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For example, I feel more like an INFP but I was raised to be more practical so I have some mild ISFP tendencies. Do you think the way a person is raised might make them behave more like another personality type than the one they really are?
 
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Definitely. I grew up in a family that valued school, grades, and achievement over anything else, so that's why anyone at school who hasn't really talked to me would assume that I'm a judger. Subconsciously, anyway. They don't know MBTI, but they know the overachiever "type" when they see it.

Depending on what skills a person considers to be more important, they might choose to repress certain traits and bring out others. In addition, those under stress tend to exhibit a persona or withdraw or develop their shadow functions more.

But behavior isn't what determines type-- it's preference. It's about what would you choose over the other in most situations. It sounds like you're an INFP, but I can't be sure based on that information alone.
 

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Unless you undergo a traumatic episode, no--your type is with you from the time you are born til the time you die. It might not be completely obvious until one's an older teenager, but the way you are raised does not change your type.

However, the way you're raised does obviously have an impact on your personality, but not your type. For example, I went to a private-Christian school for middle school and high school--very conservative to say the least. This probably tempered down my "ENTP"ness if you will, but I've always been one, and always will, if that makes sense.
 

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Definitely. Although you might be a certain type, you may learn to repress certain traits and come across as something else. I don't believe you would actually change to a different type, you would just appear different.

Edit - duh, just post the exact same thing as someone else already said, why don't I...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Definitely. I grew up in a family that valued school, grades, and achievement over anything else, so that's why anyone at school who hasn't really talked to me would assume that I'm a judger. Subconsciously, anyway. They don't know MBTI, but they know the overachiever "type" when they see it.

Depending on what skills a person considers to be more important, they might choose to repress certain traits and bring out others. In addition, those under stress tend to exhibit a persona or withdraw or develop their shadow functions more.

But behavior isn't what determines type-- it's preference. It's about what would you choose over the other in most situations. It sounds like you're an INFP, but I can't be sure based on that information alone.
When I first read the MBTI descriptions, I actually thought I was an INTP, when I am anything but a Thinker. I'm much more of a Feeler. Once I realized that, I thought I was an INFP. Then, I realized that I'm not really spontanious so I started considering that I might of been INFJ. However, I realized that I am extremely disorganized, hate schedules, and hate having everything planned, so I went back to P. Then, I started considering that I mgiht be an ISFP because I don't always come up with ideas and am very affectionate and somewhat sensual---although being sensual doesn't neccessarily mean you're an ISFP. I also was going through a "importance of logic and common sense" phase because I thought it would make me seem more intelligent. I also read the Kiersay temperaments and while I knew I was really an Idealist, I denied it and considered myself a Rational to feed my ego. Now, I've realized that logic and common sense aren't always reliabe. They are merely things created by people so they could understand the world better. Although I verbally don't express myself well and would certainly do deeds to show my love, I wouldn't mind saying "I love you" and would rather make someone a card or poem than buy them a gift. Or, I would simply hug them to show my affection. The only reason why I don't make poetry too much is because my low self esteem encourages me that I would never be good at it. So, yes, I think I would generally consider myself a INFP. It's just that my mind changes constantly and I sometimes wonder if I'm another type. I also feel as if INFP is "too good to be true," too rare, and too wonderful for someone like me.
 

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My first type was ISTJ, when I was eleven, and like you, I had a "practical" phase, but it was more of what I wanted to be and how my parents idealized the perfect child. Then it was mostly INTP when I decided I didn't give a shit what my parents thought, and I've been to the extroverted and feeler side when my social skills started to develop more. It's for that reason that I set my personality as unknown. One of the members of this forum also tested as INFJ when she was 13 and now at 18 she considers herself an ENTP-- a HUGE difference.

So considering that you're 13, I'd read over the descriptions and functions just for an overview of the ways your mindset might change as you mature if I were you. But take everything with a pinch of salt. Your type isn't that important and you can definitely facilitate personal growth without knowing it, because chances are, you will change your mind about your type.
 

