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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I don’t know whether this has been asked already (I’m sure it has) but I figured I would ask anyway based on my own background.
I am 23 years old and earned my BA in Psychology two years ago. For the past two years I took a break from schooling as I needed to take some time off for personal reasons (getting my life in check and whatnot) but I am eagerly ready to go back to school. Whatever career path I choose I would love to use my background in psychology somehow, but I would also love to be able to use my creativity. I have always been really creative and enjoyed a group dynamic when working on projects and at jobs. The last maybe six years of my life has been me trying to find out what I want to do in psychology and what specific career path to narrow down to. I have changed from wanting to be a therapist to a neuropsychologist to an industrial-organizational psychologist to a school psychologist. Mainly I was not sure what I wanted to do and I never really came to a conclusion by the time graduation came around. My guess is that none of those career paths really seemed like something I wanted to do in the long run or something that I can see myself doing with passion and energy until I retire, and that is why I subconsciously did not have the drive to choose anything specific or do some type of an internship.
That leaves me with a few questions, and I hope someone will be able to answer at least some of them:
1. What kind of careers can use psychology AND creativity (new ideas, imagination, etc.) perhaps in the business world?
2. What type of degree would complement a psych degree to better my chances of getting a job? (I know that I will most likely have to earn another degree AND more school after that).
3. Is it too late to change it up as I am already 23 years old? I don’t know if many people have been that successful after changing it up so late.
4. I currently have a full time job that has decent pay (I mainly have it just to pay the bills and get by). How difficult would it be to do all of this and possibly an internship as I know I will HAVE to do that to better my chances at landing a great job?
Sorry if this is a bit much…I’m just nervous as I really really REALLY want to make the right career move for me in order to use all my strengths and talents so that I will be sure to enjoy what I do for the rest of my life and not feel like I wasted any more time on a job that I will either hate or not find enjoyable.
Any help is greatly appreciated!
Thank you :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
It seems that my work computer has meshed some words together...sorry about that! Hope it isn't too difficult to read. :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nobody? :(
 

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I'm in a similar position, B.S. though. And I just got it in the winter. I did a bio minor and also hopped around with ideas of what I wanted to do. Started out with a bio major and then switched to psych, had a freakout that I'd probably need a Ph.D to do what I wanted to do, started looking at chiropractor and other health schools to avoid a Ph.D program... lol. I'm back with research now but looking at market research myself. That would be my choice if I can't find something in medical/neuroscience. Part of me feels like I'm not passionate about anything at this point, so I'm just sticking with what I kept falling back on and the fact I've often spent my "free time" reading neuro studies on the internet :p

Not too familiar with marketing psych, per se, but I was looking into a neuroeconomics lab - seems really competitive at Bachelor's level, though. Market research probably allows for more creativity than an academic setting would with a college degree.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you! Looks interesting. I'll have to look into those.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm in a similar position, B.S. though. And I just got it in the winter. I did a bio minor and also hopped around with ideas of what I wanted to do. Started out with a bio major and then switched to psych, had a freakout that I'd probably need a Ph.D to do what I wanted to do, started looking at chiropractor and other health schools to avoid a Ph.D program... lol. I'm back with research now but looking at market research myself. That would be my choice if I can't find something in medical/neuroscience. Part of me feels like I'm not passionate about anything at this point, so I'm just sticking with what I kept falling back on and the fact I've often spent my "free time" reading neuro studies on the internet :p

Not too familiar with marketing psych, per se, but I was looking into a neuroeconomics lab - seems really competitive at Bachelor's level, though. Market research probably allows for more creativity than an academic setting would with a college degree.
Yeah, I was like you and thought I wanted to do the whole "medical" route but then realized there isnt much use of creativity. Market research sounds interesting enough. I'll have to look into that as well. I just don't want to feel like I wasted all that time on a psych degree...I'm sure you feel the same way lol
 
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Yeah, I was like you and thought I wanted to do the whole "medical" route but then realized there isnt much use of creativity. Market research sounds interesting enough. I'll have to look into that as well. I just don't want to feel like I wasted all that time on a psych degree...I'm sure you feel the same way lol
Lol, I spend a lot of time messing with the wording on my resumes and cover letters, so if it's a market research job, I emphasize stats background. If it's clinical research or something like that, I emphasize bio and clinical psych classes. Part of the challenge for me is how many directions I can possibly go in. I don't want to go in the "wrong" one and limit my options for career growth.

