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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wondering if I could/should give modified versions of the MBTI test to my future students (in school to become an Elementary teacher, prefer grades 3-5)? If so, could I use that information to teach to my students more effectively? I have a few questions to answer before I even consider this:

1. Do MBTI types change over time? Or was I an INFP/xNFP all this time?
2. Do people with different primary learning functions (Si, Se, Ni, Ne) learn in different ways? For example, do all or most Si-Dom/Aux people like to learn the same way? Is learning preference the same as learning effectiveness*?
3. Is even the fifth grade (ages 10-11) too early to conduct a test like this?
4. Any teachers on here who try this out? What are your experiences with it?

If you don't mind, it would be nice (if you're confident in your MBTI type) to post your primary learning function, and how best you learn, whether that's from the past or now.

*This is the main critique of multiple learning styles, BTW.
 

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I would not give tests to them as it is unethical. But I have successfully used my personal observations of my students to adapt my teaching to their preferred functions.
It has worked well for me so far, because I praise them for their strengths, rather than criticizing them or lumping them all together in a conformist way.
 

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PS: I don't actually set my students differentiated tasks according to their functions. They all have to do the same work and everybody has to take part in every activity. But in my previous job I appointed my INTP kid master of vocabulary, my ISFJ master of explaining the details of grammatical rules, and Ne-doms master of wacky ideas. I explicitly pointed it out to them that these are their strengths and praised them for it.
 

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Just based on what I understand about different types..

Ni users like to learn material by going through it all and understanding it for themselves. Although they still prefer a structured environment and probably would choose to have a lecture with an instructor of some kind. A lot of details can seem daunting to Ni users so having someone who presents it to them would be appreciated. After you do that part as a teacher, however, don't expect Ni users to require much else from you. After that initial lecture, they very much enjoy being on their own to understand the information. **As an INFJ this is what works best for me.

Ne users are quite different from that. They are more likely to want independence during the learning process, and wouldn't mind if there wasn't an instructor or anything too structured. Just leave them with the books, don't expect them to want to follow along. But they would still require someone who could answer questions they have (and there's probably a lot of them), or get into an interesting discussion to understand the material better. So, kind of opposite to the Ni users, they probably would prefer independence at first, then some kind of interaction. Edit: Actually, sorry. I think I actually had Ne-aux users in mind when I wrote this up. Ne-doms would probably first start with the question asking. However, most teachers that I've encountered do not really support that kind of environment until after the material is presented.

Si users generally want structure and like to know what is expected of them to learn. If I had to bet, I'd say Si users are ones who ask teachers "What's going to be on the test?" They will go back and review that kind of information so that they can perform to the best of their ability. So for them, they would appreciate being given the information and then being guided during the learning process. For Si users, repetition can be their best friend. Giving them new ways to remember different types of information would also probably be appreciated, as they are very capable of storing tons of info. While Ne users prefer to be asking questions, I think Si users would prefer answering questions. So as a teacher, ask Si users questions to see what they can recall and what they've actually understood.

Se users I really am not sure about. I would say to fuel their Se you'd want to focus on trying to hold their attention and give them novelty. What assignment can you give them that would allow them to go out and find answers themselves? I think that's the kind of thing Se users would really appreciate. When I think of "class project", Se is the function that comes to mind.

Also, I'm not a teacher, but I may someday like to be.
 

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I honestly think MBTI changes over time.

As a kid I was the very definition of an ENFP. Now? No way.
 

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I honestly think MBTI changes over time.

As a kid I was the very definition of an ENFP. Now? No way.
Your type does not change, your functions develop, or you were/are stressed when typing yourself at that time/now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Appreciate all of the responses so far. I'll edit this post to something more substantial after I get to my laptop.

Specifically, would any Se user want to give their $0.02?
 

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1. Do MBTI types change over time? Or was I an INFP/xNFP all this time?
2. Do people with different primary learning functions (Si, Se, Ni, Ne) learn in different ways? For example, do all or most Si-Dom/Aux people like to learn the same way? Is learning preference the same as learning effectiveness*?
3. Is even the fifth grade (ages 10-11) too early to conduct a test like this?
4. Any teachers on here who try this out? What are your experiences with it?

If you don't mind, it would be nice (if you're confident in your MBTI type) to post your primary learning function, and how best you learn, whether that's from the past or now.
1. According to MBTI type theory, type preferences are innate, though you can effectively learn how to use the other preferences. They liken it to handedness-typically you tend to prefer one hand over the other when writing, but you can learn to use both.

According to Jung type can change over time.

2. What makes perceiving functions "primary learning functions?" I'd say judging functions are just as, if not more so important in a lot of cases when it comes to learning.

3. Yes. The official MBTI assessment is designed for 14+ or those with at least a 7th grade reading level. There is another assessment for children called MMTIC.


Given my learning disabilities, I'm not sure how I best learn. I tend to stay away from textbooks because I have a hard time with comprehension. I get away with average grades based on my ability to wing it. I think there's something to the Kolb learning styles though. Http://www.businessballs.com/kolblearningstyles.htm


Edit: You might find thispaper from Dario Nardi interesting:

http://www.darionardi.com/CAPT1998paper.doc
 

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According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.
How did they determine that type is innate? Did they measure the types of young children, then measure them again when they were adults? If this is true, I am an ENFP. I had a happy, relatively stress free childhood, and I had the personality of an ENFP back then. Ever since adolescence I've been under stress, and I now have the personality of an IXTJ.
 

