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As a heavy desktop user, I am not looking for a laptop with top notch processing abilities but just something affordable (under CAD $1000), light weight, power efficient, and allows for Microsoft Office applications.

I have been searching (admittedly not with much effort) for decent laptops for a good six months so I am dead set on getting one. I really need to get work done at school during gaps between classes! Ultrabooks may be more my realm but who knows.

Thus I would like to ask all you tech savvy individuals on your thoughts and reviews.
Hell, you can even pretend to be a sales person giving me a sales pitch :joyous:
 

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If you don't plan on doing any gaming, then there are plenty of options for under $1000, even in ultra-book form. Whatever you go for, make sure it's got an SSD instead of a mechanical hard drive (capacity is irrelevant if you don't have lots of music, photos, videos or other large files). It really depends on your use case what the best option is for you, but with such broad criteria, just go for the cheapest and thinnest you can find! Also it's worth checking out reviews from various sources before buying to understand what the strengths and weaknesses are.
 

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If you don't plan on doing any gaming, then there are plenty of options for under $1000, even in ultra-book form. Whatever you go for, make sure it's got an SSD instead of a mechanical hard drive (capacity is irrelevant if you don't have lots of music, photos, videos or other large files). It really depends on your use case what the best option is for you, but with such broad criteria, just go for the cheapest and thinnest you can find! Also it's worth checking out reviews from various sources before buying to understand what the strengths and weaknesses are.
SSDs are pretty overrated imo, especially when speed isnt a real concern. If you arent regularly opening and working with resource heavy programs then an SSD is more of a bonus than a necessity. I wouldnt go out of my way to ge one.
 

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SSDs are pretty overrated imo, especially when speed isnt a real concern. If you arent regularly opening and working with resource heavy programs then an SSD is more of a bonus than a necessity. I wouldnt go out of my way to ge one.
SSDs are a necessity, especially if storage capcity isn't a concern. I/O is by far the biggest bottleneck for performance nowadays than memory or CPU-bound tasks. Even if you're working with small files, the overall experience of using the operating system feels unbearable with a mechanical hard drive. There's simply no excuse for laptops to ship without SSDs. And over time, a HDD-only system becomes even slower in my experience.
 

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SSDs are a necessity, especially if storage capcity isn't a concern. I/O is by far the biggest bottleneck for performance nowadays than memory or CPU-bound tasks. Even if you're working with small files, the overall experience of using the operating system feels unbearable with a mechanical hard drive.
Thats your personal opinion. From my personal experience, the I/O is only a bottleneck when you start the computer or start a program.

A Y50-70 (an average "gaming" laptop from a few years back, you can probably find a used one with similar specs quite cheaply) with a plain 1TB hard drive takes about 30 s to a minute to become useable from being turned off completely. From standby it takes about as long as it takes you to type in the password, maybe 10-15 s. The biggest time sinks for starting that I have are Matlab (about 1-2 minutes, maybe more), Solidworks (about 30 s) and Doom 2016 (about 2 minutes, maybe more, it is a 60+ GB game though). Word and such take about 10 seconds, Chrome takes about 20. And after all that excruciating, unbeareable waiting, loading a file in these programs takes no time at all, a prerequisite of that is probably having enough memory (Ive got 8GB).

You see, the loading times are only a problem if your opening and closing a lot of things, all the time.

There's simply no excuse for laptops to ship without SSDs.
Yes, there is, its the price. Why does low octane gas exist? Why is it everywhere? Because not all cars need the higher octane stuff.

And over time, a HDD-only system becomes even slower in my experience.
And objectively an SSD will eventually "wear out", what is your point? If you keep unnecessary startup programs and useless programs in general to a minimum and dont waste space on pointless things then youll be fine.

And keep in mind that only things that are on the SSD will get the benefit or ridiculous loading speeds. If the thing is on a secondary mechanical drive or an external drive then it wont be as fast.
 

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As a heavy desktop user, I am not looking for a laptop with top notch processing abilities but just something affordable (under CAD $1000), light weight, power efficient, and allows for Microsoft Office applications.

I have been searching (admittedly not with much effort) for decent laptops for a good six months so I am dead set on getting one. I really need to get work done at school during gaps between classes! Ultrabooks may be more my realm but who knows.

Thus I would like to ask all you tech savvy individuals on your thoughts and reviews.
Hell, you can even pretend to be a sales person giving me a sales pitch :joyous:
mac book air
you can get a refurbished one in your price range
they were designed for scholastics/ business use
 

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Thats your personal opinion. From my personal experience, the I/O is only a bottleneck when you start the computer or start a program.

A Y50-70 (an average "gaming" laptop from a few years back, you can probably find a used one with similar specs quite cheaply) with a plain 1TB hard drive takes about 30 s to a minute to become useable from being turned off completely. From standby it takes about as long as it takes you to type in the password, maybe 10-15 s. The biggest time sinks for starting that I have are Matlab (about 1-2 minutes, maybe more), Solidworks (about 30 s) and Doom 2016 (about 2 minutes, maybe more, it is a 60+ GB game though). Word and such take about 10 seconds, Chrome takes about 20. And after all that excruciating, unbeareable waiting, loading a file in these programs takes no time at all, a prerequisite of that is probably having enough memory (Ive got 8GB).

You see, the loading times are only a problem if your opening and closing a lot of things, all the time.



Yes, there is, its the price. Why does low octane gas exist? Why is it everywhere? Because not all cars need the higher octane stuff.



And objectively an SSD will eventually "wear out", what is your point? If you keep unnecessary startup programs and useless programs in general to a minimum and dont waste space on pointless things then youll be fine.

