 

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I am really surprised more people here don't practice yoga, though. I believe it's one of the healthiest things you can do for yourself. Geesh, working out isn't all that there is.
 

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Ok I have a question. How do I make my calves bigger?
Calve raises to put it simply, but if you're not training in the gym you can just use an elevated platform, whether it be an aerobic step or a mere concrete slab. You'll have your feet around 30cm apart and only your tip toes placed on the edge of the platform, so you'll need something to help you balance.

This is where you'd improvise with gym equipment, and if your gym doesn't have a calve raising machine then you'd use the smith machine with the aerobic step, use the bar to help you balance as you elevate your body using only your tip toes to raise your body, which you should feel a concentrated burn within your calve muscles. Go easy to begin with, and then rep it out to the max. Do as many as you feel comfortable with

If at the gym and on the smith machine, start adding weight to that bar and smash it out ;)


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Calve raises to put it simply, but if you're not training in the gym you can just use an elevated platform, whether it be an aerobic step or a mere concrete slab. You'll have your feet around 30cm apart and only your tip toes placed on the edge of the platform, so you'll need something to help you balance.

This is where you'd improvise with gym equipment, and if your gym doesn't have a calve raising machine then you'd use the smith machine with the aerobic step, use the bar to help you balance as you elevate your body using only your tip toes to raise your body, which you should feel a concentrated burn within your calve muscles. Go easy to begin with, and then rep it out to the max. Do as many as you feel comfortable with

If at the gym and on the smith machine, start adding weight to that bar and smash it out ;)


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It's just that? I heard you should do not just one kind of exercise ("you" is not personal), is that true?
 

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@Witch of Karma

Why do you want bigger calves is the question that should be asked first. If you are seeking only the calf muscle because it's underdeveloped in comparison to other muscles, then isolating the muscle while training it is how it's done. Isolating muscles is great at working on your weak spots.

However if you want functional muscle fitness, then you want to do squats and work your entire legs in one motion. I would recommend calisthenics however calisthenics is not particularly good at training your leg strength.

You should also work on your flexibility with dorsiflexion and plantar flexion to avoid injury. You can google what those words mean and how to stretch effectively.
 
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I am really surprised more people here don't practice yoga, though. I believe it's one of the healthiest things you can do for yourself. Geesh, working out isn't all that there is.
Yoga is great. Have you tried Pilates? It was designed with the idea that training the abdomen is the most important part of fitness because that's where every motion starts from. And I agree with that idea.

Yoga really helps with my back muscles and my shoulder + hip flexibility.
 

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@Witch of Karma

Why do you want bigger calves is the question that should be asked first. If you are seeking only the calf muscle because it's underdeveloped in comparison to other muscles, then isolating the muscle while training it is how it's done. Isolating muscles is great at working on your weak spots.
That's what I want...
However if you want functional muscle fitness, then you want to do squats and work your entire legs in one motion. I would recommend calisthenics however calisthenics is not particularly good at training your leg strength.
...though that would be nice too. What exercises do you suggest?
You should also work on your flexibility with dorsiflexion and plantar flexion to avoid injury. You can google what those words mean and how to stretch effectively.
Thanks!
 

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It's just that? I heard you should do not just one kind of exercise ("you" is not personal), is that true?
Well of course there's different exercises, but what's your level of experience? If you're completely amateur and wondering how to build calve muscle then I'm giving you the very basic. It's more than enough to make your calves grow because unless you're competing you don't need to have a vast variety of calve muscle exercises because as long as you rep the shit out of them and add weight then they're going to grow regardless.

Yes, If I were training and isolating the bigger body parts then I'd do from 4-6 different exercises. You have to keep in mind that calve muscles are constantly getting worked out while you're walking so it's not something I'd stress over for beginner trainers, but if it's your personal preference to isolate and get your calves bigger then just start with what I told you. It's enough.

Also, having your tip toes pointed in different angles is going to work different sides of the calve muscles, you can work it out. If you want to get really serious about it you can let me know. Otherwise it's best not to complicate things.


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How much MSG is too much?

Are there any negative health effects to the sulfur used on dried fruit?
 

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Squats shouldn't be felt in the knees. Look at your style again. The ass should be working the most.

Stretching is excellent to do while showering (be careful, do not over stretch (you'll notice it if you do thou), slippery too).
A bit late, but Glutes and Quads, glutes and quads. Just poking ya with a bit of my off-brand humor.
 
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Just a bit of advice before I forget about it: Do not ignore working your obliques.

Got into an argument with a fellow gym-goer over this very subject. They kept going on and on about how training them ruins their v-taper (and makes them look fat) and can ruin a womans figure and that EVERYONE will benefit in not training them.

Facts about training the obliques
1) You should never ignore a specific muscle when it comes to training your core, especially in regards to strength. It helps in the long run. If even one component of your core is weak, it weakens the core as a whole.
2)Yes, you "can" wind up looking boxy, but only if you are training them like a strongman/powerlifter would.
3)If you think it is making you look boxy figure-wise, don't ignore them. Drop some of the resistance if you want but I would honestly tell you to do a bit more cardio, watch your diet and get your body fat percentage down a little bit more. If that doesn't completely fix it, work on your lats more along with your legs (do more squats).
 

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Just a bit of advice before I forget about it: Do not ignore working your obliques.

Got into an argument with a fellow gym-goer over this very subject. They kept going on and on about how training them ruins their v-taper (and makes them look fat) and can ruin a womans figure and that EVERYONE will benefit in not training them.

