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List some of your favorite books (classics or popular are welcomed) and then others can join in and recommend books they have read that they think you might like...

I'll start with some old time faves:

Franny & Zooey
The Elegance of The Hedgehog
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
Fahrenheit 451
Harry Potter series
Daddy Long Legs

I'm sure there are many more efficient sites for this, like amazon and goodreads, but a lot of PerC people have good taste :)
 

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Some of my favorites are:
Les Misérables - Victor Hugo
Harry Potter - J.K. Rowling
Inkheart - Cornelia Finke
Percy Jackson - Rick Riordan
A Little Princess - Francis Hodgson Burnett
The Giver - Lois Lowry
Edenbrooke - Julianna Donaldson
The Wee Free Men - Terry Pratchet
Anne of Greene Gables L.M.Montgomery
Number the Stars - Lois Lowry
The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle - Avi
Almost any Shakespeare play

Just to name a few. I've mentioned this before, but I'm a picky reader. So these books are all ones that "passed the test", and kept my attention, to the point where I've thought about them for years afterwards. They are worthy, lol. I'd recommend any of them to just about anyone.
 

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Some of my favorites are:
Les Misérables - Victor Hugo
Harry Potter - J.K. Rowling
Inkheart - Cornelia Finke
Percy Jackson - Rick Riordan
A Little Princess - Francis Hodgson Burnett
The Giver - Lois Lowry
Edenbrooke - Julianna Donaldson
The Wee Free Men - Terry Pratchet
Anne of Greene Gables L.M.Montgomery
Number the Stars - Lois Lowry
The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle - Avi
Almost any Shakespeare play

Just to name a few. I've mentioned this before, but I'm a picky reader. So these books are all ones that "passed the test", and kept my attention, to the point where I've thought about them for years afterwards. They are worthy, lol. I'd recommend any of them to just about anyone.
Les Mis: Try Eugène Sue’s Mysteries of Paris and The Wandering Jew. Or you could be boring, and read Dickens and Notre-Dame de Paris.
Harry Potter: Read Jonathan Stroud’s Bartimaeus trilogy.
Any Shakespeare play: Schiller.Elizabethan & Jacobean drama - Marlowe, Webster, Massinger, Middleton, Tourneur, Fletcher & Beaumont. The Jew of Malta, Tamburlaine, The White Devil, The Changeling, The Duchess of Malfi, The Tyrant’s Play, The Revenger’s Tragedy, A Game at Chess, ’Tis Pity She’s a Whore. Volpone; A Mad World, My Masters.
 

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The Scarlet Pimpernel - Emma Orczy
The Awakening (and other short stories) - Kate Chopin
Jane Eyre - Charlotte Brontë
Because it is Absurd - Pierre Boulle
Time Out of Mind - Pierre Boulle
Death Comes as the End - Agatha Christie
Sparkling Cyanide - Agatha Christie
Phantom Tollbooth - Norton Juster
 

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The Scarlet Pimpernel - Emma Orczy
The Awakening (and other short stories) - Kate Chopin
Jane Eyre - Charlotte Brontë
Because it is Absurd - Pierre Boulle
Time Out of Mind - Pierre Boulle
Death Comes as the End - Agatha Christie
Sparkling Cyanide - Agatha Christie
Phantom Tollbooth - Norton Juster
Death Comes as the End and Sparkling CyanideInteresting choices for Christie. Why those two in particular?

How much Christie have you read?
If you’re after more character-driven books, I’d suggest Five Little Pigs, Towards Zero, Ordeal by Innocence and And Then There Were None. Possibly Sad Cypress and The Hollow, which are as much crime novel of character as they are detective stories.


There are the ‘Crime Queens’: Dorothy L. Sayers; Margery Allingham; Ngaio Marsh.

Christianna Brand is a better plotter than those three, and as tricky as Christie at her best; read
Green for Danger, Death of Jezebel, Tour de Force and Fog of Doubt.


Character-driven detective stories:


Nicholas Blake (pseudonym of Poet Laureate C. Day-Lewis):
Head of a Traveller, TCOT Abominable Snowman.


Anthony Berkeley.
Jumping Jenny (AKA Dead Mrs Stratton), Trial and Error, The Piccadilly Murder and The Poisoned Chocolates Case.


