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I am in a very bold, inquisitive mood tonight.

Any black INFPs out there?

It is a touchy thing to start a thread based on race, but I think that the more we talk about uncomfortable racial issues, the more we break down the walls that separate us.

Anyway, this is especially difficult for me because I have issues with the question I am going to ask.

Here it is:

I have noticed that black culture holds a higher standard of masculinity for males than the white middle-class culture I grew up in. Furthermore, it has been implied that black culture has a very intolerant attitude toward homosexuality, so males who do not conform to the extreme standards of masculinity are discriminated against disproportionately in comparison to the white community.

Now the first problem I have with this question is that I do not really believe in "black culture." Black is a color. Skin color does not predetermine who you become.

I actually have issues with what I would call "gangsta" or "ghetto" culture which is not even racially specific these days. It is a culture born from poverty with lack of social support, when people are born into horrible conditions and survive by any means possible. A lot of times this means selling crack or joining a gang. It is a culture that has been glorified by mainstream rappers whose content is determined by corporations typically owned by white billionaires. This is a culture of desperation, a result of decades of slavery followed by over a century of blatant discrimination.

I apologize if I have gone into a rant, but I am offended by companies that suggest this is what it means to have dark skin. BET is a disgrace to blacks. This channel tells the world, and even more detrimentally it tells black society that being black means being violent, drug peddling, gang-connected, shallow, ignorant, womanizing etc. These are the same things a modern white supremacist would use as an example of white superiority, but it isnt a fucking racial thing! Which is why I am constantly disappointed that there is not a larger minority of blacks speaking out against the 'ghetto' stereotype. Instead, it seems most try as hard as possible to be a shining example of the black stereotype. And lower-class whites try to adhere to this stereotype because it has become trendy. It is embarrassing to humanity, quite frankly, but it is "racist" to say so because having black skin and being a part of gang culture has become synonymous to most people.

I am one of those INFPs who has learned to enjoy criticism, so let me know where I am being ignorant! That is how we grow!

And I do realize that my ancestors were likely the cause of the struggles of black americans, but these days that means nothing. I didn't know the bastards. I'm only responsible for my own actions, and you are all responsible for yours.
 

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I have noticed that black culture holds a higher standard of masculinity for males than the white middle-class culture I grew up in. Furthermore, it has been implied that black culture has a very intolerant attitude toward homosexuality, so males who do not conform to the extreme standards of masculinity are discriminated against disproportionately in comparison to the white community.
I disagree. I think the hip-hop culture holds a different standard of masculinity than the middle-class culture and I think many people of different races buy into that as being more masculine. I guess if one considers unwarranted aggression, self-centerdness, an apathetic attitude towards everything, an obsession with flaunting money, and an endeavor to sleep with as many women as possible, as masculine then maybe that might be true. I think a man who takes care of his family and doesn't cheat on his wife is more masculine than some thug who slings dope for a living and can't keep his pants up.

Unfortunately, many women seem to be attracted to this type of man which is disturbing to say the least. I, honestly, find it hard to have any sympathy for women who find themselves in abusive relationships with these individuals.
 

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Black INFP!

I am in a very bold, inquisitive mood tonight.

Any black INFPs out there?

It is a touchy thing to start a thread based on race, but I think that the more we talk about uncomfortable racial issues, the more we break down the walls that separate us.

Anyway, this is especially difficult for me because I have issues with the question I am going to ask.

Here it is:

I have noticed that black culture holds a higher standard of masculinity for males than the white middle-class culture I grew up in. Furthermore, it has been implied that black culture has a very intolerant attitude toward homosexuality, so males who do not conform to the extreme standards of masculinity are discriminated against disproportionately in comparison to the white community.

Now the first problem I have with this question is that I do not really believe in "black culture." Black is a color. Skin color does not predetermine who you become.

I actually have issues with what I would call "gangsta" or "ghetto" culture which is not even racially specific these days. It is a culture born from poverty with lack of social support, when people are born into horrible conditions and survive by any means possible. A lot of times this means selling crack or joining a gang. It is a culture that has been glorified by mainstream rappers whose content is determined by corporations typically owned by white billionaires. This is a culture of desperation, a result of decades of slavery followed by over a century of blatant discrimination.

