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yes when under stress your mind may attempt to use some other 'circuits' it is not used to using and you will feel as if you have switched types
this may not correspond with your consciously realizing that something is stressing your out in environment
this may last days, weeks, months

however your natural type never changes as that would require your brain to actually physically restructure itself
 

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yes when under stress your mind may attempt to use some other 'circuits' it is not used to using and you will feel as if you have switched types
this may not correspond with your consciously realizing that something is stressing your out in environment
this may last days, weeks, months

however your natural type never changes as that would require your brain to actually physically restructure itself
Erm... I'm not sure, but why is it so inconceivable for a person to shift naturally without having undergoing some sort of emotional or physical stress?

It's just an idea I have, but what if we weren't confined to either 'yes' or 'no', 'on' or 'off' switchboards? What if it was more like a... range of comfortableness we tended to pull from? I know my perspectives on black-and-white issues are... well, they've been described as simply not fair. But it's really how I see things.

So for someone over a process of months/years to shift their range slowly from one category to another... that just doesn't seem so impossible to me. When someone used to prefer solitude, then later finds themselves seeking the company of others.

Because having to lock somebody into the small confines of one category is just so... I think people are much more dynamic than that. And personally, I'm more willing to attribute personality to a result of socialization than biology. So maybe that's the reason for our different perspectives. :proud:
 

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Erm... I'm not sure, but why is it so inconceivable for a person to shift naturally without having undergoing some sort of emotional or physical stress?

It's just an idea I have, but what if we weren't confined to either 'yes' or 'no', 'on' or 'off' switchboards? What if it was more like a... range of comfortableness we tended to pull from? I know my perspectives on black-and-white issues are... well, they've been described as simply not fair. But it's really how I see things.

So for someone over a process of months/years to shift their range slowly from one category to another... that just doesn't seem so impossible to me. When someone used to prefer solitude, then later finds themselves seeking the company of others.

Because having to lock somebody into the small confines of one category is just so... I think people are much more dynamic than that. And personally, I'm more willing to attribute personality to a result of socialization than biology. So maybe that's the reason for our different perspectives. :proud:
Because your personality is related to neurology of your brain - the actual wiring of your neurons to each other. For your personality to change your brain cells actually have to develop new connections and drop some of the old ones. Most of what I read on personality formation supports the conclusion that personality does not alter significantly after mid-late teens. At this point a good deal of your brain growing and wiring itself has been completed. There are still some changes into 20s and 30s but nothing radical sans if you suffer some kind of heavy trauma. People may also think that they have changed personalities when they start developing that tertiary and inerior function into their adult life. In MBTI sense this is also supported by descriptions of 'shadow' personality types that people enter under stress - because it is underdeveloped brain regions that get put into use, we usually make very clumsy use of them. No matter how hard I may try to become an ESTP right now my brain just doesn't have the capability to rewire itself for me to ever be naturally comfortable being an ESTP for prolonged periods of time.
 

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Because your personality is related to neurology of your brain - the actual wiring of your neurons to each other. For your personality to change your brain cells actually have to develop new connections and drop some of the old ones. Most of what I read on personality formation supports the conclusion that personality does not alter significantly after mid-late teens. At this point a good deal of your brain growing and wiring itself has been completed. There are still some changes into 20s and 30s but nothing radical sans if you suffer some kind of heavy trauma. People may also think that they have changed personalities when they start developing that tertiary and inerior function into their adult life. In MBTI sense this is also supported by descriptions of 'shadow' personality types that people enter under stress - because it is underdeveloped brain regions that get put into use, we usually make very clumsy use of them. No matter how hard I may try to become an ESTP right now my brain just doesn't have the capability to rewire itself for me to ever be naturally comfortable being an ESTP for prolonged periods of time.
Thank you for the clarification. I must admit, I'm very much not a positivist-type person so thinking of biology and black-and-white is just not my strong suit. It's the same trouble that I have when dealing with Universal Grammar in Second Language Acquisition. If all languages are a switchboard of values, why do the values have to be either 'yes' or 'no' and what would happen if a person's Universal Grammar was more flexible compared to others? Is that maybe a reason for difference in language learners? A bit off topic, I know, but now I think I see the difference in where our starting perspectives lie.

So, I think I understand what you're saying. It's easier to think of it when I'm looking at the MBTI through functions instead of the separate preferences. And I suppose I can never resist the temptation to ask 'why not?'
 

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But the corpus callosum can re-coordinate lots of things specifically verbally, right?
 
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