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Do you prefer to go to the classroom and listen to the professor's lectures or get a general feel of the class and learn everything basically by yourself at your own pace? Yeah, you can do both, but which do you prefer. Or is there any other way?
 

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It depends. If I am EXTREMELY interested in a topic, I will be motivated enough to learn it by myself. Usually however, that does not happen. Otherwise, lectures are useful to me but only if it is presented intuitively. I am in an introductory econ class and we write what she says in pre-printed slides and regurgitate this for the test. KILL ME.
 

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Personally, for undergrad I mostly memorized everything a few days before, word or number vomited on the test, and then forgot it.
 

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In the classroom I play angry birds on my phone and let my subconscious take everything in, while I wonder how would it be for some birds to be able to detonate themselves as last resort and make predators think twice before attacking.

Then I read the material at home, and fall sleep, dream about it and when I wake up I know all the answers...

I just let Ti and Ne do all the work. Seriously, I just make abstractions of what the lecturer is saying, scan the material to fill in the details, think about it a bit, and sleep it over.

Actively studying doesn't work for me because I am laaaazyyy... so I take one bit here one bit there, give it some time and the knowledge builds up itself.

In case all of the above fails and I go blank in the exam, I use Ne to come up with the most creative BS and Ti to make it sound coherent.
 

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I do (most) of my assigned reading, and I listen to the professor. I'm not much of a note-taker, but I do so occasionally when the material is sufficiently complicated or convoluted to warrant going back and looking it over again later.

When I was in undergrad, though, I mostly just half-listened in class and did my own experiments in the lab.
 

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It depends on the class and the teaching style.

I took a meteorology class one semester and I hated to miss, even though I could just read the material in the book and use the internet and pulled a C+ or a B, which is usually good enough for me. But I loved the teacher, and I loved the teaching style, so I had almost perfect attendance. I may have even had perfect attendance.

But in my linear algebra class (I'm a math major, that's worth nothing) I got SO sick of going to class because I hated listening to the teacher talk. His rambling confused me and he wasn't accurate enough, so I found it a lot easier to study the material out of the book and teach myself.
 

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In undergraduate, I studied Economics, it's a very intuitive subject that really only requires some practice of the mathematical elements. I was usually pretty good about attending most classes and then just spending a couple hours studying for the exams. I never did the assigned reading in undergrad and i was fine.
I do all the assigned reading and go to most classes in law school. I spend several hours preparing for finals but that is because my expectations for grades are much higher than they were in undergraduate. I would say i average 20+ hours of independent study in addition to class time where I reread the cases and my notes. With that said, I really love the subject matter so I find it much easier to stay motivated plus I want a scholarship because it's just too damn expensive.
Memorization has never been my thing, I just have no patience for it so I would never study something that was purely memorization. I aim to learn the underlying purpose or goal of a concept so that everything that follows falls into place.
 

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I do (most) of my assigned reading, and I listen to the professor. I'm not much of a note-taker, but I do so occasionally when the material is sufficiently complicated or convoluted to warrant going back and looking it over again later.

When I was in undergrad, though, I mostly just half-listened in class and did my own experiments in the lab.
How I imagine you, doing your own experiments in the lab:

 

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Always, always, always by myself.

Just give me the books and leave me alone.

At one point in high school they let me do independent study (it was usually a punishment) and my grades improved immediately.
 

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I suppose at my own pace... I did opt for quite a few independent courses and APs.

But... I'd also get my textbooks and spend maybe a weekend skimming through them (before school started), answering the chapter questions and writing up a couple reports ahead of time. Though I did have one teacher that ripped up my reports upon discovering I did it in advance. And there's the usual shit that few, if any class, ever goes through the entire textbook... but other teachers were willing to give me extra credit for the work anyway.

Though I did significantly better on tests than I did with regular coursework.
 

