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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i grew up in a small resort town in upstate n.y.
one of my 1st real jobs was a dish washer at a local dive for $ 1.00 per hour at age 13
then as a cherry/apple sorter at 15
16 i was digging ditch's for neighbors on account of the village installing public sewer
luckily it was mostly sand, downside was it was 3.5 ft deep and anywhere from 75-100 feet
all for $ 15-20 per job
 

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I worked in the laundry of the county infirmary (nursing home) in a rural upstate New York county. It was not pleasant at all. Most of the employees were very jaded and mean to the residents. I could handle the shit in the sheets but I couldn't handle the way the other employees treated the poor residents. That was probably the worst job I ever had.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I worked in the laundry of the county infirmary (nursing home) in a rural upstate New York county. It was not pleasant at all. Most of the employees were very jaded and mean to the residents. I could handle the shit in the sheets but I couldn't handle the way the other employees treated the poor residents. That was probably the worst job I ever had.
20 years ago i had a job at a rendering plant
i would have to go to local farms and pick up ''dead stock'' mostly cows who died while giving birth
occasionally i was required to shoot one, i did this for 3 months
nothing like hauling a 10 wheeler full of dead cows and horses
don't even mention the smell
 

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MOTM June 2015
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I lived in a rural town, and there were very few opportunities for employment. Only a handful of mom and pop type businesses. For the most part, the only employment available was babysitting.

My first job was babysitting for a 1 year old when I was 13. I was paid $1 per hour.

When I was 16, I worked for an elderly lady cleaning her house. I was paid $3 per hour. She had me scrubbing walls, ceilings and windows.

When I was 18, I was hired by a bill payment center as a data entry clerk. I received a whopping $645 per month for working 37 1/2 hours per week. I think it came out to around $4 per hour. woo hoo! Every billing account number started with an 8, and had 10 digits. It was one of the most boring jobs I have ever had. Entering data (account #'s and payment information) for 7 1/2 hours straight, 5 days per week. Ugh!
 

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I did a few errands for pocket change when I was a kid but my first actual job was bussing tables & washing dishes at a restaurant for $1.25 an hour when I was 16. My first paycheck had a note on it that read "Get a haircut or you're fired". The boss was always yelling at us & threatening to fire us. She wore bowling shoes with "8" on the backs of them. I hated the job but I hated being broke so I stuck it out until the end of summer. Got off work around midnight & rode my bicycle home on the shoulder of a highway without lights or reflectors. Dumb!! Delivered pizzas the next summer & it was way more pleasant & paid more. Got my first car & motorcycle for that commute.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I did a few errands for pocket change when I was a kid but my first actual job was bussing tables & washing dishes at a restaurant for $1.25 an hour when I was 16. My first paycheck had a note on it that read "Get a haircut or you're fired". The boss was always yelling at us & threatening to fire us. She wore bowling shoes with "8" on the backs of them. I hated the job but I hated being broke so I stuck it out until the end of summer. Got off work around midnight & rode my bicycle home on the shoulder of a highway without lights or reflectors. Dumb!! Delivered pizzas the next summer & it was way more pleasant & paid more. Got my first car & motorcycle for that commute.
i used to mow lawns for pocket money too
i had a penny saver route at 13 , it was almost 3 miles long
it had to be done by foot, no motorized vehicles, all for a whopping $3.65-7.00 depending on inserts
1st car was a ''73 datsun 510 wagon
 

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I had a PennySaver route just a few years ago. It was a walking route. I got paid nine dollars a week. My friends said, "Don't spend that all in one week." All I could buy with that were a few art supplies.
Now I am a freelance reporter/photographer for a newspaper owned by the same company. They are not overly generous with payment. I get paid per photograph and article. I also have a little gardening business. Gardening is definitely more lucrative than journalism.
No car yet.

i used to mow lawns for pocket money too
i had a penny saver route at 13 , it was almost 3 miles long
it had to be done by foot, no motorized vehicles, all for a whopping $3.65-7.00 depending on inserts
1st car was a ''73 datsun 510 wagon
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I had a PennySaver route just a few years ago. It was a walking route. I got paid nine dollars a week. My friends said, "Don't spend that all in one week." All I could buy with that were a few art supplies.
Now I am a freelance reporter/photographer for a newspaper owned by the same company. They are not overly generous with payment. I get paid per photograph and article. I also have a little gardening business. Gardening is definitely more lucrative than journalism.
No car yet.
i was a professional arborist for 25 years and a cornell graduate in plant pathology
i now deliver liquor because it pays much better
plus i actually now have benefits for the first time in my life
 

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I started working my first "real" job a week after I migrated to USA at age 17 as a busgirl at my auntie's restaurant. I got no pay, just sharing 25% of the tips from wait persons.