And if you’re interested in detective stories at all, John Dickson Carr, the master of the locked room, and the only writer to rival Christie for ingenuity and longevity.
And G.K. Chesterton’s Father Brown stories.


I’d also suggest Gladys Mitchell, whose books are witty, imaginative, and unorthodox, and boast the greatest woman detective: the shrieking cackling psychiatrist Mrs Bradley.
Mitchell’s best books are from before 1954; try Death and the Maiden, The Saltmarsh Murders, The Devil at Saxon Wall, Come Away, Death (Greece), Brazen Tongue or Tom Brown’s Body.


The Scarlet Pimpernel: Emmuska Orczy!
Rafael Sabatini’s Captain Blood and Scaramouche.

Georgette Heyer’s Regency romances.

Alexandre Dumas’s Three Musketeers.


Conan Doyle’s Brigadier Gérard.


Robert Louis Stevenson: The Black Arrow; Kidnapped; The Master of Ballantrae; Treasure Island.


Arturo Pérez-Reverte: Captain Alatriste books.


The Phantom Tollbooth: Norton Juster
Walter Moers, whimsical, inventive and exuberant. To give you an idea: The 13 ½ Lives of Captain Bluebear.

Being the demibiography of a seagoing bear, with numerous illustrations [Moers is a professional cartoonist] and excerpts from the “Encyclopaedia of the Marvels, Life Forms and Other Phenomena of Zamonia and its Environs” by Professor Abdullah Nightingale.

‘I should by lying (and everyone knows I’m not a liar by nature) if I claimed that my first thirteen-and-a-half lives were uneventful. What about the Minipirates? What about the Hobgoblins, the Spiderwitch, the Babbling Billows, the Troglotroll, the Mountain Maggot? What about the Alpine Imp, the headless Bollogg, the Bollogless head, the nomadic Muggs, the Captive Mirage, the Yetis and Bluddums, the Eternal Tornado, the Rickshaw Demons? What about the Venomous Vampires, the Gelatine Prince from the 2364[SUP]th[/SUP] Dimension, the Professor with Seven Brains, the Demerara Desert, Knio the Barbaric Hog, the Wolperting Whelps, the Cogitating Quicksand, the Noontide Ghouls, the Infurno, the Ship with a Thousand Funnels?What about Gourmet Island, Tornado City, the Sewer Dragon, the Duel of Lies, dimensional hiatuses, Voltigorkian Vibrobassists, rampaging Mountain Dwarfs? What about the Invisibles, the Norselanders, the Venetian Midgets, the Midgard Serpent, the revolting Kackertratts, the Valley of Discarded Ideas, the Witthogs, the Big-Footed Bertts, the Humongous Mountains?What about Earspoonlets, Time-Snails, Diabolic Elves, Mandragors, Olfactils, the Upper Jurassic Current, the smell of Genff? Mine is a tale of mortal danger and eternal love, of hair’s-breadth, last-minute escapes…but I mustn’t get ahead of myself!’

L. Frank Baum’s Oz books; The Wizard is the best known but in many ways the weakest, and certainly unrepresentative.
Try The Emerald City of Oz.


Michael Ende’s Neverending Story.

Also: Terry Pratchett and Jasper Fforde.
 

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Franny & Zooey
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
I've been meaning to read these two. I'm afraid I have only read the Harry Potter series, so I wouldn't feel comfortable recommending. However, you might like How Green Was My Valley by Richard Llewellyn or maybe I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith.

Some of my favorites are:
Les Misérables - Victor Hugo
Harry Potter - J.K. Rowling
Inkheart - Cornelia Finke
Percy Jackson - Rick Riordan
A Little Princess - Francis Hodgson Burnett
The Giver - Lois Lowry
Edenbrooke - Julianna Donaldson
The Wee Free Men - Terry Pratchet
Anne of Greene Gables L.M.Montgomery
Number the Stars - Lois Lowry
The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle - Avi
Almost any Shakespeare play

Just to name a few. I've mentioned this before, but I'm a picky reader. So these books are all ones that "passed the test", and kept my attention, to the point where I've thought about them for years afterwards. They are worthy, lol. I'd recommend any of them to just about anyone.
If you enjoy Shakespeare's comedies and you have yet to read The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, I would recommend that one. I'm not sure how interested you might be in Ancient Greek literature but much of Shakespeare's work has similar tales in Ovid's Metamorphoses. If you would like something a bit more sinister Medea by Euripides is anything but dull. Daphnis and Chloe by Longus is quite funny and charming in a very odd way.

