Personality Cafe banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The last "Sherlock" thread was from back in April, and I didn't feel like resurrecting for one character so yeah. :3 There's not a lot of characters that interest me enough to write out descriptions for, but genius SPs are rare enough in fiction that I wanna see 'em defended. Let 'er rip, y'all...

Why I think BBC’s Jim Moriarty is ESFP:
I know a lot of eyebrows are going up on this one, because I’ve only seen one other typing out there that labels him an SP and not an NT, and even that typing was ESTP. But from the first time I saw and heard him, the villain simply reeked of Se and Fi. Over time, as his unusual style of evilness baffled the MBTI world more and more, these vibes I got from him grew even stronger. Here is a function-by-function explanation of why I think this typing fits him…

First, an observation… One of the reasons I think it’s so hard for people to type Jim Moriarty is because we have almost nothing to compare him to. If he’s ESFP, this makes sense. Not only is the fiction world virtually absent of ESFP bad guys, but even the good ESFPs tend to be represented as rather lacking in intelligence. So a smart, evil ESFP is going to look very different from most other ESFPs you know, simply because you’ve never really seen one before. I urge you, therefore, to put your ESFP biases aside and consider Moriarty on the basis of his apparent COGNITIVE PROCESS (i.e., functions), which is the angle I will be approaching him from.

Se: Notice where Moriarty gets his biggest thrills in the BBC series. It’s from DOING, not from planning or watching his ideas come to fruition. He lives every moment richly and completely, in a disturbing, twisted kind of way. Note the entire sequence of crimes in the beginning of “The Reichenbach Fall”: he literally indulges in his crime, enjoying every second listening to his headphones, drawing silly smiley-face notes, using power tools, dressing up like a king in stolen garb, and lounging in a chair waiting for the authorities, luxuriating in his own epicness. He seems to set up every crime (except for the boring work) with his own hands, using his charm and connections and guileless smile to get everywhere he wants. He loves being the center of attention, the guy with all the hot connects. He’s a natural performer and even enjoys pretending to be stupid and innocent, which no NT villain I know has ever stooped to. His trademark as a villain is the wide range of his noises, singing, dramatic gestures, laughs, funny faces, sudden and terrible shouting, giggles and vocal sound effects—all things normal ESFPs love to use. He wants to be where the action is at and is usually on the scene himself, even if in a disguise, relishing the chance to watch his victims’ reactions. Easily bored, he wants everything to be fun and funny, and gets frustrated when the action slows down at all. When this happens, he prods Sherlock with a text or throws in some kind of weird twist to get his nemesis moving again and get that adrenaline pumping. He loves competition and the thrill of the chase like only an SP would—notice, he gets the angriest when he thinks Sherlock is overwhelmed (NTs love overwhelming with their impressiveness) because that means he’s lost his toy, and must therefore return to his lonely, boring world full of games he’s already exploited.

QUOTES:
• “It's raining. It's pouring. Sherlock is boring. I'm laughing. I'm crying. Sherlock is dying.”
• “In a world of locked rooms, the man with the key is king. And honey, you should see me in a crown.”
• “Did you miss me?”

Fi: This guy’s temper tantrums are legendary. Violent, short, and intolerant, like only Fi-tantrums can be. Also note that Fi is a vulnerable function, which hates to be pried into. Moriarty gets violent on the defensive, making things personal real quick when he thinks Sherlock is prying into places Moriarty doesn’t want him to touch. There is a simple, honest, childish quality to Fi that makes even its most brilliant users behave like children; when poorly controlled, Fi-users can become slaves to their quick-changing moods. In an NT, the feeling function is weak and usually repressed, something the NT is embarrassed to show, but Moriarty is unashamed and even seems to enjoy following his intense passions. Further, Fi-users receive much enjoyment from making others’ feelings their own, since this is the easiest way to get the intense emotional stimulation they crave. In a psychopathic and distorted Fi-user, this often manifests itself as forcing other individuals to undergo suffering in order to get a rise off their pain. It’s selfish, childish, and cruel, and these words describe Moriarty to a T. Or should I say…an F. ;p Notice how much Moriarty wants to cause Sherlock emotional pain (turning John against him, making Sherlock feel responsible for victims’ deaths, painting Sherlock as someone he’s not), and gets angry if Sherlock refuses to show any. T-types usually engage their opponents on an intellectual level, but Moriarty knows Sherlock has a heart even when Sherlock doesn’t, and that is the playing field Moriarty wants to win on. Moriarty’s plots are sensational and huge in nature, but they are fundamentally directed towards one individual, which makes sense for someone who seeks individual meaning and pleasure (SeFi) in a competitive setting.

QUOTES:
• “Sorry, boys! I'm sooooo changeable! It's a weakness with me, but to be fair to myself, it is my only weakness.”
• “Big client list. Rogue governments. Intelligence communities. Terror cells. They all want me. Suddenly, I'm Mr. Sex.”
• “If you don't stop prying … I will burn you. I will burn THE HEART out of you.”