It was a point of no return for me when cash was placed in my hands that night. I never wanted to ask my parents for money from that point on and I've never stopped working except when I was laid off (twice in my 20's). There's no greater satisfaction than to make my own living so that I don't have to be told if I can or can't do something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I started working my first "real" job a week after I migrated to USA at age 17 as a busgirl at my auntie's restaurant. I got no pay, just sharing 25% of the tips from wait persons.

It was a point of no return for me when cash was placed in my hands that night. I never wanted to ask my parents for money from that point on and I've never stopped working except when I was laid off (twice in my 20's). There's no greater satisfaction than to make my own living so that I don't have to be told if I can or can't do something.
amen to that sister
the world is a much more aggressive place now then when we grew up
i do feel bad for the new generation, we at least could get a job that was not in retail or food service unlike now
 

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amen to that sister
the world is a much more aggressive place now then when we grew up
i do feel bad for the new generation, we at least could get a job that was not in retail or food service unlike now
I feel the same way when I look at teenagers and 20-somethings. The world seems highly competitive (fewer jobs and more qualified applicants).

Then again, my parents' generation the cars, houses, and food were so much cheaper that a father's income could afford to carry a family of 4, 5, or 6.

The only upside is that ppl are having less and less children (at least I think it's the trend). Many Asian countries the birth rate has been declining for the past 15 to 20 years.

The downside to this upside is that in the future, there will be less ppl taking care of old ppl.....
 

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I forgot to list my first car. It was the most horrible thing ever. I was so gullible that I let my dad talk me into it. Unlike my husband, my dad was clueless when it came to cars. Every car he picked out, seemed to have a never ending stream of problems.

My first car was an AMC Pacer. Don't remember the year, I just remember how horrible the car was. It was nicknamed the flying fish bowl car. My dad picked it out and after he got it home, I realized it had a wooden bumper with moon dog engraved into it. Yes, that is exactly what every teenage girl wants to drive. At least it was cheap.

Now for the good parts. The head lights wouldn't turn off unless I laid down on the floor and stuck my hand up under the dash, and pulled something to get them to turn off. To many years ago for me to remember what it was I had to pull. Oh, the door wouldn't open either so I first had to roll my window down with the crank, so that I could stick my arm out the door to pull the handle. Then after the door was open, I could lay down on the floor to find the part to turn off the lights.

The tires were shot within a few months, so I had to replace them. They were big tires and wiped out most of my money. Then after only a short while I noticed that the tires looked really worn. I could see wires sticking out. I took it to the garage to see what was going on, and they said the car had broken springs. (I think that's what they said, I don't know much about cars) They also said it would cost more to fix the car than it was worth.

Yes, I arrived in style with my flying fishbowl car with a wooden bumper engraved with the words moondog. The finishing touch to my arrival was rolling down the window so I could get out of the car. Yes, everyone should experience at least one such grand car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I forgot to list my first car. It was the most horrible thing ever. I was so gullible that I let my dad talk me into it. Unlike my husband, my dad was clueless when it came to cars. Every car he picked out, seemed to have a never ending stream of problems.

My first car was an AMC Pacer. Don't remember the year, I just remember how horrible the car was. It was nicknamed the flying fish bowl car. My dad picked it out and after he got it home, I realized it had a wooden bumper with moon dog engraved into it. Yes, that is exactly what every teenage girl wants to drive. At least it was cheap.

Now for the good parts. The head lights wouldn't turn off unless I laid down on the floor and stuck my hand up under the dash, and pulled something to get them to turn off. To many years ago for me to remember what it was I had to pull. Oh, the door wouldn't open either so I first had to roll my window down with the crank, so that I could stick my arm out the door to pull the handle. Then after the door was open, I could lay down on the floor to find the part to turn off the lights.

The tires were shot within a few months, so I had to replace them. They were big tires and wiped out most of my money. Then after only a short while I noticed that the tires looked really worn. I could see wires sticking out. I took it to the garage to see what was going on, and they said the car had broken springs. (I think that's what they said, I don't know much about cars) They also said it would cost more to fix the car than it was worth.

Yes, I arrived in style with my flying fishbowl car with a wooden bumper engraved with the words moondog. The finishing touch to my arrival was rolling down the window so I could get out of the car. Yes, everyone should experience at least one such grand car.
lol i can relate
i had a '73 pinto that was totally rusted out in order to start the car you had to pop the hood, remove the air cleaner and stick a pencil in the carb until it warmed up
the drivers door would not open and i had to put sheet metal on the floors due to rust
i had a hot date who had got all gussied up, dress, make up, new doo the works
we were driving to the restaurant and as i drove under a flooded under pass way over the speed limit
the passenger floor let loose thus soaking my date, she was totally drenched
hair was flat, all make up was running, she looked like a wet clown
i just looked at her soon after and just lost it, total hysterics, needless to say the date ended there and i never saw her again
 

