Personality Cafe banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The last year or so I've started hanging out with more people who are more outgoing. I've always been kind of quiet, guess a sort of wall flower. But I've been more out going, more comfortable in my own skin and i talk to about anyone around me now... has my personality type changed since I'm more outgoing or am i still just me?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I feel ya! I'm actually wondering the same thing, because when I took the test I got enfp, but I go through phases were I am not an exuberant ball of energy...at all. Sometimes I disappear and become hermit like and then BAM i'm back in fall force.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,225 Posts
I came to the conclusion that you cannot. The core of ones personality is so deeply rooted that the only way for you to change would be to stop being yourself. This indirectly means that your current being would cease to exist, which isn't a step I'd be willing to take. In fact, I don't even think I could, assuming it was possible.

There certainly are phases and moods that have impact on ones behavior and your personality type may fluctuates slightly when taking a test in a certain mood/mindset, deep down however you're likely to fall back into your old pattern. Friends and/or surrounding definitely contribute and make it easier to change ones habit as opposed to being by oneself or in an unhelpful environment.

Seeing how you are an ENFP officially I find it weird you struggled to be outgoing in the first place. ENFP's are the type that even managed to warm me up to a degree and pull me out of my comfort zone(s) successfully. They were always socially top notch from what I remember of the only ENFP I've ever known - though there admittedly have been phases when she would withdraw and dive into a world of thought for a bit. The genuine happy nature never ceased to exist in any point though.

ENFPs are pleasant people to be around for all I know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I stay pretty upbeat most of the time and i'm always really passive when it comes to conflict but i'll talk to anyone now and i used to be really quiet unless i knew you so maybe i'm just me but louder? hah that makes all kinds of sense right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
I think that you're core personality does not change. But I do think it changes in the sense that you use different functions in different situations, so it may seem like a personality change. I am ENTP, but under a lot of stress or depression, I might turn more INTJ-ish. There are other times I might go more INTP, or even INFP. My personality didn't change, I just use other functions that suit my mood better or are more helpful to the situation. But I will always go back to ENTP, those are my preferred functions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,225 Posts
I stay pretty upbeat most of the time and i'm always really passive when it comes to conflict but i'll talk to anyone now and i used to be really quiet unless i knew you so maybe i'm just me but louder? hah that makes all kinds of sense right?
ENFP's are really bad when dealing with conflict.

You may want to quickly read through the brief sum up here.

ENFP Relationships

As stated above however, your core personality is likely to never alter again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Well that makes sense I didn't think about using different functions, just figured the more comfortable I am with other people the more comfortable I feel being myself
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,208 Posts
I read answers on this question a lot of times on this forum and the generally stated opinion of those who study MBTI much more carefully than me is that you cannot change. Mostly with the argument of Erbse, "the only way for you to change would be to stop being yourself". Which I take as a hint that if you stop being yourself, you can change (obviously ;)).
What I want to say more directly: I am definitely an ISTP. Now. But I can swear on my grand-father grave that I definitely wasn't one in my youth. While ISTPs have an extroverted sensing function, mine was non-existing for my first 10 years of life. I was floating around on my imaginary cloud, I was regulary stepping in the pile of trash while my mum was sweeping and I didn't even notice it, once she made a huge christmas tree in the middle of the kitchen and I didn't notice it until she asked me what I think about it, I was stuck in my room with only books and nothing else to feed my senses, just writing poems and fantasizing up and inventing theories and planning to become a neurophysic ...
And now, 15 years later, I'm like that Jack Russell dog thriving on outside details and I totally lost all of my imagination abilities I had as a child. Now you might call me a late bloomer but what I think is that if you try hard enough and long enough, some of your habits will change so much that they won't be your habits anymore. This I ascribe to my mum, a full-proof perfectionistic ESTJ who hated my cloudiness. And as she's very persuasive, she tried day-by-day from my birth to bring me down to earth until she made it. She also tried to make me J but this one didn't work. My guess is that my dad is ISFP, so it was easier for me to become S for two-sides influence, while for P we stick together ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
I feel ya! I'm actually wondering the same thing, because when I took the test I got enfp, but I go through phases were I am not an exuberant ball of energy...at all. Sometimes I disappear and become hermit like and then BAM i'm back in fall force.
ENFP's tend to be the most introverted extrovert types. Mostly because trying to be Ne dominant in a world that doesn't like Ne is exhausting, but also because you direct your Ne towards the maintenance of relationships, which is exhausting in and of itself. A lot of ENFP's I know need to have breaks to recharge like introverts do. ENTP's can be the same way, but its not as bad because our Ne is directed towards concepts and things rather than people.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
I read answers on this question a lot of times on this forum and the generally stated opinion of those who study MBTI much more carefully than me is that you cannot change. Mostly with the argument of Erbse, "the only way for you to change would be to stop being yourself". Which I take as a hint that if you stop being yourself, you can change (obviously ;)).
What I want to say more directly: I am definitely an ISTP. Now. But I can swear on my grand-father grave that I definitely wasn't one in my youth. While ISTPs have an extroverted sensing function, mine was non-existing for my first 10 years of life. I was floating around on my imaginary cloud, I was regulary stepping in the pile of trash while my mum was sweeping and I didn't even notice it, once she made a huge christmas tree in the middle of the kitchen and I didn't notice it until she asked me what I think about it, I was stuck in my room with only books and nothing else to feed my senses, just writing poems and fantasizing up and inventing theories and planning to become a neurophysic ...
And now, 15 years later, I'm like that Jack Russell dog thriving on outside details and I totally lost all of my imagination abilities I had as a child. Now you might call me a late bloomer but what I think is that if you try hard enough and long enough, some of your habits will change so much that they won't be your habits anymore. This I ascribe to my mum, a full-proof perfectionistic ESTJ who hated my cloudiness. And as she's very persuasive, she tried day-by-day from my birth to bring me down to earth until she made it. She also tried to make me J but this one didn't work. My guess is that my dad is ISFP, so it was easier for me to become S for two-sides influence, while for P we stick together ;)
I feel the same way. I was very much an Anne of Green Gables until I was about 17, (INFP) very imaginitive and extremely in my head. I tested INFJ throughout college and beyond, and realized one day the inventory and me didn't really get along well. (granted it wasn't the official inventory) I wonder if this is an S thing but I wanted examples of what they were asking, I didn't get a lot of the questions. The more I simply started analyzing the letters and theories behind it, I have about 90% confidence in my type as ESFJ based off of the actual letters. Now when people start trying to describe the full type I get kinda weirded out because I don't see myself as that extroverted. My energy is definitely more outward than inward now, and I am comfortable around people, and when excited about a topic or situation I can be extremely bubbly and animated, but I am also very happy being at home researching something I am into or typing on forums. I think I mask as an introvert because most of my social interaction is online due to life circumstances, but whether you change or grow into your true self is up for debate, but I agree, as a child I don't think this is technically accurate until you settle into yourself
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,678 Posts
I was a text book ENFP child and as an adult I have changed a bit but still feel like ENFP 95% of the time. The introverted spurts make me question my type at times as well, but this is apparently very common among ENFP types.