Te: A weak function in ESFPs that can make them deeply uncomfortable with disharmony and easily angered if people disagree with them. ESFPs don’t take criticism well, especially if they feel they’re being accused or threatened. Unhealthy ESFPs can hide a secret rage and anger beneath their playful, laid-back Se exterior, which occasionally explodes out uncontrollably. Vulnerable Fi will lash out using Te expressions as a form of self-protection, and this is obvious in Moriarty. In “The Great Game,” when Sherlock even hints that Moriarty doesn’t have a right to kill people for his own pleasure (Sherlock attacking runaway Fi with Fe), Moriarty explodes in his face. Like most ESFPs, Moriarty has a hidden distaste for inefficiency and dislikes it if he feels his fun took too much effort.

QUOTES:
• “I've shown you what I can do - I cut loose all those people, all those little problems, even thirty million quid just to get you to come out and play - so take this as a friendly warning... my dear: Back off.”
• “That's what people DO!”
• “DADDY'S HAD ENOUGH NOW.”

Ni: ESFPs wield Ni’s far-seeing and deep-searching eye in a rather hit-or-miss manner. Their Te makes them dislike feeling incompetent, and while ESFPs get a thrill when their hastily-concocted plans work out, they are baffled and frustrated at failures. They can revel in their own perceived genius, but in hindsight can be perplexed that others didn’t pick up the poorly-laid hints and clues they thought they laid down. Their foresight and planning can be extremely effective if the ESFP takes the time to look ahead and pay attention to the details since dominant Se makes them unusually good at knowing what is necessary to make things work, but their impatience to figure it out as they go along (Se) can sabotage their own efforts. A good example of an ESFP using Ni would be Lupin III from the cartoon film, “The Castle of Cagliostro.” Intelligent ESFPs are often much better at wielding Ni that one might expect, since IQ seems to enhance one’s ability to see and predict patterns, even in S-types. Moriarty is a perfect example of a brilliant SP who uses his ability to plan to indulge his love of competition, excitement and drama, and loves feeling clever for being about to do this.

QUOTES:
• “There is no key, DOOFUS!”
• “Although I have loved this, this little game of ours - playing Jim from I.T., playing GAY. Did you like the little touch with the underwear?”

ESFP vs ENTP: A lot of individuals who appreciate his spontaneity and flexible planning style type him as ENTP. While I will go more in-depth into how fourth-function Ni plays a role in Moriarty’s planning process, at this point a simple comparison of ENTP vs ESFP “evil goals” is useful. Compare Moriarty to the Joker, the villain who is most similar to Moriarty and who is an ENTP.
Like Moriarty, the Joker has a chaotic style that is very intense and seemingly spontaneous; both bad guys have no other apparent plan than to produce a certain kind of effect in their audience. The Joker’s audience is all of Gotham: he wants a universal (Ne) randomness/inconsistency (Ti) imposed on the city. He wants everyone to think they are the helpless victims of a random, unpredictable terror that can strike them any moment. He often distorts the normal way things are done (Si) to enhance this sense of random terror, such as when he destroys a hospital (which should be out-of-bounds) or when he tries to get the citizens and inmates to blow each other up by giving them each a bomb trigger. He picks the Batman as his nemesis because he wants someone to appreciate the genius of his system. He gets frustrated when a collective spirit of goodness (Fe, the ENTP’s tertiary weakness) unites the city against his plans and makes them go wrong.
Moriarty also inspires a general feeling of random terror, but it’s more of a byproduct of his actions that the goal of them. Interestingly, he’s content to enact heinous and violent crimes behind the scenes that most people never know about, simply enjoying the wealth and connections he makes, until he gets bored. He finally enters the limelight when he spies a bigger prize: competition. Moriarty is insanely competitive, in the way only an SP could be. He utilizes almost zero henchmen, which is the fiercely individualistic SP manner of doing things. (Note: The Joker didn’t mind using people as “pawns” or “tools,” as long as it was obvious the crimes were his ideas). When Moriarty does involve other people, it’s to enjoy their individual emotional reactions (Fi) as he forces them to undergo an intensely traumatic experience (Se), as when he tied random victims to bombs and forced them to wait to be saved (possibly an Ni thing, actually; SP’s weak Ni makes “time(lessness)” a kind of fascination for them). But Moriarty’s main drive is to watch Sherlock undergo intense personal suffering (Fi) from a constant bombardment of experiences (Se). He wants to watch the only people Sherlock loves come to distrust and hate him as something Sherlock is not, which is what Moriarty’s own Fi (all about authenticity and being truly understand as one’s own self) would abhor. He uses his own personal experience of what he would hate, and forces Sherlock to undergo it.