Based upon the younger fiction that you enjoy, perhaps you might like The Girl who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making by Catherynne M. Valente or possibly something by Neil Gaiman?

The Scarlet Pimpernel - Emma Orczy
The Awakening (and other short stories) - Kate Chopin
Jane Eyre - Charlotte Brontë
Because it is Absurd - Pierre Boulle
Time Out of Mind - Pierre Boulle
Death Comes as the End - Agatha Christie
Sparkling Cyanide - Agatha Christie
Phantom Tollbooth - Norton Juster

If you like Jane Eyre you might like Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier. Certainly the two are very different narrators but similar gothic atmosphere and du Maurier has a beautiful way with words.


Books (or plays) I love other than what I already recommended:
The Odyssey by Homer
The Symposium by Plato
Much Ado about Nothing, As You Like It, and Hamlet by Shakespeare
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
Just Kids by Patti Smith
Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

Pretty much anything by Neil Gaiman and Catherynne M. Valente.
 

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Death Comes as the End and Sparkling Cyanide… Interesting choices for Christie. Why those two in particular? How much Christie have you read?
You're right on the money, I like these two for their characters: humble, plain, and independent woman taking an active role in the investigation...and who are also the object of romantic affection! I've read a bunch of Dame Christie's mystery novels and cannot remember all of them, though I do remember solving mysteries with Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple, and I remember And Then There Were None giving me nightmares... There are definitely some authors and books in there that have been recommended to me before, you just made them move up on the list! How about your favorite books?

Good stuff! Thank you for the suggestions, @Cosmic Hobo and @zenobia. :glee:
 

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Right! This is my current "Best of" list. Suggestions welcome!

(And, yes, it's long! My tastes are eclectic.)

BOOKS

Theatre


  • Euripides, Aeschylus, Sophocles & Aristophanes
  • Shakespeare
  • Jacobean tragedy—especially The Duchess of Malfi (Webster) and The Revenger’s Tragedy (Middleton)
  • Restoration & 18[SUP]th[/SUP] century comedy (Wycherley, Congreve, Sheridan, Farquhar, Goldsmith)
  • Lessing: Nathan der Weise
  • Goethe: Faust (NOT Werther!)
  • Schiller
  • Oscar Wilde
  • G.B. Shaw
  • J.B. Priestley
  • Noel Coward
  • Tom Stoppard
  • Peter Shaffer
  • Michael Frayn

Literature


  • Tales of E.T.A. Hoffmann
  • Alexandre Dumas
    • The Count of Monte Cristo
    • Musketeers books
  • Notre Dame de Paris (Victor Hugo)
  • Charles Dickens
    • Our Mutual Friend
    • Bleak House
    • Great Expectations
    • A Tale of Two Cities
  • Sherlock Holmes stories (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle)
  • The Wrong Box (Robert Louis Stevenson)
  • Ghost Stories (M.R. James)
  • Mr. Weston’s Good Wine (T.F. Powys, 1927)
  • I, Claudius (Robert Graves, 1934)
  • The Glass Bead Game (Hermann Hesse, 1943)
  • Jorge Luis Borges
  • Julian (Gore Vidal, 1964)
  • Italo Calvino: Cosmicomics (1965); If on a Winter’s Night a Traveller… (1979)
  • The Master and Margarita (Mikhail Bulgakov, 1967)
  • The Third Policeman (1967) (Flann O’Brien)
  • Umberto Eco: The Name of the Rose (1980) + How to Travel with a Salmon (1995), &c!
  • Ishmael (1992) (Daniel Quinn)
  • The Enchantress of Florence (2008) (Salman Rushdie)

