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Jung said:
Ordinary 'simple' feeling is concrete (q.v.), i.e. it is mixed up with other function-elements, frequently with sensation for instance. In this particular case we might term it affective, or (as in this book, for instance)feeling-sensation, by which a well-nigh inseparable blending of feeling with sensation elements is to be understood. This characteristic fusion is universally present where feeling is still an undifferentiated function, hence most evidently in the psyche of a neurotic with a differentiated thinking.
This makes it sound like neurotics are Thinkers (not necessarily that all Thinkers are neurotic :p). Can feelers be neurotic (especially feeler doms)? How would that manifest?
 

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I believe both Thinkers and Feelers can become neurotic/develop a disorder after a long time without any required vitamins for nervous system and constant tension, long and hard work without any breaks or/if they are highly sensitive.
I am pretty neurotic according to my family doctor, but it turned out my nervous system was simply malnourished. I mostly threw tantrums, yelled, answered grumpily and never had any motivation to do anything when I was forced to, refused to talk to people, my face turned paper white and hands started to shake every time someone opposed me. My muscles were almost always tense, except when I was asleep or extremely tired. I thought nobody understood me until I took a glance at my behaviour - it was awful.
More than a half of my family are highly sensitive/neurotic, so maybe this can be running in families?
 

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Stereotypes and generalisations possible.

Thinkers:
Am I performing well in a group? Are my efforts valued? Will people suddenly see me as a fake or imposter in time? The group is incapable of meeting my needs (am I sure they are realistic or too low) so why bother? What will happen when someone becomes better than me? Am I even good enough? I have to do everything alone because no one can help me..

Feelers:
Is such and such my fault because others 'say so'? What if I let others down and disappoint others? It is my job to take all the emotional struggles of others (?) Will I become a bad person if I stop caring about others for once? I feel [insert negative emotional state] this must be wrong, since I am not thinking of others? Will I be left on the shelf if I suddenly stop helping or initiating time with others? Discarded if I show emotions or sensitivity in front of others?
 

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This makes it sound like neurotics are Thinkers (not necessarily that all Thinkers are neurotic :p). Can feelers be neurotic (especially feeler doms)? How would that manifest?
Your interpretation is off, and I most certainly don't blame you. His writings are so cryptic. He writes that feeling mixed with sensation is exampled by a person that 'differentiates' thinking, in terms of MBTI meaning xSFx.
 

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He's saying that feeling as an 'affect' is more obvious in a neurotic thinking type. In his Te dom description he speaks of the feeling function manifesting as physical sensations, making them feel unwell in an attempt to divert them from their Te aims.

"Should the symptoms be functional, their peculiar formation may symbolically express the psychological situation; a singer, for instance, whose fame quickly reaches a dangerous pitch tempting him to a disproportionate outlay of energy, is suddenly robbed of his high tones by a nervous inhibition. A man of very modest beginnings rapidly reaches a social position of great influence and wide prospects, when suddenly he is overtaken by a psychogenic state, with all the symptoms of mountain-sickness. Again, a man on the point of marrying an idolized woman of doubtful character, whose value he extravagantly overestimates, is seized with a spasm of the oesophagus, which forces him to a regimen of two cups of milk in the day, demanding his three-hourly attention. All visits to his fianceé are thus effectually stopped, and no choice is left to him but to busy himself with his bodily nourishment. A man who through his own energy and enterprise has built up a vast business, entailing an intolerable burden of work, is afflicted by nervous attacks of thirst, as a result of which he speedily falls a victim to hysterical alcoholism."
 

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This makes it sound like neurotics are Thinkers (not necessarily that all Thinkers are neurotic :p). Can feelers be neurotic (especially feeler doms)? How would that manifest?
I would guess that feelers would be become neurotic through blends of thinking and sensation(?). Like suddenly becoming wrapped up in obsessive compulsive disorders that prompt them to take control of these elements of their environment? Touching the door twice before you leave somewhere, hanging up the phone when somebody calls and making them call back, etc. Of course, it could be more destructive than that. A sudden need to flee into the environment, to create any number of sense obstacles to confront.
 

