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I was reading this article about three things we can learn from psychopaths, and it has some interesting things to say. If hyperlink isn't working, here's the copy paste: http://time(.)com/3820209/3-things-psychopaths-teach-being-happier-person/ (take out the parentheses)

What do you guys think? I can definitely relate to some of the stuff in here, particularly the "just do it" mentality. I think also that NTs are the group most likely of any of the types to be considered psychopaths, mostly for our detachment and lack of empathy.
 

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Well, I think you want to year "yes" because a) you said you had these traits and b) you gave us an article supporting psychopathic characteristics....
otherwise, you're probably going to feel good about being called a psychopath because it's edgy and cool or something along those lines....

(Ignore random tangent of judgement above)

Haha, I think this is an article because it's supposed to bring a topic to discussion and not actually implement it in society because it's not relevant yet. Why else is it in an article? If it were something everyone knew, it wouldn't be publicized...yeah but then again a child is born what, every 4.2 seconds?

Well anyways, after going off on another tangent with absolutely no significance.

This article basically says the same thing every other "how to be more efficient/successful" article.

Focus On The Positive And “Just Do It”
Live In The Moment
Be Able To Uncouple Behavior From Emotion

This says the same thing but packaged differently (because publisher is targeted towards different people):
15 Things That Emotionally Strong People Don’t Do
 

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So you mean... can things psychopaths do possibly have a function? Uhm... yeah, I guess?
Could what they do be convenient for them? Contribute to their success in life? .... Uhm, yeah... I guess?

Though I feel like I can make the same claims about most things most people do.
 
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ASPDs and ive known a decent amount of clininically diagnosed ones are somewhat like the ultimate survival machines, they tend to be agressively narcisstic in the sense that they only care about satisfying their own needs and will not care if they have to decieve you into giving into their whims. they can be dicks about stuff fyi, avoid at alll cost. the ones i know, have given me plenty of headaches.
 

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we have a predatory instinct for survival, but too much of that just makes you a menace. I think most antisocials were neglected by their parents and had to fend for themselves.
 

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To themselves yeah.
To others? Don't count on it.
I think this is the crux.
It's good to be a psychopath
Psychopaths are not necessarily good for the group.

Say I was a project manager hiring a new team. I would view someone with psychopathic traits favorably for a position as a salesman for the group. Would I put them in HR? probably not. Would I want a CEO who had these traits? mmmmmmmmixed blessing. Maybe your company does well, maybe your company does well at your expense.
 

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I think this is the crux.
It's good to be a psychopath
Psychopaths are not necessarily good for the group.

Say I was a project manager hiring a new team. I would view someone with psychopathic traits favorably for a position as a salesman for the group. Would I put them in HR? probably not. Would I want a CEO who had these traits? mmmmmmmmixed blessing. Maybe your company does well, maybe your company does well at your expense.
Actually, funny story.
Someone I knew hired a psychopath as a "saleperson".
He extorted money from his customers and kept all the merch for himself.

Huh.
Nevermind, not funny at all.
See, thinking psychopaths would ever play by any rules is a bit... suicidal?
 

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Actually, funny story.
Someone I knew hired a psychopath as a "saleperson".
He extorted money from his customers and kept all the merch for himself.

Huh.
Nevermind, not funny at all.
See, thinking psychopaths would ever play by any rules is a bit... suicidal?
There are aaaabsolutely some risks and psychopaths don't come out and announce that they are psychopaths so there's that. However, the rules they play by are the same as everyone else: motivation. They're just not motivated to adhere to arbitrary or organizational rules unless their success is tied directly to them. I should start a company for psychopaths.. that could be a funny reality TV show.
 

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we have a predatory instinct for survival, but too much of that just makes you a menace. I think most antisocials were neglected by their parents and had to fend for themselves.
My mom hugs me, smothers me and has told me she loves me every day since I was born, and I'm the most antisocial person you could possibly imagine.
 

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No.

