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Hey, I'm just trying to make up a list of books I want to read before I die, and wanted to try to get some suggestions from other people.

I'm up for anything - fictional, nonfictional, graphic novels, etc~
 

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This is tough cause it's so personal and there's a bunch I still want to read. In terms of classics that I've read, ones prob worth reading are: The Trial, The Brothers Karamazov, The Fountainhead if you're younger, Independent People, Heart of Darkness, Grapes of Wrath, Brave New World...

Other particularly good books: Red China Blues if you have any interest in China/anthropology whatsoever. It's a really good memoir.
The short stories of Anton Chekhov/Tatyana Tostalaya... Basically, pick a Russian short story author, any Russian short story author. :)
Triomf by Marlene van Niekirk... Takes place in 1994 during South Africa¨s first free election and it centers on a really messed up family. Lots of raw emotion. It's stuck with me.
A Scarecrow's Bible by Martin Hyatt... If you or anyone is interested in reading gay fiction, this is the one book to read in the genre. It's the only not-totally-sappy, not-completely-ridiculous, not-shallow-plotted book there is. It's about this Vietnam vet in MS, and he's addicted to pills and deals with coming out to his crazy wife... Again lots of emotion, and the whole thing is told in second person, which gets you even more engaged with the narrative. It's another one that's really stuck, much to my surprise.

1001 Books You Should Read Before You Die
Aside from my suggestions, that might be a good start. I recommend Goodreads in general too! ;)
 

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CaesAug : I am sad to admit I've actually read that, pff. SO MANY HOURS I COULD'VE SPENT READING BETTER THINGS...

Lopare: Man, first post and I already have over a thousand books to read, ahahaha. x3 Anyones, a lot of yours sound good, and there're a couple on there I've read and enjoyed (mainly just a few classics in the first paragraph)!

I've heard Russian authors be suggested before, and I think I might give them a try now. And I'm definitely going to give A Scarecrow's Bible a try - I've always wanted to give gay fiction a try, but I could never find any that weren't...obviously gay fiction. They always seemed rather Anvilicious, to use tvtropes terms. And I always find all different kinds of cultures interesting, so Red China Blues I'm reading.

And yeah, I'm going to give the classics a try. C: And you have pretty good taste in books, so I trust that the ones you've listed are fun to read and not the ones that are a chore to read through!

Thanks a bunch!
 

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ooo this is one of my favorite subjects!!

The ROAD by Cormac McCarthy is a beautifully written book about a postApocalyptic America. While it does have a bleak overtone, the whole message of the book is that love and human relationships can persevere even in the roughest of times. (personally I love it because it isn't written like a Hallmark card. It's got layers.)
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey. This one is a classic. Just read it.
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. Oh my goodness. This book is short, sweet, whimsical and so deep, it makes the ocean look shallow. I think every "grown-up" needs to read this and get a grip! Sometimes it takes a childs point of view to truly see things as they really are.
Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. Mr. Bradbury is my hero. Plain and simple. Read all of his works quite honestly. Just go and check out every book by him your library has.
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. How else are you supposed to know that you need a towel, and the answer to life is 42?
Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie. Because it's my favorite book. So there.:tongue:
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenace by Robert M. Pirsig. Warning: Your brain will implode because he'll philosophize circles around you.
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells. It's one of my favorites of his, but really anything of his or Vernes you need to read.
The Prince by Machiavelli. Very interesting ideas about how to rule a people.
The Art of War by Sun Tzu. Very applicable to your life today.
The Republic by Plato. More philosphy of how to govern people, but Greek this time.
Common Sense by Thomas Paine.

I can think of a lot more, but I'll leave you with this for now. Do you have a favorite Genre? That helps in recommending books that you should read....very rarely do I find a book that I think EVERYONE needs to read before they die. (If I did, the list would be miles long! Once I started, I don't know that I could stop.):laughing:
 

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Read Think and Grow Rich by napoleon hill.
and also pick up How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie.

Once you're done with those two, read the 48 laws of power. Its a long but but worth it.
 

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The Human Zoo.
 

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The Tin Roof Blowdown- James Lee Burke (anything by Burke) fiction
Ava's Man- Rick Bragg (anything by Bragg) nonfiction
God Save the Sweet Potato Queens- Jill Conner Brown (only her nonfiction humor)
The Prophet- Kahlil Gibran philosophy
The Gift of Fear- Gavin De Becker nonfiction
The color of Water- James McBride nonfiction
The Birth Order Book- Dr. Kevin Leman nonfiction
 

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(i like psychological books. most are autobiographies on people's downfalls. but they are all incredibly interesting.)

Dry by Augusten Burroughs
Running With Scissors by Augusten Burroughs
Possible Side Effects by Augusten Burroughs
The Giver by Lois Lowry
I Am The Cheese by Robert Cormier
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Look Me In The Eye: My Life With Asperger's by John Elder Robison
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
 

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The Myth of Sisyphus by Albert Camus. Short but potentially earth-shattering.

The book that most changed my life was The Dharma of Star Wars, as crazy as that sounds. It is by Matthew Bortolin, and it was my crash-course in Eastern and Zen philosophy. Significantly altered the way I view, well, everything -- in a positive way.
 

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I have a feeling that once I finish The Road, I'll be recommending it to everyone... Anyway, here's what I have to add... It isn't much.

Dune by Frank Herbert
1984 by George Orwell
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card
A Song of Ice and Fire series by George R.R. Martin (There are currently four books, three more are planned.)
 

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The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
American Gods - Neil Gaiman
Good Omens - Neil Gaiman / Terry Pratchett
As many Discworld books as you can get your hands on - Terry Pratchett
Everyone Poops - Taro Gomi
The Sandman - Neil Gaiman (yes, the comic series)
 
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