Personality Cafe banner

421 - 440 of 445 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,146 Posts
Finished Jack Reacher 3 finally. That was a bit of a slog. Wasn't as good as 2. Felt needlessly padded out for page count more than anything. So far our hero Jack Reacher is 3 for 3 in fucking the female co-star. Wonder if this pattern will continue throughout the other 27 novels.


Halfway through Handmaid's Tale. I've already finished it once before but wanted to give it another go before the sequel came out. Basically only got the sequel out of curiosity. To see where it goes and if it makes sense.


About one quarter of the way through On The Road. Also read this before. Well, I "read" it. Listened to the audiobook and have to say I'm enjoying reading it more. Picked it up again a few weeks ago when I was sad and wanted to have something "inspirational" and somewhat hopeful to pick me up. It worked a bit. Can't tell you if it was because of the book or because so much time has passed since then that I healed naturally.


Still have a lot in my "to read and actually own" list. About 3 years ago ordered a good few sci-fi books because I was on a sci-fi buzz only to lose interest when they actually arrived. They're still there. Have one or two horrors I could dive into, it being almost October and all. Had a sudden urge to read the Hunger Games trilogy a few weeks ago so that boxset is sitting close by too. Jack Reacher 4 is in the "currently reading" pile but don't know if I can do another one right after 3. I feel obligated to read them all since I've started the series now but maybe I should slow it down so it feels like a series and not a sentence I've subjected myself to as a punishment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,790 Posts
currently reading "How to Read a Book"

I read a lot of books, but I want to start understanding and retaining more of what I read. So I picked this book up because it is supposed to give incredibly wise, practical instruction on the proper way to read books :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,137 Posts
i've got the house of mirth by edith wharton, but i can already tell i'm going to get nowhere with it. 1905 is just too long ago for me. i'm never good with anything from before wwii, and the handful of things i do get along with [moby dick the one exception] are emphatically non-american. i don't think americans realise how american their early literature is. nothing wrong with that in itself; i just can't.

so i'm not sure what i thought i was doing with this one. i think i mistook her for nancy mitford.
 

·
Plague Doctor
Joined
·
5,927 Posts
i don't think americans realise how american their early literature is. nothing wrong with that in itself; i just can't.
I've been thinking about this a lot lately as there are so many books I love that I really want to share with my Australian friends who read, but I realise that there are way too many American references and perspectives from the American side that it would just be off-putting or maybe even distracting from the story itself.

Since this is the books thread, I wanted to say that Oscar Wilde absolutely counts as a fairy tale writer. If you have time to check it out, The Nightingale and the Rose is the one that really "got" me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,137 Posts
way too many American references and perspectives from the American side that it would just be off-putting or maybe even distracting from the story itself.
it's funny how it only gets to me in the early stuff. from about midcentury on i don't care at all. i actually read quite a lot of american fiction in second grade - that was the year i FINALLY made a friend who read a book a day too, and acted like it was completely normal instead of making a circus monkey of me for it. she just happened to be part of an american army family of some kind. i went through the whole american-kid-novel canon that year thanks to her.

so there's more of it i can tolerate than i tend to remember, but my hates are towering by comparison. louisa may alcott and l. frank baum. those are the two i find indigestible almost to the point of revulsion. not to say i didn't read them; i went through books like a termite. but i guess the thing is, of all the books those are so staggeringly american. and when things are that american it's like they're over the event horizon of my common ground. it's a foreign and more-than-just-faintly creepy mindset to me.

Oscar Wilde absolutely counts as a fairy tale writer.
yay \o/ i went looking for the nightingale and it came back to me even while the results were on their way back from google. very wilde. i liked his short stories a lot as a kid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,137 Posts
reading 'johannes cabal the necromancer' by jonathan l. howard. really enjoying it. i've read pratchett without ever getting as excited by him as most people seem to, but i'm liking this book a lot and seeing . . . just a sort of higher grade of pratchettism.

spoiler to avoid offending the pratchett people

 


i did read a lot of pratchett, 20-whatever years ago. i class his books in my everest pile: books that you read because they're there more than actively for their own sake. enjoyable but hardly thought-provoking. and i could see he was clever and funny, but it seemed like a fairly run-of-the-mill kind of clever-and-funny-ness, to me. like sitcoms. lots of jokes that you see coming a mile away, and when they arrive you just check the 'mandatory' box in the list to record that he failed to fail to make them. not truly original. and i dislike that pseudo-jocose schick of the feisty-and-'unexpectedly'-hip old lady quite a lot. so, yeah.