I apologize if I have gone into a rant, but I am offended by companies that suggest this is what it means to have dark skin. BET is a disgrace to blacks. This channel tells the world, and even more detrimentally it tells black society that being black means being violent, drug peddling, gang-connected, shallow, ignorant, womanizing etc. These are the same things a modern white supremacist would use as an example of white superiority, but it isnt a fucking racial thing! Which is why I am constantly disappointed that there is not a larger minority of blacks speaking out against the 'ghetto' stereotype. Instead, it seems most try as hard as possible to be a shining example of the black stereotype. And lower-class whites try to adhere to this stereotype because it has become trendy. It is embarrassing to humanity, quite frankly, but it is "racist" to say so because having black skin and being a part of gang culture has become synonymous to most people.

I am one of those INFPs who has learned to enjoy criticism, so let me know where I am being ignorant! That is how we grow!

And I do realize that my ancestors were likely the cause of the struggles of black americans, but these days that means nothing. I didn't know the bastards. I'm only responsible for my own actions, and you are all responsible for yours.
lol I totally know what you mean and agree. The thing is, in the black community, as much as we talk about equality and social acceptance, a lot of us are worse racists than white supremacists; you wouldn't believe some of the things I've heard in all black company. Also, we can be incredibly intolerant of differences among ourselves - a black person who gets grades too high or acts too intelligent is deemed something of a traitor, and maybe be ostracized or even actively attacked. Sometimes black people (especially males) may act stupid or purposefully get bad grades and do poorly in general to because the pressure to conform is so great. this also goes for black people who have friends of another race that they hang out with often; again, it's like you're committing treason or something. Luckily, I grew up in a diverse pocket city in southern California, and most of the people there had been there since birth and everyone knew each other pretty well. I've never met another black INFP, though I expect there are a lot of us out there who cannot show ourselves for fear of social rejection.
 

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I disagree. I think the hip-hop culture holds a different standard of masculinity than the middle-class culture and I think many people of different races buy into that as being more masculine. I guess if one considers unwarranted aggression, self-centerdness, an apathetic attitude towards everything, an obsession with flaunting money, and an endeavor to sleep with as many women as possible, as masculine then maybe that might be true. I think a man who takes care of his family and doesn't cheat on his wife is more masculine than some thug who slings dope for a living and can't keep his pants up.

Unfortunately, many women seem to be attracted to this type of man which is disturbing to say the least. I, honestly, find it hard to have any sympathy for women who find themselves in abusive relationships with these individuals.
Actually, it's not just the hip-hop culture. I think this same attitude manifests itself differently in all genres of music and economic status, but it seems to be more common in hip-hop and the lower class. Then there are middle/upper-class men who imitate this attitude because it seems to attract a lot of women, in my opinion.
 

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I am in a very bold, inquisitive mood tonight.

Any black INFPs out there?

It is a touchy thing to start a thread based on race, but I think that the more we talk about uncomfortable racial issues, the more we break down the walls that separate us.

Anyway, this is especially difficult for me because I have issues with the question I am going to ask.

Here it is:

I have noticed that black culture holds a higher standard of masculinity for males than the white middle-class culture I grew up in. Furthermore, it has been implied that black culture has a very intolerant attitude toward homosexuality, so males who do not conform to the extreme standards of masculinity are discriminated against disproportionately in comparison to the white community.

Now the first problem I have with this question is that I do not really believe in "black culture." Black is a color. Skin color does not predetermine who you become.

I actually have issues with what I would call "gangsta" or "ghetto" culture which is not even racially specific these days. It is a culture born from poverty with lack of social support, when people are born into horrible conditions and survive by any means possible. A lot of times this means selling crack or joining a gang. It is a culture that has been glorified by mainstream rappers whose content is determined by corporations typically owned by white billionaires. This is a culture of desperation, a result of decades of slavery followed by over a century of blatant discrimination.

I apologize if I have gone into a rant, but I am offended by companies that suggest this is what it means to have dark skin. BET is a disgrace to blacks. This channel tells the world, and even more detrimentally it tells black society that being black means being violent, drug peddling, gang-connected, shallow, ignorant, womanizing etc. These are the same things a modern white supremacist would use as an example of white superiority, but it isnt a fucking racial thing! Which is why I am constantly disappointed that there is not a larger minority of blacks speaking out against the 'ghetto' stereotype. Instead, it seems most try as hard as possible to be a shining example of the black stereotype. And lower-class whites try to adhere to this stereotype because it has become trendy. It is embarrassing to humanity, quite frankly, but it is "racist" to say so because having black skin and being a part of gang culture has become synonymous to most people.

