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Do you 'hear' a voice when you're reading?
Yes!

It's called subvocalisation and I was amazed to learn that a lot of people don't read in this way.

It saddens me to think that some people don't have an internal world that can be illuminated and brought to life via reading. I mean, what do they think when they're looking at a page of text? Surely it's normal to give voices to characters and apply abstract concepts to everything as you go along? What do these people do instead? Just look at the words? It baffles me.
 

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Not exactly "hear." But I can feel the rhythm, in my chest. This was good when I was an editor, because I could easily feel when a sentence was too long or short, too staccato, etc.

You might think that as an editor I would be a fast reader, but I'm slow. There is just so much to experience on a page. Not only the meaning, but also the type font and everything else.
 

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Yes!

It's called subvocalisation and I was amazed to learn that a lot of people don't read in this way.

It saddens me to think that some people don't have an internal world that can be illuminated and brought to life via reading. I mean, what do they think when they're looking at a page of text? Surely it's normal to give voices to characters and apply abstract concepts to everything as you go along? What do these people do instead? Just look at the words? It baffles me.
Apparently it's not a good thing, slows down reading etc.
While I am a bit of a book addict/collector, it does actually explain why I always considered myself a very bad reader actually (slow, backtracking, distracted, rarely in the 'flow' of things).

Another point is that the words I'm mispronouncing (not being a native speaker), I'm also reading wrong in my head.
 
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Not exactly "hear." But I can feel the rhythm, in my chest. This was good when I was an editor, because I could easily feel when a sentence was too long or short, too staccato, etc.

You might think that as an editor I would be a fast reader, but I'm slow. There is just so much to experience on a page. Not only the meaning, but also the type font and everything else.
Hm-hu.
And I'd say hearing the words would be a great asset for a writer. Where good 'voice' comes from, literally.
 

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Apparently it's not a good thing, slows down reading etc.
While I am a bit of a book addict/collector, it does actually explain why I always considered myself a very bad reader actually (slow, backtracking, distracted, rarely in the 'flow' of things).

Another point is that the words I'm mispronouncing (not being a native speaker), I'm also reading wrong in my head.
Damn, I always thought it was a good thing!

I think the context I 'discovered' the concept of subvocalisation was in language studies. People who subvocalise are able to practise speaking the language without even speaking it.

To be honest I don't think it's necessarily fair or correct to say that it's a bad thing though. Never in my life have I felt that I'm bad at reading, or that I need to read things faster in order to become better at processing and/or understanding information.
 

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What is a good example of two things that are mutually exclusive?

What is a good example of two things that aren't mutually exclusive?
 

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How much of an addictive personality do you guys have?

I don't know if it's an INTP thing or a 'me' thing but I've never been addicted to anything. Since my 20s I've smoked on and off, and sometimes quite heavily, but it's only ever been a "thing to do" to pass time when it seems convenient. I have no problem at all with stopping when I want to stop.

When corona lockdown started, I bought a pack of cigarettes and started smoking a bit because spring came around and I wanted an excuse to stand in the sun on my balcony. Then I got bored and just didn't buy any more cigarettes. I remember a few days later I got an obvious feeling of withdrawal, like I knew that it was my body reacting to the withdrawal of the nicotine, but I had no desire at all for a cigarette. I just felt uncomfortable for maybe a few hours, and that was it. Done. No more cigarettes. And no desire at all to go and desperately smoke to get "the feeling" (or whatever it is that smokers need when they smoke). I just stopped. Easy.

Also my China-UK transition: I smoked loads in China, fucking loads. It was cheap, it was a thing to do, and it's sadly still a big social lubricant over there. Anyway, when I returned to the UK I just stopped. Easy!

Is this an INTP thing? Any addicts here???
 

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Yes, big addict here. Not to drugs or alcohol, which I don't even like.

I'm addicted to cigarettes; I quit when smoking got too inconvenient and affected my health. I'm addicted to food, but I control it by eating only certain foods.

Other things too.
 
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