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That is actually the number 1 cause of injury in runners. To much exuberance. Your body needs time to adjust and people just get all wonky and add to much mileage, to fast. Its a great way to get Runners knee.
 

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Running can be brutal. Walking is just as good without the injury potential.

Among my friends, cycling is king. I can't do it because of neck injuries. I still run, but I can see the possibility that my running days are numbered. The last two years I have been nursing a torn peroneal tendon and consequent heel bursitis and achilles tendonitis. I can't go as far or as fast as I used to. There is this movement toward minimal shoes and even barefoot running, which I can do. But recently it makes my heel hurt a lot even though I never heel-strike.

If you have never run before, it might not always be the best idea to take it up. You can really get hurt if you don't have good form and you overdo it.

Handstand pushups? Only in my dreams.
 

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I know there are a lot of myths floating around about heart rate. I'm a 23 year old female. What should my heart rate be at during my cardio workouts?
Heart rate is highly individual. Conventional wisdom says subtract your age from 220 to get your max. You should train at levels below 85% of that. In my case, I can easily maintain a heart rate that is considerably higher than my calculated maximum. I have been stress tested three times and was able to maintain a heart rate over 200 with zero stress on my heart. The last time I ran for 25 minutes on an inclined treadmill at a maximum heart rate of 204 and my blood pressure never got higher than 130/90. I am 55 years old, so you can do the math. My cardiologist told me not to come back because he doesn't have any equipment that can stress my heart and he said I just have abnormal physiology. But that would not be a benchmark that others should attempt to duplicate.

What you want to do is figure out what your training zones are and if you want to be methodical in your training, use a heart rate monitor to ensure you stay in the range you want for the objectives of each workout. This is one of the great contributions Lance Armstrong has made to athletic training (alleged PED use notwithstanding). Here are some sites that might be helpful.

Heart Rate Zones

http://www.thewalkingsite.com/thr.html
 

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@killerB and @Souled In and anyone else who might know:

So my quad isn't really sore any more. It's a little stiff, but not really sore. I still have been taking it really easy, only doing some Tai Chi here and there and then a 10 minute walk a day. But last night I was trying to get up from a really low seat and I got some serious pain in both my quad AND my hamstring (I think it is... it's the muscle opposite the quad, back of leg just below where the butt starts). Do you think this could be related to the previous injury (when I initially hurt myself on Sunday there was pain in the back of my leg, but that was gone almost immediately)? Does this warrant going in to the doctor? If I do go in, will they have me do certain stretches/poses to determine what is injured, or will they x-ray (it's probably both, lol)?

Thanks in advance for all help provided!
 

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Can anyone do handstand push-ups? I want to do those...
Those are nuts. If you're really desperate to be able to do them, the military press would be a great training exercise. Just... don't just do military press, because you'll be freakishly proportioned with enormous shoulders on a skinny frame.

I really hate running.

I have another rather cardio-intensive activity that I love; so is running as necessary as I feel like it's made out to be?
I hate running, too. If I'm ever desperate to do cardio (I rarely am), I go to my apartment's pool and swim laps.
 

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@killerB and @Souled In and anyone else who might know:

So my quad isn't really sore any more. It's a little stiff, but not really sore. I still have been taking it really easy, only doing some Tai Chi here and there and then a 10 minute walk a day. But last night I was trying to get up from a really low seat and I got some serious pain in both my quad AND my hamstring (I think it is... it's the muscle opposite the quad, back of leg just below where the butt starts). Do you think this could be related to the previous injury (when I initially hurt myself on Sunday there was pain in the back of my leg, but that was gone almost immediately)? Does this warrant going in to the doctor? If I do go in, will they have me do certain stretches/poses to determine what is injured, or will they x-ray (it's probably both, lol)?

Thanks in advance for all help provided!
If you are still having pain and discomfort, then it is most definately time to go get it looked at. The Doc will usually press and prod a bit, and can tell by where the pain is as to what the problem is. They will often do a MRI, which is quick and painless. You are correct by the way that the opposite muscle of the Quad is the Hamstring.
 

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I read somewhere that human beings can outrun a horse or I think any animal for that matter. What I mean by that is distance, the horse would die of exhaustion before the human. Humans were built for long distance running. I don't have any evidence..yet
 
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