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First car was a well used '70 Dodge Challenger. Loved it, looked good, fun to drive but I got the slow & cheap version. (318 V-8) A friend dusted me in a drag race with his mom's station wagon. First motorcycle was a '73 Honda SL100. Small but fun. Took me everywhere. Scary on the highway though because it topped out at 68 & cars blew past like I was standing still, especially uphill. Oddly I miss it more than the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
First car was a well used '70 Dodge Challenger. Loved it, looked good, fun to drive but I got the slow & cheap version. (318 V-8) A friend dusted me in a drag race with his mom's station wagon. First motorcycle was a '73 Honda SL100. Small but fun. Took me everywhere. Scary on the highway though because it topped out at 68 & cars blew past like I was standing still, especially uphill. Oddly I miss it more than the car.
i used to have a '72 cb 350 2 cylinder with a chopped exhaust and drilled out v.w. mufflers
in th:tongue:e winter i would take it on the bay with knobbies [no screws] and terrorize the ice fishermen
traded it for a '64 dodge van with a 3 speed stick, id kill to have them both back
 

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Started working early - eight years old - mowing lawns. It wasn't the typical pocket change endeavor, but was scheduled yard work. I started with an old mower my dad gave me, and by the end of my second summer I was mowing, edging, trimming, etc., with new equipment (including riding mowers) I had purchased with my proceeds. It was really funny dealing with an adult salesman in the Sears lawn and garden department, when purchasing my first riding mower. It was a big 8 hp with a thirty something inch deck. It had a pull start that would jerk your arms out of socket if it ever kicked back (from the compression). It was on clearance, so I got it for $800.

Did that for a few years, and then my folks moved to Wisconsin. Mowing season is short there (originally I was in Texas), so it was hard to make the equipment pay for itself. I dropped that and started delivering papers. Not as lucrative, but it was steady.

Used the proceeds from those jobs to buy a few guns (parents had to sign) and my first truck. It was a baby blue '66 Chevy step side. Dad was a decent mechanic (machinist by trade) and had shown me a few things, but I was clearly ignorant about the workings of the ICE in the modern automobile. Then my folks divorced and we moved back to Texas.

Towed a tandem axle U-haul from Wisconsin to Texas with that truck; my black & tan coonhound was riding shotgun the whole way. Truck had 2/60 air conditioning, so he was hanging out one window, while I was hanging out the other, trying to stay cool, the whole trip. (This was the summer of 1980, when there was a major heat wave over most of the central U.S.)

We made it in one piece, but about thirty miles from our destination, the truck wasn't shifting too good (it had a a three on the tree that would hang between gears, pretty regularly, if you weren't careful.) I babied it along, but when we pulled up in the driveway, there wasn't anymore clutch, and I was in a fix. I didn't know what a clutch was, wouldn't have been able to recognize one if you handed it to me. I had no idea how it worked, but I wasn't about to pay the $XXX it took to have one put in, so a couple of friends helped me on my first auto repair.

This move back to Texas meant that I didn't have a job and my lawn equipment was left in Wisconsin. I was seventeen now, short on cash, and started looking for a "real" job. Three months later, and not even a call back, I was a dejected little ISTJ. It was almost Christmas, I was broke, and I had no prospects and no presents for my family.

And then Sears called. I had put in an application months ago, but they sat on it and waited until they needed help for Christmas. Started me out at $2.65 and I was thrilled - even if it was in the boy's department. What I didn't know was that boy's was a part of children's, and the children's manager was good friends with the women's manager. So awkward as it seemed, I ended up working a lot in infants, toddlers, women's, and even women's lingerie. That last was embarrassing for a straight-laced Pentecostal youth, raised on hellfire and brimstone preaching.

Then, miracle of miracles, I was moved to display, where I sat up all kinds of displays, endcaps, etc., around the store. We did all kinds of cool projects that involved the manly stuff of using tools and building things. Tim Allen would have been proud.

And then one day it was my Saturday to work the half day in the store, meaning that I was on call for any mishaps and signage that needed changing. The phone rang and I picked it up.

"Hi, this is Ms. X, the Ladies dept manager. Could you come change a swimsuit on one of our mannequins? A customer wants to buy the one on display."

"Sure, no problem. I'll be right down."

Although the girls in display usually did this, I had done it before. It was display's job, so I headed down.

It was Saturday, and the store was packed. I felt awkward undressing this mannequin, and I guess it showed, because the catcalls started and wouldn't let up. I was totally embarrassed, my face was red and hot and I was shaking, due to all of the comments from the onlookers. I finally got it done, with the help of the kind lady on the sales floor.

That was it for me. I put in for a transfer to automotive. I had been doing a few things on my truck, and felt I was good enough to change out batteries and tires. Certainly seemed a lot safer than changing a mannequin's clothes on a Saturday.

...and here I am, some thirty-five years later. I've been a mechanic, counterman, parts manager, shop owner, and now a mechanic again. Who knows how it would have been different if not for that '66 Chevy pickup.
 
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