Facts about training the obliques
1) You should never ignore a specific muscle when it comes to training your core, especially in regards to strength. It helps in the long run. If even one component of your core is weak, it weakens the core as a whole.
2)Yes, you "can" wind up looking boxy, but only if you are training them like a strongman/powerlifter would.
3)If you think it is making you look boxy figure-wise, don't ignore them. Drop some of the resistance if you want but I would honestly tell you to do a bit more cardio, watch your diet and get your body fat percentage down a little bit more. If that doesn't completely fix it, work on your lats more along with your legs (do more squats).
I would like to add that isometric work is the best for your core. It really helps balance out all the different muscles going on in there which keeps things functional and proportional. It's also a hell of a lot safer than crunches and stuff that can hurt your back if not done perfectly.
 
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I would like to add that isometric work is the best for your core. It really helps balance out all the different muscles going on in there which keeps things functional and proportional. It's also a hell of a lot safer than crunches and stuff that can hurt your back if not done perfectly.
Yeah I forgot to mention isometrics (which can work extremely well depending on ones routine, so thanks for throwing that in. Wasn't thinking about adding them as a good example due to using my own routine as a reference point. Planks (and their various forms) are a good example, especially with good form and holding them for a good length of time. I know sandbag exercises are not all isometric but there is plenty of great core exercises you can do with them, particularly with a SKLZ super sandbag or similar (hell even just a regular sandbag). For lower back, one often-ignored exercises is doing back hyperextensions on a bench (use just bodyweight or a low amount of extra resistance such as 1-10lbs), however do not use a hyperextension machine for them, you can easily mess your back up on them.

Yup, form is important no matter what exercise it is.
 
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does anyone know anything about this stuff?

Mostly it's just that my hands, and legs (not considering my back) are all kind of mildly sore a lot of the time and also I think i gave myself runners knee or something because it hurts (but mostly is irritated then anything) and feels weird and irksome. Plus, underneath my thighs feel sore all of the time and stiff for some reason and when I touch them they're really hard. I think I most have hurt myself somehow and I don't know what I've done. I've had these problems for years and the doctors just right it off or say it's because my feet are flat (but they are maybe just slightly? I wouldn't even call them flat)

plus, people injure themselves all the time, wtf.


Does injuring your leg mean for sure you have will need surgery? because it feels like I did something to do the muscles and everything. My legs feel so unbelievably gibbled. I would almost say, I hurt the muscles, ligaments more then anything. My knees don't bother me that much.
 

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does anyone know anything about this stuff?

Mostly it's just that my hands, and legs (not considering my back) are all kind of mildly sore a lot of the time and also I think i gave myself runners knee or something because it hurts (but mostly is irritated then anything) and feels weird and irksome. Plus, underneath my thighs feel sore all of the time and stiff for some reason and when I touch them they're really hard. I think I most have hurt myself somehow and I don't know what I've done. I've had these problems for years and the doctors just right it off or say it's because my feet are flat (but they are maybe just slightly? I wouldn't even call them flat)

plus, people injure themselves all the time, wtf.


Does injuring your leg mean for sure you have will need surgery? because it feels like I did something to do the muscles and everything. My legs feel so unbelievably gibbled. I would almost say, I hurt the muscles, ligaments more then anything. My knees don't bother me that much.
It sounds to me like you have bad posture. Strengthening your weaker muscles (especially abs) can help with that as well as stretching your larger/stronger muscles so they get support from your weaker muscles. The muscle being so hard is a sign that it's not very flexible which can lead to pain like you describe.

I would say focus primarily on ab strength, next on hip mobility, next on glute strength, and finally on hamstring + quad mobility. Strengthening your abs and glutes helps take pressure off your legs and back. Stretching your hamstrings and hips helps manage posture.

I dont know what's up with your hands. Maybe they aren't very stretched too. Or maybe you have arthritis. Probably they aren't very stretched though.
 

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I just started working out, I am a 26 years old male and I was prescribed Acetyl L-carnitine for nerve pain but I read about a number of it's benefits online [ workout benefits ] so I upped the dose from 500 mg per day to 1.5 g post workout but then in a few days I start getting these migraines in early morning, my GP says that Acetyl L-carnitine has probably nothing to do with that coz they migraines have never been reported as a side effect.

Now, I want to ask that if there can be some connection with workout and migraines ... at times I think that when I push too hard, I did felt some sort of a headache in the gym but I ignored in the heat of the moment.
 

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It sounds to me like you have bad posture. Strengthening your weaker muscles (especially abs) can help with that as well as stretching your larger/stronger muscles so they get support from your weaker muscles. The muscle being so hard is a sign that it's not very flexible which can lead to pain like you describe.

I would say focus primarily on ab strength, next on hip mobility, next on glute strength, and finally on hamstring + quad mobility. Strengthening your abs and glutes helps take pressure off your legs and back. Stretching your hamstrings and hips helps manage posture.

I dont know what's up with your hands. Maybe they aren't very stretched too. Or maybe you have arthritis. Probably they aren't very stretched though.

I used to walk everywhere all of the time, plus running, long boarding, and all cycling a fair amount and sometimes hiking.

Are you sure it's just weak muscles? I also used to go to the gym on a regular basis for a couple of years. I'm still in fairly good shape, but definitely not compared to before. I think I could have some arthritis in some areas due to hurting myself.



Is it true though that if you hurt yourself in an area and it causes chronic pain on and off does that mean that it will stay like that for life? is there any methods to relieve the pain at all or to lessen it at all besides drugs? I never had any pain in my body until I started becoming physically active on a regular basis.
 
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