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How I imagine you, doing your own experiments in the lab:

Allow me to ruin your vision... it was a networking/computer lab. My "experiements" would be applying what I learned to do fun, but useless things... like configuring a PBX to play Mary Had A Little Lamb with all the different phones hooked up to it, or setting up the most ridiculously inefficient routing paths between a couple routers using a protocol that is designed for efficiency just to see if it is possible.
 

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I am starting to learn that if I listen to a lecture and play some random game on my phone....I somehow get the material. I am not sure why or how, it just works better that way (I guess it keeps me from going into my head and completely ignoring EVERYTHING).
 

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I have a strong preference for sitting in lecture and listening, mostly because I'm lazy and working through things myself in the textbook takes work. However, if the class is sufficiently low on information density ("Hello class, we are going to cover 1.5 pages of material in as many hours") and I can get the slides or know what in the book we are covering, I will prefer to cover things myself. If the class is sufficiently advanced, I end up doing both.
 

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I pay money for school, so I might as well learn something while I’m there. In classrooms, I’ll listen, read the material and do the work. If the subject is interesting, I’ll ask questions and put forth ideas and debate. It helps the time go by quickly and I become more involved in what I’m doing. If the class is boring, I don’t really want to do much. Usually I have to trick myself into liking the class, and after a while, I can gain something worthwhile from the subject.

A lot of times, though, it’s not so much the subject, but how the teacher teaches. I really enjoy teachers who are laid-back and open for discussion. One of my philosophy teachers is probably an INTP because he rambles about awesome ideas, makes sarcastic comments, and always forgets to give assignments. He’s really open about grading, which gives me a lot of room to procrastinate. On the other hand, I have an INTJ teacher who has documents and formats to abide by. He’s really inflexible about grading. The classes they teach are awesome but their styles make me respond differently.
 

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Allow me to ruin your vision... it was a networking/computer lab. My "experiements" would be applying what I learned to do fun, but useless things... like configuring a PBX to play Mary Had A Little Lamb with all the different phones hooked up to it, or setting up the most ridiculously inefficient routing paths between a couple routers using a protocol that is designed for efficiency just to see if it is possible.
The second experiment sounds rather entertaining. What were your results?
 

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The second experiment sounds rather entertaining. What were your results?
The routing tables were so complicated that the routers couldn't process the outgoing packets fast enough to keep up with the incoming packets, so within about 90 seconds they all started throwing buffer overflows and it crashed the whole network. My professor thought it was pretty funny, but he always enjoyed my shenanigans.
 
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I pay money for school, so I might as well learn something while I’m there. In classrooms, I’ll listen, read the material and do the work. If the subject is interesting, I’ll ask questions and put forth ideas and debate. It helps the time go by quickly and I become more involved in what I’m doing. If the class is boring, I don’t really want to do much. Usually I have to trick myself into liking the class, and after a while, I can gain something worthwhile from the subject.

A lot of times, though, it’s not so much the subject, but how the teacher teaches. I really enjoy teachers who are laid-back and open for discussion. One of my philosophy teachers is probably an INTP because he rambles about awesome ideas, makes sarcastic comments, and always forgets to give assignments. He’s really open about grading, which gives me a lot of room to procrastinate. On the other hand, I have an INTJ teacher who has documents and formats to abide by. He’s really inflexible about grading. The classes they teach are awesome but their styles make me respond differently.
This is pretty much what I'm like. I don't always read all the material (especially if I find it irrelevant or regurgitated in class), but I like to take detailed notes. I learn best when I'm writing down information and rarely re-read my notes. I also found that I learn best when I teach information to others. If I can't do that, I feel like I don't understand it and need to re-learn parts of it. But if I can make analogies and explain it, then I feel pretty good about it and just spend the rest of the time gathering additional bits.

I think my current professor is either an ENTP or INTP too, because she loves to jump from idea to idea in this hilarious little anecdotes connected to the information. I find teachers kind of hard to peg on the extrovert/introvert scale since the job entails a lot of extroverting.
 
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