And keep in mind that only things that are on the SSD will get the benefit or ridiculous loading speeds. If the thing is on a secondary mechanical drive or an external drive then it wont be as fast.
SSDs don't "wear out". They simply fail after some hundreds of TB writes, and performance degradation is negligible. And come on, when you use a computer, you're always opening and closing stuff, turning it on and off (especially if it's a laptop). All these seconds of waiting add up. And SSDs aren't anywhere near as expensive as people make them out to be. The cost of shipping a mass-produced laptop with a 128GB SSD isn't far different from shipping with a 1TB 5400 RPM HDD.

Simply put, a HDD-only system is a pain to use in my experience.
 

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SSDs don't "wear out". They simply fail after some hundreds of TB writes, and performance degradation is negligible.
What is the difference between wearing out and failing after a time? Arent those the same thing? :rolleyes:

And come on, when you use a computer, you're always opening and closing stuff,
Yeah, no Im not. When I use something then its for a longer period of time, I dont dart around from one program to the next. I plan ahead, when I know Im going to change files then I keep the program open for example so it doesnt need to load everythign again.

turning it on and off (especially if it's a laptop).
I think what you mean by that is closing the lid, by default that doesnt shut it down, it puts it on standby. Starting from standby doesnt compare to starting from being shut down. Your point only makes sense if youre slapping it shut every 2 minutes

All these seconds of waiting add up.
How terrible it must be :unsure:

And SSDs aren't anywhere near as expensive as people make them out to be. The cost of shipping a mass-produced laptop with a 128GB SSD isn't far different from shipping with a 1TB 5400 RPM HDD.
5400 is pretty slow, dont you think? I thought we were at that point where things are moving towards at least 7200 rpm. And 128 GB is probably enough just for Windows, all your programs and little else. And then youll need an external hard drive if you have a lot of media files for example.

You keep talking about your experience and your arguments arent that good. I think the casual user can put up with a bit of waiting here and there, god knows what those "I only check my email and look at a document every now and again" computers end up being like, completely mistreated and full of junk.
 

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@Skeletalz In the interest of time and patience, I think we can conclude that you don't see the value of an SSD and overestimate their costs. In terms of reliability, hundreds of terrabytes of writes are more than enough. I've had a Samsung 840 EVO for almost 5 years and I'm only at around 4 TB writes.

I wouldn't strongly advise against buying a computer which doesn't have an SSD. I stand by that.
 

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Why wouldn't you want a budget laptop? When it comes to battery life more info is needed. But some budget laptops claim over 5 hours of battery life according to whatever tests they use. That's under $300. Smaller screens = greater battery life.

There was there other guy asking about laptops and said "maybe I'd be doing some light CAD stuff" and presented his first option as being an almost $1,700 laptop that had lower performance than the one I got at $900 and it probably couldn't do graphics very well.

There are lot of fluff features that are thrown in like IPS displays. That's a very nice thing, but on the other hand they consume more power and aren't needed if you aren't using color sensitive applications and even worse 4K laptops, why? Why!? That's a massive waste of money.

Mine is 1920x1080 but it could have just as easily have been 1336x768 and would have costed a lot less. You should consider these things and factor your price wisely. Don't just spend your budget because you have it.

There are budget laptops with very low capacity SSDs, but with Windows 10 boot times are cut in half because of hybrid shutdown. You won't be waiting a minute after logging in. Do you want a faster experience or more storage? That factors in. The other fact about HDDs is you need to know how to maintain your computer. Defragment the hard drive if you are using a hard disk drive. If you are using a solid state drive, do not defragment it. I don't think you are actually able to anyway, but that would be a very bad idea.

But as I have said, Microsoft Word, PowerPoint and all of these things, you don't need to pay over $300.
 

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@Skeletalz In the interest of time and patience, I think we can conclude that you don't see the value of an SSD
What we? Is there a board of directors I havent been made aware of? lmao

I dont see the value because the pros arent important to me.

and overestimate their costs.
Quit making shit up, a few bucks here and there doesnt matter when the computer costs hundreds. What the final choice should come down to is other hardware.

In terms of reliability, hundreds of terrabytes of writes are more than enough. I've had a Samsung 840 EVO for almost 5 years and I'm only at around 4 TB writes.
Im afraid "hundreds of terabytes of writes" wont say much to the average computer user. Tbh thats a completely arbitrary parameter if the computer isnt rigorously used because it simply wont be reached. If the computer isnt used to roughly its full capabilities then cutting edge performance isnt necessary either, see where Im going with this?

I wouldn't strongly advise against buying a computer which doesn't have an SSD.
Neither did I.
 

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For a little less than $1000, if you're not going for an ultrabook, I'd expect something with 8GB of DDR3 RAM (preferably dual channel but that's not a big deal), a ULV Core i7 from the Kaby Lake (7th) generation, a 1-2TB hard drive and a low end dedicated graphics chip that'll likely suffice for 4k video playback/editing and light gaming. The main issues with this sort of laptop would be the ~6 hour battery life, thicc design, the low quality, cheap 768p screen, and the slow, loud hard drive.

To get around those, I'd recommend an ultrabook. For a similar price I think you can expect 128-256 GB of SSD storage, a ULV core i5 from the Broadwell (5th) generation at the oldest, 8GB of RAM, much longer battery life (~9-10 hours seems to be the average) and a 1080P IPS display with better viewing angles and colours. The trade offs are the lower storage, slower performance, and lack of a dedicated graphics chip. This isn't a big deal if you're not playing demanding games or editing HD video. It will be more than fast enough for day to day tasks, studying, writing stuff, watching 4K video, etc.
 
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