I am one of those INFPs who has learned to enjoy criticism, so let me know where I am being ignorant! That is how we grow!

And I do realize that my ancestors were likely the cause of the struggles of black americans, but these days that means nothing. I didn't know the bastards. I'm only responsible for my own actions, and you are all responsible for yours.
Black INFP here, i so wanted to make this post, but I doubted I'd even get a response. .

I've been mulling over alot of the points you brought up my entire life.

Black america is madddddd homophobic. Now, I'm not gay in the least bit, I'm fully confident in and aware of my heterosexual nature and individual identity. The problem is INFP traits in black men are perceived to be 'gay' or bitch like.

The male 'INFP type' isn't accepted or embraced at all in black society (least not in my experience), rather its extremely discriminated against. Its viewed as feminine, dudes will call you out-call you a bitch, a ****** and straight up challenge you. Its the kind of culture that confronts you (moreso men than women) for not falling into the appropriate gender role or type.

As a result, I've spent most of my life pretending to be other 'types' (ENTJ/INTP) which are more socially acceptable and allow me to survive.

I grew up in the blackest county (at the time, still heavily black though) in the U.S., so you can only imagine the sense of isolation and misunderstanding I felt when it seemed there where not only no other men 'like me' but that people 'like me' weren't tolerated to begin with. I dealt by avoiding the inevitable confrontations, I was basically never 'INFP' around most of my black friends/family/people. Some were accepting, most weren't.

The kicker is, I faced (in comparison to black society) very little 'discrimination' from my white/other race friends/people; the masks I wore around my own people weren't really needed when I wasn't around them. Or rather, i only faced the stigma of an INFP in an ESTJ's world, instead of the layered stigma i've always faced within black culture: being a hetero black male infp.

I imagine the number of black male INFPs is pretty low, damn near non existent.

Take this with a grain of salt, not every black male discriminates against INFP-ism-I've just experienced it as a prevailing trend my entire life. There are open minded black people out there, accepting people who defy this trend but they sure as hell aren't the majority.

Black men/society is essentially, characteristically ESTJ. Not that all black people are ESTJ, its just the standard propagated and espoused culturally. It also happens to be the INFP shadow type of which theres something worth noting-its probably the most extreme case of 'opposites' within MBTI type theory.

Black culture does exist by the way, I dont see how its related to predestiny at all. .

Also, fuck BET.
 

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Is there actually a black culture? To my knowledge there isn't a white culture. I think many of these characteristics that are being attributed to black men are also applicable to black women, as well as white men and white women who grew up in the same environment.

Gender itself is not definitive.

gen·der: the behavioral, cultural, or psychological traits typically associated with one sex.

Different societies have different roles/attributes that define gender. So to say that one culture is more masculine/feminine than another culture isn't really accurate. It is accurate, however, to say that one culture is more violent, selfish, inconsiderate of others, than another culture. Unfortunately, these traits are often misinterpreted as masculine. No particular race embodies that attitude even if one is more prevalent.
 

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Is there actually a black culture? To my knowledge there isn't a white culture. I think many of these characteristics that are being attributed to black men are also applicable to black women, as well as white men and white women who grew up in the same environment.

Gender itself is not definitive.

gen·der: the behavioral, cultural, or psychological traits typically associated with one sex.

Different societies have different roles/attributes that define gender. So to say that one culture is more masculine/feminine than another culture isn't really accurate. It is accurate, however, to say that one culture is more violent, selfish, inconsiderate of others, than another culture. No particular race embodies that attitude even if one is more prevalent.
The concept is fluid, it doesn't apply to everyone equally. Not every black person accepts it, some completely reject and don't even acknowledge it, but let me tell you as a black kid from the DMV area; it does exist. Our concepts of gender are partially baked into it, along with a ton of other things I'm too lazy to go into..

Its existence doesn't mean inevitable acceptance and adherance by every black person, but large portions (arguably the majority) embrace it; both conscious and unconsciously.