It seems like academic research is really only creative after you've spent years in school and doing post-docs. Right now I don't feel confident saying I'm in love with a subject enough to go that far with it. Eventually I am thinking about a Master's, though.

If I can get some work experience in stats, databases/data collection and possibly tech, I think it would leave me with the best number of options as far as research-type jobs. Some organizations that do nonpartisan policy research looked interesting too, I just have yet to have any luck with that. A lot of them do specify Psych as one of the majors they look for, though. What I find appealing about industry research is that they often have it organized so you're working with a team and you're not just going through motions to put someone else's ideas together (i.e. no creativity).
 

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Have you considered becoming a career counselor? You might be able to do it with a bachelor's degree but you'd have to look into that more.

Something you should know about it is that it isn't just about giving clients career inventories and personality tests, or brainstorming job ideas. Career counseling involves a lot of communication with your client, asking questions and gathering information about their career history, what it was they liked or disliked about certain work environments and why, their preferred style of exploration and decision-making, etc. It involves a lot of analysis and pulling from many different systems and theories of career decision-making.

Here are just a few of the systems and theories you might work with as a career counselor:

-MBTI
-Hollands Theory (Holland’s Theory of Career Choice | Career Key)
-Brown's Values-Based Theory (Brown's Values-Based Career Theory : SAGE Knowledge)
-Super's Theory (Super's theory)
-Krumboltz's Social Learning Theory (Lifestyle and Career Development: KRUMBOLTZ’S SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY)

I'm not a career counselor myself, but I am currently taking a course in career counseling, which is why I know these things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Lol, I spend a lot of time messing with the wording on my resumes and cover letters, so if it's a market research job, I emphasize stats background. If it's clinical research or something like that, I emphasize bio and clinical psych classes. Part of the challenge for me is how many directions I can possibly go in. I don't want to go in the "wrong" one and limit my options for career growth.

It seems like academic research is really only creative after you've spent years in school and doing post-docs. Right now I don't feel confident saying I'm in love with a subject enough to go that far with it. Eventually I am thinking about a Master's, though.

If I can get some work experience in stats, databases/data collection and possibly tech, I think it would leave me with the best number of options as far as research-type jobs. Some organizations that do nonpartisan policy research looked interesting too, I just have yet to have any luck with that. A lot of them do specify Psych as one of the majors they look for, though. What I find appealing about industry research is that they often have it organized so you're working with a team and you're not just going through motions to put someone else's ideas together (i.e. no creativity).
I understand what you mean about going into the wrong career. That is what I am afraid of too and probably why I have spent so much time going back and forth. If we just pick a direction and go with it I know that we can do it! You sound very intelligent so I know that you would be able to go far in whatever career path you choose. I think one of the biggest things is just finding that special "ah-ha!" moment with something...but it sounds like we are both in the same boat and haven't exactly found that yet. Or we just have way too many interests and want to do everything haha
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Have you considered becoming a career counselor? You might be able to do it with a bachelor's degree but you'd have to look into that more.

Something you should know about it is that it isn't just about giving clients career inventories and personality tests, or brainstorming job ideas. Career counseling involves a lot of communication with your client, asking questions and gathering information about their career history, what it was they liked or disliked about certain work environments and why, their preferred style of exploration and decision-making, etc. It involves a lot of analysis and pulling from many different systems and theories of career decision-making.

Here are just a few of the systems and theories you might work with as a career counselor:

-MBTI
-Hollands Theory (Holland’s Theory of Career Choice | Career Key)
-Brown's Values-Based Theory (Brown's Values-Based Career Theory : SAGE Knowledge)
-Super's Theory (Super's theory)
-Krumboltz's Social Learning Theory (Lifestyle and Career Development: KRUMBOLTZ’S SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY)

I'm not a career counselor myself, but I am currently taking a course in career counseling, which is why I know these things.
Those sound interesting. I'm always up for anything that involves helping other people. It's kinda funny though...me helping someone try and find a career path when I can't even figure out my own! :tongue:
 
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