Snakes in Suits said:
Mistaking Psychopathic Traits for Good Leadership

Early research by psychologists and psychiatrists suggested that the behaviors of most psychopaths were too dysfunctional to make long-term survival in organizations possible and that they might be better suited to work on their own or in some other career. But based on ourown research and that of others, we now know that some organizations actively seek out and recruit individuals with at least a moderate dose of psychopathic features. Some executives have said to us, “Many of the traits you describe to us seem to be valued by our company. Why shouldn’t companies hire psychopaths to fill some jobs?” A proper, scientific answer is that more research is needed to determine the impact of various doses of psychopathic characteristics on the performance of different types of jobs. The “optimal” number and severity of such characteristics presumably is higher for some jobs (such as stock promoter, politician, law enforcement, used-car salespeople, mercenaries, and lawyers) than for others (such as social workers, teachers, nurses, and ministers). Until such research is done, we can safely say that those who believe that “psychopathy is good” clearly have not had much exposure to the real thing.

Anyone working with or for a psychopath will be painfully aware of his or her destructiveness. For an organization, one psychopath, unchecked, can do considerable harm to staff morale, productivity, and teamwork. The problem is that you cannot choose which psychopathic traits you want and ignore the others; psychopathy is a syndrome, that is, a package of related traits and behaviors that form the total personality of the individual. Unfortunately for business, the “good” traits often conceal the existence of the “bad” when it comes to a psychopath.

An important reason for mistaking a true psychopath for a leader is that a talented psychopath can easily feign leadership and management traits sought after by executives when making hiring, promotion, and succession planning decisions. A charming demeanor and grandiose talk can easily be mistaken for charismatic leadership and self-confidence. Furthermore, because of its critical importance to effective leadership, charisma, when it is found in a candidate, can lead to a “halo” effect—that is, a tendency for interviewers and decision makers to generalize from a single trait to the entire personality. The halo effect acts to “fill in the blanks” in the absence of other information about the person and can overshadow more critical judgments. As mentioned earlier, even seasoned researchers — who know they are dealing with a psychopath — are often fooled into accepting things at face value.

The ability to influence events and decisions and persuade peers and subordinates to support your point of view are critical executive management skills. Not everyone has these skills at the level required by general management jobs. Organizations constantly seek people with these skills and invest significant sums of money in training, coaching, and development of staff to improve them. To find someone who seems to have a natural talent for influence and persuasion is rare. When found, it is hard for decision makers to look past it. We know that psychopaths are masters of conning and manipulation — especially if covered over by a deceitful veneer of charm — leading to the perception that they have strong persuasion and leadership skills.

Visionary thinking, the ability to conceptualize the future of the organization, is a complex skill requiring a broad perspective, the ability to integrate multiple points of view, and a talent for looking into the future — that is, to think strategically. Psychopaths are not good at establishing and working toward long-term, strategic objectives; they are much more opportunistic. Yet they can weave compelling stories about situations and events of which they know very little into surprisingly believable visions of the future. Because visioning is so difficult for the average person to understand, it is little wonder that the vague but convincing, illogical but believable, rambling but captivating, and compelling but lie-filled discourses of the psychopath (see sidebar below) can look like brilliant insight into what the organization should do. This is especially true in times of crisis, when few can make these lofty predictions and many are looking for leadership to fill the vacuum.

In the last and most decisive battle for Gaul, the enemy was mercilessly overpowering Julius Caesar’s army. His troops were significantly outnumbered and they were surrounded; the end seemed near for Caesar and his long campaign to take Gaul. But seeing that all would be lost, he put on his armor and his bright crimson cloak — so he would be easily seen by the enemy — and led his reserve troops into the middle of the battle. Still outnumbered, his troops rallied, and the enemy soldiers, realizing that they were being charged by Caesar himself, faltered. History records Caesar’s victory, his valor, and his fighting acumen. We know that he was charismatic, a strong orator, influential, and persuasive, and a visionary leader whose strategies are still taught in military schools to this day. Was Caesar a great leader, or was his success the result of psychopathic impulsivity and extreme risk taking by himself and his soldiers?

It is important to note that psychopaths — like great leaders — are risk takers, often putting themselves and others (in Caesar’s case, his own life and that of his army; in the case of business, the entire company) in harm’s way. Risk taking, often difficult to quantify or differentiate from foolhardiness, is a trait that closely lines up with what we expect of leaders in times of crisis. But how much risk is appropriate? How much risk will be effective in saving the day or, in more mundane business settings, achieving objectives? Another trait, impulsivity, accentuates risk-taking behavior, leading to acting without sufficient planning and forethought. And thrill seeking often involves taking dangerous risks just to see what will happen. Elements of extreme impulsivity and thrill seeking can also be mistaken for high energy, action orientation, courage, and the ability to multitask, all important management traits.