I will say this (me and my room mate were talking about it earlier) there doesn't seem to be a white culture comparable to what I'm referring to. White people have often seemed (to myself and the other minorities I bring this up with) culture-less, whatever that means..

Different societies have different roles/attributes that define gender. So to say that one culture is more masculine/feminine than another culture isn't really accurate. It is accurate, however, to say that one culture is more violent, selfish, inconsiderate of others, than another culture. No particular race embodies that attitude even if one is more prevalent

Gender roles differ in the ways in which they are interpreted by different societies; but the roles are pretty universal in my opinion. Societies interpret them differently and generate their own norms from them, culture often plays a role in this.

Also, are you referring to black culture as "more violent, selfish, inconsiderate of others, than another culture"; or do you still wonder if 'black culture' exists?
 

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I agree that gangsta culture is part of the problem preventing equality rather than being the source of solidarity, rebellion, freedom and pride that its proponents claim. It is something that makes it even more socially acceptable to hate women, and to disrespect anything feminine, as long as you aren't hating black males. Ideally, nobody would be hated because of gender or race. If I have something against a black person who is saying misogynistic things, glorifying violence and materialism, and acting like being arrogant makes him more desirable, it is the exact same thing that I would have against a white person who behaved this way. I read a survey in a newspaper showing that more young, white males listen to gangsta rap music than black people and women combined. The idea that it is the symbol of "black culture" is not only offensive and demeaning to black people, but also based on factual inaccuracies, assuming that what I read was true.

According to an article entitled "From Sweatshop to Hip Hop" from
Arc.org, Marian Salzman, the founding director of Chiat/Day, said the
following about the demographics of rap music listeners:

"A typical gangsta rap listener is a 14-year-old white boy from the
suburbs. An in-your-face attitude is a marketing hook that screams
authentic." - Marian Salzman

For a different perspective,I find this article interesting. Its author, a black female, sees gangsta rap as a symptom of a larger cultural problem. I'm not quite convinced that misogyny is the source of the evil, and would say that the polarization of gender expectations is actually the central issue, which just happens to include misogyny as one of its tentacles. I tend to fight just as hard for men's rights as for women's rights. People of both genders should be entitled to behave authentically, within ethical boundaries, without having to be shamed for being "pussies" or for being "mannish." Anyhow, here it is:

Race & Ethnicity: hooks: Misogyny, Gangsta...
The sexist, misogynist, patriarchal ways of thinking and behaving that are glorified in gangsta rap are a reflection of the prevailing values in our society, values created and sustained by white supremacist capitalist patriarchy. As the crudest and most brutal expression of sexism, misogynistic attitudes tend to be portrayed by the dominant culture as an expression of male deviance. In reality they are part of a sexist continuum, necessary for the maintenance of patriarchal social order. While patriarchy and sexism continue to be the political and cultural norm in our society, feminist movement has created a climate where crude expressions of male domination are called into question, especially if they are made by men in power. It is useful to think of misogyny as a field that must be labored in and maintained both to sustain patriarchy but also to serve as an ideological anti-feminist backlash. And what better group to labor on this "plantation" than young black men.

Something I read earlier today related to this topic, and I thought it was relevant, even though it was about a white rapper:
8 Reasons Eminem's Popularity is a Disaster for Women (Sorry, Selene. I stole this from your blog, even though you took the other side of the debate. I agree with this wholeheartedly, whether you do or not.)
 

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Our concepts of gender are partially baked into it, along with a ton of other things I'm too lazy to go into..
Does your concept of gender come from the environment you grew up in or the color of your skin? Do the white/hispanic people who grew up around you have the same perspective of masculinity?
 

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Its author, a black female, sees gangsta rap as a symptom of a larger cultural problem. I'm not quite convinced that misogyny is the source of the evil, and would say that the polarization of gender expectations is actually the central issue, which just happens to include misogyny as one of its tentacles. I tend to fight just as hard for men's rights as for women's rights. People of both genders should be entitled to behave authentically, within ethical boundaries, without having to be shamed for being "pussies" or for being "mannish." Anyhow, here it is:
The problem is that women propagate this mentality by choosing these domineering, misogynistic men over those who aren't. Much of what men do is for the purpose of acquiring "pussy." If women love guys who flaunt money and demonstrate aggression, guess what men are going to do? If women fell head over heals for guys who are sensitive to their emotional needs, the majority of men would alter their behavior to accommodate that or at least imitate it in pursuit of casual sex. It's a cycle. As long as women seek aggressive, dominant assholes, there will be plenty of them to choose from.
 