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yes, you can repress and encourage different sides of yourself. stress also has a huge effect- when people assume their shadow type they make a very good impression of having changed their whole personality.

when typing someone you should watch them when they are most contented and happy.
 

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Typing yourself on external behaviors is probably not the best way to go about things. Cognitive functions do manifest in certain ways, but we can learn behaviors associated with other types and even other cognitive functions, or have certain other factors, cause us to mimic those behaviors. For instance, I suffer from social phobia. If you're only familiar with MBTI profiles, and you were to meet me in person, you would easily assume, that I was an INFx.

Since you're concerned with INTP, ISFP, INFJ, and INFP, some things to consider, in terms of behaviors/motivations, might be this.

INTP's subjectively process logic and extrovert through considering possibilities where it could be applied in their environment. In terms of possible observable behavior, you might find an INTP quite content to stay idle and argue/consider hypothetical theories, all day. Ne is the second function, and it's not motivated to action, as much as considering. Ti is the primary, which bases logic on the subjective self.

INFP's subjectively process ethics and extrovert it through considering possibilities to apply it in their environment. In terms of possible observable behavior, you might find an INFP sitting with a distressed friend. It may be a part of their ethics to comfort this friend, but instead of observing them taking action on this, you might observe them idling sitting by, because Ne is driven to consider possibilities of how to best comfort the friend. "Do I hug them? Do I listen to what they have to say? Do I offer advice?"

ISFP's subjectively process ethics and extrovert it through taking action on possibilities in their environment. In terms of possible observable behavior, you might find an ISFP sitting with a distressed friend. If it's a part of the ISFP's ethics to comfort their friend, they may know the same possible ways to comfort a friend, that the INFP did, but what pops up first, is likely what they would do first. "How do I comfort them? I could hug them!" *ISFP hugs friend*

INFJ gets a bit tricky. Their perceptions are subjective, and they extrovert them through ethics. Subjective perceptions are not externally verifiable. For instance, if you were to point out a friend's actions would lead to disaster some odd years from now. You cannot externally verify this. You may extrovert ethics onto the group or individuals, in the sense that you take actions to protect them from foreseen implications of their unethical behaviors. This may be observable by witnessing an INFJ counseling a friend or group of friends, to their shock, about where their actions are going to lead them, and how they are inappropriate.
 

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It should be pretty traumatic or gradual to cause changes of this scale, but I wouldn't rule it out. It would necessarily have to be traumatic because people are creatures of habit, and your type, by extension, is a very well ingrained habit. Determinists would argue that no matter how much you change or "round out", you will always have a natural preference for, say, introversion, but I don't see why it's impossible to "round out" so much that you don't have a subconscious tendency to introversion anymore.
 

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INFP's subjectively process ethics and extrovert it through considering possibilities to apply it in their environment. In terms of possible observable behavior, you might find an INFP sitting with a distressed friend. It may be a part of their ethics to comfort this friend, but instead of observing them taking action on this, you might observe them idling sitting by, because Ne is driven to consider possibilities of how to best comfort the friend. "Do I hug them? Do I listen to what they have to say? Do I offer advice?"

ISFP's subjectively process ethics and extrovert it through taking action on possibilities in their environment. In terms of possible observable behavior, you might find an ISFP sitting with a distressed friend. If it's a part of the ISFP's ethics to comfort their friend, they may know the same possible ways to comfort a friend, that the INFP did, but what pops up first, is likely what they would do first. "How do I comfort them? I could hug them!" *ISFP hugs friend*
This is really helpful, actually. I toy with the idea (off and on) if I am really ISFP instead of INFP, even though I repeatedly come up with INFP. Your descriptions of how an INFP would act in that situation is exactly how I tend to react, considering the possibilities without acting upon them. Sometimes it feels like crap, like "I should comfort them, but I don't know which out of these options is the best way..." Eventually I feel like I have to act upon something because they're waiting and I should help them feel better.

So... thank you!
 

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I thought I was an isfp at first because I strongly related to the type, but the more I learned I was more INFP. I do have a strong sensing side though mainly because I grew up and was raised by sensors, so I tried to be like them and see the world as they do.
 
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