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This makes it sound like neurotics are Thinkers (not necessarily that all Thinkers are neurotic :p). Can feelers be neurotic (especially feeler doms)? How would that manifest?
Don't quote me on this, but doesn't Jung also say that a neurosis can be brought on by people trying to create a false persona that goes totally against the grain? So let's say if an Fi dom tried to turn themselves into a Te dom because they think it's required (e.g. at work) they'd get neurotic?
I kind of know what you mean, Jung does bang on a lot of T types getting neurotic from suppressing their "natural feelings". But he often gets typed as ISTP, so he'd know more about neurosis from a T perspective and would stress that more simply because he didn't have a direct insight into Fs' neurosis.
 

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I don't think the Jung was talking about neurosis by medical terms as much as he was referencing the "propensity to experience social anxiety." This being said it is obvious both can experience this (and no doubt actual neurosis). It would be much more rare in most feeling types (especially sensors) however, as they stereotypically prefer the use of Fi and Fe, which by their very definition are "social" functions.
 

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Jung said:
Ordinary 'simple' feeling is concrete (q.v.), i.e. it is mixed up with other function-elements, frequently with sensation for instance. In this particular case we might term it affective, or (as in this book, for instance) feeling-sensation, by which a well-nigh inseparable blending of feeling with sensation elements is to be understood. This characteristic fusion is universally present where feeling is still an undifferentiated function, hence most evidently in the psyche of a neurotic with a differentiated thinking.
This makes it sound like neurotics are Thinkers (not necessarily that all Thinkers are neurotic :p). Can feelers be neurotic (especially feeler doms)? How would that manifest?
You've misinterpreted that Jung quote. Jung thought that all types could become neurotic — each in their own way — and that the most typical cause of neurosis was a too-one-sided attitude where the inferior function was overly suppressed. Jung said that anybody with a reasonably well-defined type would tend to suppress their inferior function to a substantial degree but that, in a non-neurotic version of a type, the inferior would still provide a lot of daily "compensation" to the dominant function. By contrast, if a type became too one-sided, with the result that the inferior function was suppressed to the point where it couldn't provide compensation in the more normal way, excess libido would build up in the unconscious that would ultimately cause the suppressed inferior function to produce neurotic symptoms of various kinds.

When Jung says, in that passage you quoted, that the fusion of feeling with sensation in the unconscious would be "most evidently [present] in the psyche of a neurotic with a differentiated thinking," he's just saying that the strongest cases of feeling-fusion will happen in cases where the feeling function is the most suppressed, and that most commonly happens in a T-dom who has become "neurotic" due to the over-suppression of their inferior F.
 

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He's saying that feeling as an 'affect' is more obvious in a neurotic thinking type. In his Te dom description he speaks of the feeling function manifesting as physical sensations, making them feel unwell in an attempt to divert them from their Te aims.

"Should the symptoms be functional, their peculiar formation may symbolically express the psychological situation; a singer, for instance, whose fame quickly reaches a dangerous pitch tempting him to a disproportionate outlay of energy, is suddenly robbed of his high tones by a nervous inhibition. A man of very modest beginnings rapidly reaches a social position of great influence and wide prospects, when suddenly he is overtaken by a psychogenic state, with all the symptoms of mountain-sickness. Again, a man on the point of marrying an idolized woman of doubtful character, whose value he extravagantly overestimates, is seized with a spasm of the oesophagus, which forces him to a regimen of two cups of milk in the day, demanding his three-hourly attention. All visits to his fianceé are thus effectually stopped, and no choice is left to him but to busy himself with his bodily nourishment. A man who through his own energy and enterprise has built up a vast business, entailing an intolerable burden of work, is afflicted by nervous attacks of thirst, as a result of which he speedily falls a victim to hysterical alcoholism."
As an interesting aside, mountain-sickness is what they called lung cancer from radiation poisoning in mines before they knew what it was : P
 
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