anyway; this is more macabre, darker, has more of a real story to it and the goofiness seems less mailed-in to me. it's a faust-style story and i'm into the last third (and final two souls) with still not the faintest idea what kind of twist is coming or how it is going to resolve.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,137 Posts
got two books going at once: bill bryson's history of nearly everything and crazy rich asians.

it's a pretty weird mix. cosmology and consumerism; oddly enough both seem to encompass a lot of numbers followed by many zeros. :tongue:. the brand-spotting in dra got very boring very fast so the characters are actually starting to stand out from their background a bit. the bryson . . . well, i never was interested in cosmic physics, so i'm still waiting for us to get to the interesting part. aka the individual people and stories in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,279 Posts
After finishing The Vision Of the Anointed, I now have two books next to my bed:
- The Pilot's Textbook
 

- Knowledge And Decisions by Thomas Sowell
Should expand on Hayek's The Use of Knowledge in Society

On my desk (for reminders) I have Meditations by Marcus Aurelius Antonius and Lessons Learned In Software Testing by Kaner, Bach and Pettichord.
 

·
Plague Doctor
Joined
·
5,927 Posts
Since last updating:

Structural Forms of the Feminine Psyche by Toni Wolff - An essay rather than a book introducing the 4 feminine archetypes by Jung's mistress (for over 40 years) & student.

Lectures on Jung's Aion by Barbara Hannah - I would suggest this as "Aion Lite" rather than anything new and profound regarding Aion. However, there is a large section at the back of the book with interviews with Marie Louise Von Franz that might be worth the purchase of the book.

In addition to these, I'm still reading fairytale retellings. I've discovered Melanie Cellier and I was uncertain about how seriously I could take her until I started recognising how she stayed true to the symbols of the tales she was telling while also spinning some very unique takes on each retelling I have read so far. 4 books of her books under my belt since the last time I posted but only because they can easily be read in one sitting.

Catching up on my read 50 books/year goal as I'm still behind but not by nearly as much as I was last time I posted. : )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,898 Posts
Rosinante to the Road Again by John Dos Passos. Stories about his time in Spain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,137 Posts
somewhere around here is a book i brought home a few months ago and promptly lost, because at the time i wasn't in the right mood for fluff. it would be perfect right now, but i still can't find it.

finished the bryson and for this and the reason above, not reading anything currently. i'd like to be, i just can't settle on something i feel like reading.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,320 Posts
probably one of the best books I have read to date - musashi miyamoto by eiiji yoshikawa
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,137 Posts
a very good biography of mordecai richler, by charles foran.

i love richler. he was required reading when i was in 10th grade, and the apprenticeship of duddy kravitz was the first thing i ever wrote a serious, full-hearted paper about. about the only thing, too; until i was most of the way through university and got a sudden inspiration about 'the uses of space in madame bovary' :tongue:. i just didn't understand what a lit essay was meant to be for, most of the rest of the time.

but richler; yeah. right out of high school i volunteered for katimavik, and spent three months of a winter in montreal - without knowing it, one of my assignments was right there in outremont. so he's always been very live and real to me, and of course if you read all his books very little in any biography seems like it would be any kind of surprise.

i'm still enjoying the hell out of it. and i still think duddy kravitz is one of the quietly great, tragic books of all time.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
17,147 Posts
THE TEACHING ABOUT EMOTIONS: Historical-Psychological Studies - Lev Vygotsky

Sad that it ends with a lot left to go due to an abrupt illness and death of the author.
I really wanted to see more detailed analysis of Spinoza but a very ongoing critique of Cartesian dualism running through science of psychology was still very interesting if a bot repetitive (author likely didn’t get to efit much).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,137 Posts
i passed one of those 'free books! do us a favour and take these away' curbside tables yesterday while i was out for a walk. i'm reading one of them now - god's pocket by a guy called pete dexter.

i'm loving it. this guy has me caring hard right away about all these people who know perfectly well who dunnit, and hoping hard that it works out without any of them getting caught. i also haven't a clue, on page 201 out of 274 - how that can be made to happen. there's no ambiguity here about sympathies, but there are so many wild cards you don't even know where to start.

and it's managing to be both funny and genuinely heart-catching at the same time. "mickey figured the only thing that could turn that kid around would be if he got a chance to run over you twice."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,159 Posts
Discussion Starter #440
Just finished "Napoleon: A Life" (excellent - very well-researched)

Just started:
Bedtime audiobook: the Great Courses: Food - A Cultural Culinary History
Actual book: Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
 
421 - 440 of 445 Posts
Top