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Actually, it's not just the hip-hop culture. I think this same attitude manifests itself differently in all genres of music and economic status, but it seems to be more common in hip-hop and the lower class. Then there are middle/upper-class men who imitate this attitude because it seems to attract a lot of women, in my opinion.
That is an interesting point, aside from your usual snip at women for preferring assholes, which I have come to expect as a predictable expression of your loneliness.

I guess where I live, the equivalent of gangsta rap is this really bad country music that plays everywhere I go. It is the anthem of the impoverished white macho cowboys, and a lot of it is about drinking and cheating. The hicks tend to have a very homophobic, chauvinistic attitude, and they get into bar fights where they beat each other to a pulp. They also get a rush from killing animals to prove their dominance. They use the same words for their prey as they use for women, "scoring" by "bagging" the one with the biggest "rack" so they can keep it as a "trophy." It is considered a sport, even though their opponents have no say in whether they participate in the game. In this way, hunting is analogous with rape. Their guns are symbols for their penises, ejaculating death with a ferocious bang.

edit: I find it offensive when you generalize about women, acting as though we were responsible for male violence against us and deserve all that is done to us as a punishment for allowing it. Men, as individuals, are responsible for their own actions, and cannot use "I did it to get laid" as an excuse. When I was with an abuser, it wasn't because I liked being abused, or because I sought it out. It was because he did not reveal himself as such until after he had gained my trust. As you know, I have a natural preference for harmless men. They are just very difficult to find.
 

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That is an interesting point, aside from your usual snip at women for preferring assholes, which I have come to expect as a predictable expression of your loneliness.
If by loneliness, you mean I'm not in a relationship then I would have to agree with you. But I too have learned to evolve. I'm not even looking for a relationship right now. For the time being, I'm perfectly content fucking women without any strings attached.

I guess where I live, the equivalent of gangsta rap is this really bad country music that plays everywhere I go. It is the anthem of the impoverished white macho cowboys, and a lot of it is about drinking and cheating. The hicks tend to have a very homophobic, chauvinistic attitude, and they get into bar fights where they beat each other to a pulp. They also get a rush from killing animals to prove their dominance. They use the same words for their prey as they use for women, "scoring" by "bagging" the one with the biggest "rack" so they can keep it as a "trophy." It is considered a sport, even though their opponents have no say in whether they participate in the game. In this way, hunting is analogous with rape. Their guns are symbols for their penises, ejaculating death with a ferocious bang.

Maybe it is more prevalent than I thought.
I have a feeling this was in reference to my avatar. I don't even listen to country music.
 

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Cafe Legend and MOTM Jan 2011
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If by loneliness, you mean I'm not in a relationship then I would have to agree with you. But I too have learned to evolve. I'm not even looking for a relationship right now. For the time being, I'm perfectly content fucking women without any strings attached.



I have a feeling this was in reference to my avatar. I don't even listen to country music.
To be perfectly honest, I hadn't noticed your avatar until you mentioned it just now. No, I don't see you as a hick. I see you as a soldier. I don't hate you for it. I just feel sad about it.
I can see how what I said could be interpreted as an attack, but I didn't intend it that way. I was actually agreeing with you about how the problem transcends race and class, and how everyone is affected.
 
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I agree that gangsta culture is part of the problem preventing equality rather than being the source of solidarity, rebellion, freedom and pride that its proponents claim. It is something that makes it even more socially acceptable to hate women, and to disrespect anything feminine, as long as you aren't hating black males. Ideally, nobody would be hated because of gender or race. If I have something against a black person who is saying misogynistic things, glorifying violence and materialism, and acting like being arrogant makes him more desirable, it is the exact same thing that I would have against a white person who behaved this way. I read a survey in a newspaper showing that more young, white males listen to gangsta rap music than black people and women combined. The idea that it is the symbol of "black culture" is not only offensive and demeaning to black people, but also based on factual inaccuracies, assuming that what I read was true.

