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I always score as either ISFP or ESFP, E/I being 45/55, 50/50 and so on... And reading the description of these two types none of them describes me more or less, they both appeal to me
 

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I always score as either ISFP or ESFP, E/I being 45/55, 50/50 and so on... And reading the description of these two types none of them describes me more or less, they both appeal to me
Well you CAN, there's no law making it illegal for you to identify as two types.

MBTI-wise though, it's incorrect. You're either ESFP or ISFP, but you can't be both.
The Extrovert/Introvert difference is one group is energized by social interaction, the other is energized by spending time alone.

You can also look into Inferior Functions to see which you relate to most.
Inferior Te -> ISFP
Inferior Ni -> ESFP

And lastly, don't trust online descriptions too much, especially if you're a Sensor. They're generally very stereotypical (and not in a good way), partly because it's hard to summarize an entire personality type and partly because most MBTI authors are Intuitives.
 

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Yes, you can, the 'types' were created by a human being, and were designed to help us improve our strengths and weaknesses and understand other types of people when working with them. Guess what? You are also a human being! You are complex. If you feel you fit into more than one description, then go for it!

And yes, you can be both an introvert and extrovert, or both of any of the 'preferences' (I certainly am).

MBTI was never meant to involve 'function' theory. I personally don't believe in the functions. You can believe what you like (I'm not up for debating this with any member).
 

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MBTI was never meant to involve 'function' theory. I personally don't believe in the functions. You can believe what you like (I'm not up for debating this with any member).
But what about mentions of Dominant function, Auxillary and so in MBTI books? I've read quite a lot of them including some quotes from Linda. Berens and they all used functions. I can bring quotes but I think most users here are familiar with them anyway.]
F.ex

https://lindaberens.com/resources/methodology-articles/cognitive-dynamics/

Functions—Cognitive Processes
After observing people through the lens of extraversion and introversion for a while, Jung came to realize that it wasn’t just an orientation to the inner world or outer world that made people different from each other. It was also important to consider what mental activities they were engaging in when they were in these worlds. Jung called these mental activities functions, based on the “function” being performed. Now they are frequently referred to as mental or cognitive processes. Jung described four cognitive processes and said that every mental act consists of using at least one of these four cognitive processes. Furthermore, these cognitive processes are used in either an extraverted or introverted way, making eight processes.
Jung classified the functions into two major groupings. He noted that there are two major kinds of mental processes. One is perception, a process of becoming aware of something. In the perceptive process, there is some sort of stimulation and we become aware of or attend to that stimulation. It is how we gather or access information. Jung called this an irrational process since the awareness simply comes to us.
Jung identified two kinds of perception: Sensation and Intuition. Instead of nouns, we use the gerund form of the works to signify that these are processes and therefore activities we can all engage in.
Sensing is a process of becoming aware of tangible information.
INtuiting* is a process of becoming aware of conceptual information.
Sensing and iNtuiting can both be done in either the external, extraverted world or in the internal, introverted world.
Se – extraverted SensingExperiencing the immediate context; noticing changes and opportunities for action; being drawn to act on the physical world; accumulating experiences; scanning for visible reactions and relevant data; recognizing “what is”. *Immersing in the present context.Si – introverted SensingReviewing past experiences; “what is” evoking “what was”; seeking detailed information and links to what is known; recalling stored impressions; accumulating data; recognizing the way things have always been. *Stabilizing with a predictable standard.
Ne – extraverted iNtuiting
Interpreting situations and relationships; picking up meanings and interconnections; being drawn to change “what is” for “what could possibly be”; noticing what is not said and threads of meaning emerging across multiple contexts.*Exploring the emerging patterns.
Ni – introverted iNtuiting
Foreseeing implications and likely effects without external data; realizing “what will be”; conceptualizing new ways of seeing things; envisioning transformations; getting an image of profound meaning or far-reaching symbols. *Transforming with a metaperspective.
The other kind of mental process identified by Jung is that of judgment, a process of organizing, evaluating, and coming to conclusions. Using the judging process, some sort of evaluation is made.
Jung identified two kinds of judgment: Thinking and Feeling, both of which can be used in either the outer, extraverted world or in the inner, introverted world. Simply put…
Thinking judgments are based on objective criteria or principles
Feeling judgments are based on personal, interpersonal, or universal values.
Te – extraverted ThinkingSegmenting andorganizing for efficiency; systematizing; applying logic; structuring; checking for consequences; monitoring for standards or specifications being met; setting boundaries, guidelines, and parameters; deciding if something is working or not.*Measuring and constructing for progressTi – introverted ThinkingAnalyzing; categorizing; evaluating according to principles and whether something fits the framework or model; figuring out the principles on which something works; checking for inconsistencies; clarifying definitions to get more precision. *Gaining leverage using a framework
Fe – extraverted Feeling
Connecting; considering others and the group—organizing to meet their needs and honor their values and feelings; maintaining societal, organizational, or group values; adjusting and accommodating others; deciding if something is appropriate or acceptable to others. *Building trust through giving relationships
Fi – introverted Feeling
Valuing; considering importance and worth; reviewing for incongruity; evaluating something based on the truths on which it is based; clarifying values to achieve accord; deciding if something is of significance and worth standing up for. *Staying true to who you really are
 

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If you want to be correct based on how MBTI currently works, then no. INFP is Fi > Ne > Si > Te, ENFP is Ne > Fi > Te > Si. Being both wouldn't make sense.