Despite the risks to his own life, Caesar’s risk-taking behavior in this last battle for Gaul was far from psychopathic. He was a prudent risk taker, sizing up the realities he faced, the resources he (and the enemy) had, the probabilities that would influence the outcome, and the risk to his legion posed by not taking a risk. He was also not a thrill seeker, at least not to the degree exhibited by psychopaths. He and the Roman legion he commanded were a disciplined machine, hardly the image of a rampant leader and his band of psychopaths fighting for the thrill of it.

Psychopaths’ emotional poverty — that is, their inability to feel normal human emotions and their lack of conscience — can be mistaken for three other executive skills, specifically the ability to make hard decisions, to keep their emotions in check, and to remain cool under fire. Making hard decisions is one of those management tasks that executives have to do on almost a daily basis. Whether it is to choose one marketing plan over another, litigate or settle a lawsuit, or close a manufacturing plant, all major decisions have emotional components that must be dealt with. Nonpsychopathic executives are often required to suspend their own emotional reaction to events in order to be effective. They have feelings, but the constraints of their jobs often preclude them from sharing them with others, except family members or close confidants. Of particular importance, as dictated by some business realities, is appearing cool and calm in the midst of turmoil. One can imagine Caesar calmly putting on his red robe as he contemplated the possibility of his own death.

Certainly, New York City mayor Rudolph Giuliani did so for extended periods in the aftermath of the World Trade Center attacks, and he has been credited with keeping the city under control as the problem was analyzed and dealt with.

In summary, we suggest that it is easy for someone — anyone — to confuse behavior that is psychopathically motivated with expressions of genuine leadership talent. This is especially true when the prospective new hire has an arsenal of skills and traits that can be ef- fectively packaged as leadership talent, when the persona is so tightly bound up in business expectations, and when the psychopathic fiction “I am the ideal leader” is so effectively staged.
 

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There are aaaabsolutely some risks and psychopaths don't come out and announce that they are psychopaths so there's that. However, the rules they play by are the same as everyone else: motivation. They're just not motivated to adhere to arbitrary or organizational rules unless their success is tied directly to them. I should start a company for psychopaths.. that could be a funny reality TV show.
Do you even have any idea what psychopathy is?
Or has watching too many movies derp'd you in the head?
 

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*looks at thread title*

*facepalm*

*reads post*

*2x facepalm combo*
 

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I'm thinking out loud.
Do you disagree with something I said or do you want to be condescending instead?
Both.
I mean you're enamoured with hollywood psychopathy, so why not do both?
I mean seriously, for one thing ASPD is an actual mental illness with actual brain irregularities.
Want to know which part of the brain it is?
Impulse control.
Know what impulse control is?
The controller of impulses and shit.
 

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Both.
I mean you're enamoured with hollywood psychopathy, so why not do both?
I mean seriously, for one thing ASPD is an actual mental illness with actual brain irregularities.
Want to know which part of the brain it is?
Impulse control.
Know what impulse control is?
The controller of impulses and shit.
I don't think i've watched anything with psychopaths in it except part of that Christian Bale flick. You haven't told me anything I don't know yet either. I actually studied psychology in my undergrad soooo it's a familiar topic, as far as uni goes, which I admit isn't very deep sometimes.

You didn't point out which part you disagree with yet.
 

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I don't think i've watched anything with psychopaths in it except part of that Christian Bale flick. You haven't told me anything I don't know yet either. I actually studied psychology in my undergrad soooo it's a familiar topic, as far as uni goes, which I admit isn't very deep sometimes.

You didn't point out which part you disagree with yet.
Poor impulse control.
Do I really have to point it out to you?
 

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It can help you get things done and detach from otherwise difficult or painful situations, sure.

But you're missing out on some incomparably beautiful parts of life and hurting others in the process.


Is it really a fair trade?
 

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I want you to spell it out so you can see how thin it sounds when you say it.
Kfine.
Simple math, poor impulse control = less ability to be controlled.
Less ability to be controlled + self-centeredness = complete inability to be integrated into any kind of team-oriented action, with or without any threats <since that just makes the threatener a target>.

Any questions?
 
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