According to an article entitled "From Sweatshop to Hip Hop" from
Arc.org, Marian Salzman, the founding director of Chiat/Day, said the
following about the demographics of rap music listeners:

"A typical gangsta rap listener is a 14-year-old white boy from the
suburbs. An in-your-face attitude is a marketing hook that screams
authentic." - Marian Salzman

For a different perspective,I find this article interesting. Its author, a black female, sees gangsta rap as a symptom of a larger cultural problem. I'm not quite convinced that misogyny is the source of the evil, and would say that the polarization of gender expectations is actually the central issue, which just happens to include misogyny as one of its tentacles. I tend to fight just as hard for men's rights as for women's rights. People of both genders should be entitled to behave authentically, within ethical boundaries, without having to be shamed for being "pussies" or for being "mannish." Anyhow, here it is:

Race & Ethnicity: hooks: Misogyny, Gangsta...



Something I read earlier today related to this topic, and I thought it was relevant, even though it was about a white rapper:
8 Reasons Eminem's Popularity is a Disaster for Women (Sorry, Selene. I stole this from your blog, even though you took the other side of the debate. I agree with this wholeheartedly, whether you do or not.)
Gangsta rap was a phase of black culture birthed out of Regan era politics.

Its pretty much dead. The misogyny isn't going anywhere though.

Coke rap just doesn't sell like it used to, the gangsta image you're so antagonistic towards is complicated. Its paradoxically embraced and rejected on different grounds in different ways by different people. What it means for that suburban white kid won't mean the same to me.

For example, Tupac is to this day seen as raps greatest martyr and he pretty much embodies gangsta rap. While we reject a lot of the inner racism, gang banging/senseless killing and other negativity his music echoed (out of well...common sense) we embrace the honesty of his struggle and triumph over racism and traps created by the American government to essentially destroy or subvert black peoples.

Now that white suburban kid might hear that message but that sure as hell isn't why hes listening to Pac. Positivity exists within even gangsta rap-the positivity of overcoming rampant racism and institutionalized killings attributed to american government. Sure, theres a ton of negativity in there, but it isn't fake. Its real, and some of it very empowering.

Now, not all gangsta rap is pac-like, but major the themes are almost always reoccurring, sometimes recycled to the point of stagnation.
Whether its positively or negatively flipped is up to the artist.

Black culture has this habit of taking the negative and redefining it, imbuing what was once negative with a new, positive or contradictory meaning.

you follow, my *****?
 

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Does your concept of gender come from the environment you grew up in or the color of your skin? Do the white/hispanic people who grew up around you have the same perspective of masculinity?
Gender types are universal and cross cultural- there isn't a whole lot of room for divergence by definition of what we're talking about. There are only two genders and oh so many ways to interpret them.

My concept of gender comes from the universal, further interpreted through 'my culture' which I'm introduced to through environment. Color is incidental. Culture can transcend color (or maybe its the other way around..)

There is no one source of 'gender', we all experience the subjectivity of its reinterpretation. I can't speak for the white/hispanic people I grew up with; though I'm sure their perspective of masculinity differs from mine.

Chances are, not drastically.
 

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pinktees, what do you think of this?

What I call the ****** Fallacy is the idea that being black in America is a matter of culture, of how you talk and act and think and dress. It is the mistake that ******* make, who are white but try to act black. It is a fallacy because what makes you black is nothing like that. It is how white people act towards you because of how you look. Ask any black person who grew up in white suburbia listening to rock music and speaking perfect White English.
It is this fallacy that seems to lie behind the spread of the idea that Bill Clinton was the first black president. Or that Barack Obama – and the black middle-class in general – is “not black enough”.

The fallacy is rooted in a confusion between race and culture. Yes, Black America does have a culture of its own that is noticeably different from mainstream America. But that culture is a side effect of being black, not the cause of what makes people black.

The cause is racism: if you do not look white, then whites will not fully accept you as one of their own. Not even if you talk white and dress white and act white and think white and listen to white music. Not even if you die in some foreign land defending the country.

Not only do blacks who grew up in white suburbia know this, but so do Korean adoptees. Since the 1950s Korea has sent more than 100,000 babies to America. Most were brought up by white parents in white towns. They grew up white, knowing few if any Koreans, and yet they are not fully accepted either. Because of how they look. It has nothing to do with culture or money or education. It has to do with race.