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An ENTJ on YouTube said school is Te driven. It states the most common, most predictable result as a presumable fact.
Ti users do not understand. Ti doesn't think like this. Ti sees exceptions to rules.

99 people have the bubonic plague. Te will say the 100th person will get the plague too.
Ti will say the 100th person may not have gotten the plague, everyone is different. Some people have great immune systems. Maybe someone found a cure before the 100th person got exposed.

The answer the school wants is Te. A Ti kid will get a big red mark over whatever answer they put, and be confused why their logic is "wrong" while Te logic is "correct".


As a Ti-Ne user I learned best by being told what pages to read then reading them on my own.
I also learned by watching the adult do something, trying to figure out the pattern in my head while they did it, then listening to a short description of the key part of the concept.
Then I would do it myself, and have questions after my attempt. Mostly about what to do when there are exceptions.

If there are 20 steps, don't tell me all of them. Just tell me the 1 that is the key to understanding it.. The faster the teacher talks and the faster they throw concepts at us, the more energized I get and the easier it is to learn. Going slow destroys all that potential energy and makes paying attention tasking.




I hated when I spent a lot of time learning and reading then doing whatever artsy book report project we had to do, then seeing the xSxJ kids who bought fancy organizers and have good art skills getting bonus points! I felt ashamed that my projects were more Ne and less xxxJ.
 

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According to Jung type can change over time.
That's not true, actually. Jung was referring archetypes as changing, in that we assume different psychological roles in different life situations. That is different than his functional attributes.
 

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That's not true, actually. Jung was referring archetypes as changing, in that we assume different psychological roles in different life situations. That is different than his functional attributes.
Lol ok please cite the source you think I'm referring to. :p
 

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I wasn't referring to any specific source, but I'll provide sources to back up my claim:

  1. Can you change your personality type? - CAPT.org
  2. Can Personality Type Change over Time?
Well I was hoping that you were referring to my source so that you could recall it for me (I had forgotten where I found it!). Nevertheless, I did find it again! I got it from the following interview with Jung.

Here is the quote: "type is nothing static. It changes in the course of life"

Skip to 8:45:

The problem with trying to cite official MBTI sources on this particular question is that they don't explain how they came to this conclusion. I'm looking for an explanation in the MBTI manual and this is all I found so far:

"Type theory assumes that children are born with a predisposition to prefer some functions to others."

How did they form this conclusion? Why do they assume this? No explanation so far.
 

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Here is the quote: "type is nothing static. It changes in the course of life"
The gripe I have with this quote, is that you don't really know what Jung is exactly referring to; functions developing? behavioral changes caused by developing functions? different psychological roles for different life situations?

Which is the reason why I provided sources for Jung's belief, and he is either contradicting himself, or the quote does not mean what you think it means.

The problem with trying to cite official MBTI sources on this particular question is that they don't explain how they came to this conclusion. I'm looking for an explanation in the MBTI manual and this is all I found so far:

"Type theory assumes that children are born with a predisposition to prefer some functions to others."

How did they form this conclusion? Why do they assume this? No explanation so far.
It was Jung's belief that core types are immutable:

“Such a widespread distribution could hardly have come about if it were merely a question of a conscious and deliberate choice of attitude. In that case, one would surely find one particular attitude in one particular class of people linked together by a common education and background and localized accordingly. But that is not so at all; on the contrary, the types seem to be distributed quite at random… Since the facts show that the attitude-type is a general phenomenon having an apparently random distribution, it cannot be a matter of conscious judgment or conscious intention, but must be due to some unconscious, instinctive cause. As a general psychological phenomenon, therefore, the type antithesis must have some kind of biological foundation.”
 
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The gripe I have with this quote, is that you don't really know what Jung is exactly referring to; functions developing? behavioral changes caused by developing functions? different psychological roles for different life situations?

Which is the reason why I provided sources for Jung's belief, and he is either contradicting himself, or the quote does not mean what you think it means.



It was Jung's belief that core types are immutable:
He was talking about psychological type.

Another possibility is that he changed his opinion over the 30 year difference between the release of the book and the interview... Though I suppose you could technically categorize that as a contradiction. :p

About the quote, you are right, and I normally make this distinction but forgot, Jung believed that the attitude types (E/I) are innate.
 

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How did they determine that type is innate? Did they measure the types of young children, then measure them again when they were adults? If this is true, I am an ENFP. I had a happy, relatively stress free childhood, and I had the personality of an ENFP back then. Ever since adolescence I've been under stress, and I now have the personality of an IXTJ.
In the MBTI Manual Third Edition there are chapters that talk about many studies done on separate identical twins that give a clear positive correlation coefficient for specific traits being "innate" from birth. Specifically, the I/E dichotomy is very well founded, and not just in MBTI either, but in general psychology.

It is only open to dispute how much influence conditioning has on the individual. The current trend among most psychologists is that the influence is about 50/50. Thus, at least half of your personality is innate in any case. MBTI, and most models of personality, focus on the innate aspects of personality, because it is almost impossible to account for every single subjective variable that goes into conditioning a person's behavior. However, it is quite possible to isolate specific personality traits by doing a factor analysis of traits and referring to statistics.

If the subject of personality psychology deeply fascinates you, I highly recommend that you post-pone drawing any strong conclusions until you take an introductory course in general psychology at your local community college, so that you have a professor with whom you can get more direct information.
 
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