Science fiction, fantasy & children's books


  • The Oz books (L. Frank Baum)
  • E. Nesbit
  • The Dr. Dolittle books (Hugh Lofting)
  • Mary Poppins (P.L. Travers)
  • Jurgen (James Branch Cabell)
  • The Once and Future King (T.H. White)
  • Gormenghast (Mervyn Peake)
  • The Phantom Tollbooth (Norton Juster)
  • Foundation series; The Caves of Steel; The Naked Sun (Isaac Asimov)
  • John Wyndham
  • The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (Douglas Adams)
  • The Neverending Story (Michael Ende)
  • Terry Pratchett
  • The Princess Bride (William Goldman)
  • The 13 ½ Lives of Captain Bluebear; Rumo and His Miraculous Adventures; The City of Dreaming Books (Walter Moers)
  • Bartimaeus trilogy (Jonathan Stroud)
  • Robert Rankin
  • Jasper Fforde
  • Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell (Susanna Clarke)
  • Johannes Cabal series (Jonathan L. Howard)
Doctor Who books
 

  • The Romans (Donald Cotton)
  • The Myth Makers (Donald Cotton)
  • The Gunfighters (Donald Cotton)
  • The Crusaders (David Whitaker)
  • The Doomsday Machine (Malcolm Hulke)
  • Ghost Light (Marc Platt)
  • Lawrence Miles: Alien Bodies; Interference; The Adventuress of Henrietta Street; Down
  • Jim Mortimore: Eye of Heaven
  • Dave Stone: Sky Pirates!
  • Paul Cornell: Love and War; Human Nature
  • Andy Lane: Original Sin; The Empire of Glass
  • Ben Aaronovitch: The Also People
  • Lance Parkin: Just War
  • Gareth Roberts: The Plotters
  • Paul Magrs: The Scarlet Empress; Verdigris
  • Paul Ebbs: The Book of the Still
  • Jonathan Morris: The Tomorrow Windows; Festival of Death
  • Justin Richards & Stephen Cole: The Shadow in the Glass


Comedy


  • 1066 and All That (Sellar & Yeatman)
  • Saki
  • P.G. Wodehouse
  • Evelyn Waugh
    • Decline and Fall
    • Vile Bodies
    • Black Mischief
    • The Loved One
  • Cold Comfort Farm (Stella Gibbons)
  • Roald Dahl
  • Puckoon (Spike Milligan)
  • The Pooh Perplex; Post-Modern Pooh (Frederick Crews)
  • George Macdonald Fraser
    • Flashman series
    • The Pyrates!
  • Riotous Assembly & Indecent Exposure (Tom Sharpe)
<snip: crime fiction>

Non-fiction

  • Tombs, Travels & Trouble (Lawrence Griswold)
  • Gerald Durrell: EVERYTHING

  • Life on Earth; The Living Planet; The Trials of Life (David Attenborough)
  • The Ancestor’s Tale; The Greatest Show on Earth (Richard Dawkins)
  • Life After Man; The New Dinosaurs (Dougal Dixon)

  • Modern Man in Search of a Soul; The Undiscovered Self; Man and His Symbols; Memories, Dreams, Reflections (C.G. Jung)
  • The God Delusion (Richard Dawkins)
  • Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human (Harold Bloom)
  • From Dawn to Decadence (Jacques Barzun)
  • Mother Tongue; A Short History of Nearly Everything (Bill Bryson)
  • The Story of Art (E.H. Gombrich)
  • Stiff (Mary Roach)
  • Alex’s Adventures in Numberland (Alex Bellos)
BDs

  • Tintin
  • Blake & Mortimer
  • Asterix
 

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You're right on the money, I like these two for their characters: humble, plain, and independent woman taking an active role in the investigation...and who are also the object of romantic affection!
In that case, I'd suggest The Pale Horse, Why Didn't They Ask Evans?, They Came to Baghdad, The Man in the Brown Suit, the Tommy & Tuppence books, The Secret of Chimneys / The Seven Dials Mystery, and 4.50 from Paddington all of which have the independent woman investigator! (Some of them are thrillers more than mysteries, although with surprise endings.)

You'd also enjoy Dorothy L. Sayers's books with Harriet Vane, a detective writer (probably INTJ) who is the sort of plain, independent woman investigator you describe - and there's more of a romantic interest than in Christie. On her first appearance, in Strong Poison, she is tried for murdering her lover, and cleared after Lord Peter Wimsey proves how the murderer committed the crime. Their courtship lasts four books.
 
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