The ****** Fallacy lies behind the phrases “not black enough” and “acting white” – that the key to being black (or white) comes down to how you act or think, that it comes from your values, your “background”.

But the truth is you are just as black whether you grew up in the ghetto or suburbia, whether you listen to rap or rock or both, whether you are Afrocentric or not. And, for the very same reason, no amount of acting white can ever make you white.

Both blacks and whites want you to act a certain way. Not all of them, but enough of them. They make you think that it is some golden road to being acceptable. But if you are not being yourself, how can that be acceptable? And will you ever be truly happy? And what lies at the end of their road?

What makes you “truly black” is living in a black skin in a white country, one that is still racist. The black experience, as they say. It is being yourself in a country that will never fully accept you for who you are.
(Source)
 

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lol I totally know what you mean and agree. The thing is, in the black community, as much as we talk about equality and social acceptance, a lot of us are worse racists than white supremacists; you wouldn't believe some of the things I've heard in all black company. Also, we can be incredibly intolerant of differences among ourselves - a black person who gets grades too high or acts too intelligent is deemed something of a traitor, and maybe be ostracized or even actively attacked. Sometimes black people (especially males) may act stupid or purposefully get bad grades and do poorly in general to because the pressure to conform is so great. this also goes for black people who have friends of another race that they hang out with often; again, it's like you're committing treason or something. Luckily, I grew up in a diverse pocket city in southern California, and most of the people there had been there since birth and everyone knew each other pretty well. I've never met another black INFP, though I expect there are a lot of us out there who cannot show ourselves for fear of social rejection.
i've never met another black infp either!
 

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There is indeed white culture...

Is there actually a black culture? To my knowledge there isn't a white culture. I think many of these characteristics that are being attributed to black men are also applicable to black women, as well as white men and white women who grew up in the same environment.

Gender itself is not definitive.

gen·der: the behavioral, cultural, or psychological traits typically associated with one sex.

Different societies have different roles/attributes that define gender. So to say that one culture is more masculine/feminine than another culture isn't really accurate. It is accurate, however, to say that one culture is more violent, selfish, inconsiderate of others, than another culture. Unfortunately, these traits are often misinterpreted as masculine. No particular race embodies that attitude even if one is more prevalent.
That's something I've heard a lot of people say, that white people are the lack of culture. This isn't true- it's just that theirs is the dominant culture, so everyone who lives in the U.S., no matter their race, is familiar with their culture. White customs include things like single family homes, white wedding dresses (the whole wedding ceremony, really), certain dances and music types (though now, music has largely become mixed). Also, in American white culture, the tendency toward individualism as opposed to group mentality, and challenging authority. There are white American parenting styles and child rearing practices, as well as burial rites. It always makes me kind of sad when people say that white people have no culture, when in fact many of the customs we take for granted as 'normal' are part of white culture.

Black culture though, I feel developed largely in response to white culture. For a lot of our history, struggle was all we knew, so struggle is the primary backbone of our culture. Ideals about overcoming adversity and fighting back against the white man are the cornerstones of our culture, and it's one of the reasons I feel like tensions are still so high; white people have come a long way in regard to racial acceptance and respect, and sometimes i feel like it gets overlooked in favor of the struggles of blacks. We lash out against any racism, whether real or only perceived, because it reinforces and validates out cultural values. I think now that the struggle is becoming less and less real (racism still happens, don't get me wrong) we are losing cultural identity. We don't have a language, customs, or culture of our own, so we hold tightly to the struggle against adversity to hold us together. Without it, what do we really have?
 

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It has a lot to do with social status, coming from working class background I remember it been very homophobic and masculinity driven culture.I think the more oppressed your group is the more you want to appear strong and united in the eyes of the oppressor, i.e not giving them more weapons to use against you such as "weak" homosexual image.As far as I see it the American peoples come from such a diverse backgrounds and is such a melting pot of cultures that apart from the Amish it's impossible to set the cultures apart.This discussion has been very interesting to view from an European point of view.As far as white culture goes, yes we have it!I think it's important to remember that not all white people come from America or other imperialistic countries.. "white man's burden" is not on my shoulders...
 
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