There's a lot of misinformation going around about what MBTI actually is. It's best to ignore the usual type descriptions and pay attention to the functions instead, as the descriptions can often be misleading and describe people of other types too. I don't know what Candy's talking about and it contradicts everything I've ever read about MBTI, but regardless of whether or not it was supposed to work differently before that's how MBTI works right now and it makes a lot more sense. Without the functions we're just making up stereotypes and sticking them onto people.
 

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I always score as either ISFP or ESFP, E/I being 45/55, 50/50 and so on... And reading the description of these two types none of them describes me more or less, they both appeal to me
This is a question you should be asking yourself, not asking the community.
Types exist entirely for the very purpose of separating personalities into individual frameworks, not for uniting them.

You can identify with 2+ types if you consider the MBTI typing system loose, unreliable, vague or inaccurate.
If you consider MBTI to be accurate however, then it's illogical to engage in vague self-typing.

Personally I can't say whether MBTI is accurate or loose and vague. I'd lean more towards loose and vague.
But it's best to arrive at the conclusion that it's loose and vague only after you've tried everything in your power to confirm it as accurate and failed.
 

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Linda.V Berens in her book "Introduction to the personality type Code" says:

"Preference isn't the same as Use
You can and do enagage all eight cognitive functions at diffferent times. Sometimes, when those uses become very habitual, it is hard to tell which is ot natural prefernce and which is our developed self"
 

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Well you CAN, there's no law making it illegal for you to identify as two types.

MBTI-wise though, it's incorrect. You're either ESFP or ISFP, but you can't be both.
The Extrovert/Introvert difference is one group is energized by social interaction, the other is energized by spending time alone.

You can also look into Inferior Functions to see which you relate to most.
Inferior Te -> ISFP
Inferior Ni -> ESFP

And lastly, don't trust online descriptions too much, especially if you're a Sensor. They're generally very stereotypical (and not in a good way), partly because it's hard to summarize an entire personality type and partly because most MBTI authors are Intuitives.
An intuitive person will think the descriptions to be stereotypical as well. A persons MBTI personality does not determine a persons likes or interests. There could be an INTJ who enjoys sports or physical activities. There could be an ESFP who enjoys class-based or mental activities.

A person can determine if they might have 2 personality type. It is possible for example to be 50% Introvert and 50% Extrovert. Same thing with the other variables. The descriptions are unreliable.
 

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An intuitive person will think the descriptions to be stereotypical as well. A persons MBTI personality does not determine a persons likes or interests. There could be an INTJ who enjoys sports or physical activities. There could be an ESFP who enjoys class-based or mental activities.

A person can determine if they might have 2 personality type. It is possible for example to be 50% Introvert and 50% Extrovert. Same thing with the other variables. The descriptions are unreliable.
I know descriptions are stereotypical and unreliable regardless of whether you're an intuitive or sensor, that's what my post said. I said especially sensors because intuitives seem to have less trouble understanding how how other intuitives' minds work than how sensors' minds work, and it really shows in the descriptions. This is why you end up with things like "all ISFPs are artists" or "all ESTPs are jocks" or "SJs blindly follow laws and traditions". Many sensors mistype as intuitives because of online descriptions, whereas intuitives as a whole seem to at least relate better to descriptions of their own type.

And no, whether going by functions or by the letters, in MBTI you cannot be both introverted and extroverted. Identifying as both probably stems from a lack of comprehension of what extroversion and introversion entail and/or a lack of understanding of oneself.
 

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Linda.V Berens in her book "Introduction to the personality type Code" says:

"Preference isn't the same as Use
You can and do enagage all eight cognitive functions at diffferent times. Sometimes, when those uses become very habitual, it is hard to tell which is ot natural prefernce and which is our developed self"
Well, this statement is a bit confusing, considering that: if we go by the assumption that no person is born with a fully-developed stack of functions, and the maturation process through his life involves the progressing maturation of his functions, then the whole concept of "natural preference" vs. "developed self" is void.

Let's say we take a Ni>Te>Fi>Se (INTJ) type. In his young years, his use of his tertiary and inferior (and possibly even auxiliary) would be quite shit. So his natural preference would be towards being very shit at his lower functions. For him to "develop" would be to attain better understanding, better control over, and learn wholesome utilization of his weaker functions.
It would be natural then to conclude that which ever functions this person developed by his 30's or even older, would be his natural preference.
Claiming that a person has a natural preference for Ni/Te, but saying he just ended up developing Ne/Ti better instead - doesn't yield any useful/workable data in regard to his personality, because you literally can't find any evidence to prove that a person who is strongly developed in Ni/Te was actually naturally born to be a Ne/Ti. It's a self-defeating oxymoron.

P.S. this could be a very arbitrary/untrustworthy method for some, but I really like the concept idea that you can determine a person's perceiving functions (Ne/Ni/Se/Si) based on how they use their eyes. For instance, whether they prefer to stubbornly stare into very specific directions or objects and then rapidly change the direction of their line of sight, like predators do, or whether they prefer to slowly/gently look over all of their surroundings, progressively taking in every direction/detail, like preys do. The way a person's eyes move is a fundamentally unconscious automatic process, which is definitely very different from person to person, and I don't think any means of "conscious development" could ever change that aspect in them.
If the movement of the eyes could be used as a reliable indicator of perceiving functions, then it could definitely be proven that you can't "overwrite" your natural type.
 
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