Finally, compare Moriarty to Sherlock. The most accurate and general consensus seems to be that Sherlock is an INTP, and I agree. But if Moriarty was also an NT, especially an ENTP, he should have been much easier for Sherlock to understand. But Sherlock was entirely nonplussed—the motivations and methods of Moriarty were a complete mystery to him. Note how the transmission of clues between the two of them was rough going, and Sherlock had to change his perspective quite a bit to figure out Moriarty’s logic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,687 Posts
I think the ENTP typings mostly come from his perceived similarities to The Joker, as well as associating his emotional manipulations as being automatically indicative of Fe. I came in ready to argue otherwise, but I'm partially convinced about him being an extremely immature Fi user. Still think he's a Ne dominant though. His preening reminds me of Roger from American Dad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
Why haven't you considered ENTJ? I actually thought ENTJ from the very first moment he appeared, but I don't think ESFP is an absurd guess, since they have the same functions.

I agree with many things you've said about Moriarty being Te/Ni/Se/Fi user, but I disagree with the order. 90% of your post is giving arguments that could apply to both ENTJ and ESFP.

Now, ENTP? I didn't even read your comparison with ENTP. Is that his most common typing? Seriously? Are people actually saying this guy uses Ti and Fe?

I could rule it out just looking at his complete lack of Fe, often killing people in the middle of the game just because of his selfish motivations, but let's go on. What are the crazy reasons for him being Ti user instead of Te? He's like the opposite of a passive Ti user.

Moriarty is constantly manipulating and organizing the world around him. The dominant Te of this guy is shown in every single episode to the tee. I don't need to give examples, he does it all the time. The world is his little chess table and he's the genius player who wants to control everything.

But oh, let me see why we have an ENTP x ESFP conflict here. He's funny and cool, so he can't be a J type. Sure! It's the same thing that happens to Tony Stark/Iron Man or Eric Cartman from South Park, fucking obvious ENTJs who are still typed as TPs every once in a while.

Being prone to tantrums when things don't go around as you wanted is not Fi marker, is general Te/Fi marker and I would say it's a lot more Te in his case. TJs can get pretty neurotic when they feel inefficient.

People have to understand that the tertiary function is not repressed. It's almost as high as the auxiliary. We all usually have a good equilibrium between our dominant and our auxiliary function.

So yeah, IxTJs are in touch with what they like and what they don't, ExTPs are very charismatic, ISxPs are in touch with their inner impressions of things, ExFPs can be very logical and organized, etc.

Same thing goes for ENxJs, they have a good equilibrium between Ni and Se, but they still prefer Ni. They keep thinking about what things could be, but still perceive them as they are. They plan what's going to happen, but still enjoy the moments.

ENTJs have tertiary Se that is not repressed, so they can be - and they actually are, I've seen it - just as playful and hedonistic as any other SP type. They are thrill-seekers, but this is not their primary motivation. It's just a mask they wear.

And when you put this characteristic together with a conquering, challenging Te dominance - making him want to win over every enemy's dead body -, you have a guy who shoots himself in the face when he thinks he's lost the game.

I know I didn't argue against everything you said, but it's because you wrote a lot. Sorry, but, since you haven't even considered ENTJ, I'm here saying this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Hmm... I honestly didn't consider ENTJ because his Se was so pronounced to me. But that is a type I am growing to appreciate more as a I learn more about them, so I am open to the possibility. Could you explain why you think tertiary Se would be a mask for Moriarty's auxiliary Ni, rather than his being an SP who has a high enough IQ to use Ni to indulge his dominant Se?

My immediate response would be to say that most of the highly intelligent ESxPs I know are very good at using their wits to achieve their choice pleasures (often associated with "winning" and being the "best") or for elaborate pranks that require mid-range vision, like Moriarty usually uses. ESxPs are fully capable of long term planning, but they don't enjoy the way Ni-types do, and tend to only do it when perceived as necessary. The only *long term* vision I noticed Moriarty exhibiting was hinted during the end of the last episode, but since it ended on a cliffhanger we don't even really know what happened. It seemed like his plans were at the service of his pleasures, rather than the other way around.
 

·
May Child
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
I find it hard to argue with him being an ENTJ, so I would have to agree. I find it really funny how TV characters which are so dramatised and exaggerated for our entertainment can be so complex and hard to figure out. I can't wait for more Sherlock!
 

·
Electronica Wizard
Joined
·
6,687 Posts
I find it hard to argue with him being an ENTJ, so I would have to agree. I find it really funny how TV characters which are so dramatised and exaggerated for our entertainment can be so complex and hard to figure out. I can't wait for more Sherlock!
I'm sorry that we may have to wait for a long time.. at least until 2016.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,850 Posts
Moriarty's entire purpose is to screw with people to get emotional reactions out of them. His plan is to generate chaos -- for no other reason than his own amusement. He emotionally manipulates and over-expresses himself to get reactions. He changes his plans on a whim and had a dozen secondary possibilities waiting in the wings. He is the ultimate troll.

Ti/Fe and high Ne. ENTP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Anyone familiar with the character of Izaya Orihara from "Durarara!"? Someone introduced me to him as an ENTJ in the vein of Moriarty. The whole screwing with people to get their reactions definitely stands out as a common ENTJ trait, and Izaya seems to have a level of Se closer to that exhibited by Moriarty. The explosive anger thing doesn't strike me as very ENTJ, since all the ENTJs I know have *much* better control of their Te, but since Moriarty is something of a psychopath that might account for his irrational anger.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top