My husband is a classic ISTP but having him describe himself as a kid and a teenager he sounded more INTP. His dad is an ISTP as well so I wonder if it's from his influence...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
I read answers on this question a lot of times on this forum and the generally stated opinion of those who study MBTI much more carefully than me is that you cannot change. Mostly with the argument of Erbse, "the only way for you to change would be to stop being yourself". Which I take as a hint that if you stop being yourself, you can change (obviously ;)).
What I want to say more directly: I am definitely an ISTP. Now. But I can swear on my grand-father grave that I definitely wasn't one in my youth. While ISTPs have an extroverted sensing function, mine was non-existing for my first 10 years of life. I was floating around on my imaginary cloud, I was regulary stepping in the pile of trash while my mum was sweeping and I didn't even notice it, once she made a huge christmas tree in the middle of the kitchen and I didn't notice it until she asked me what I think about it, I was stuck in my room with only books and nothing else to feed my senses, just writing poems and fantasizing up and inventing theories and planning to become a neurophysic ...
And now, 15 years later, I'm like that Jack Russell dog thriving on outside details and I totally lost all of my imagination abilities I had as a child. Now you might call me a late bloomer but what I think is that if you try hard enough and long enough, some of your habits will change so much that they won't be your habits anymore. This I ascribe to my mum, a full-proof perfectionistic ESTJ who hated my cloudiness. And as she's very persuasive, she tried day-by-day from my birth to bring me down to earth until she made it. She also tried to make me J but this one didn't work. My guess is that my dad is ISFP, so it was easier for me to become S for two-sides influence, while for P we stick together ;)
You say you've changed growing up, but you say your personality didn't, right ? I think personality is what we are, and if we change, our personality changes too... of course there are some traits that we can try to hide or deny but that characterize us since we were born: that's the character.. But our personality is supposed to develope somehow. Don't you guys think ?!
I'm very fascinated by this classification of the 16 types, but at the same time I don't feel like trusting it fully. I mean, personalities are so complex.. everyone is special their own way.. so sometimes it's really hard to define things properly, and when we want to classify at any costs we risk to "minimize" those peculiarity that maybe are the most characteristic part of our personality and reduce it in a "box". (- I'm sorry for the syntax !! so sleepy ...night!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
only if you lie. haha. i want to be enfp...and yes, i can have extroverted phases, but ultimately i'm introverted. although I love group discussions (and this swayed my results to enfp at the beginning) i don't share my immediate thoughts/deeper feelings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
What I want to say more directly: I am definitely an ISTP. Now. But I can swear on my grand-father grave that I definitely wasn't one in my youth. While ISTPs have an extroverted sensing function, mine was non-existing for my first 10 years of life. I was floating around on my imaginary cloud, I was regulary stepping in the pile of trash while my mum was sweeping and I didn't even notice it, once she made a huge christmas tree in the middle of the kitchen and I didn't notice it until she asked me what I think about it, I was stuck in my room with only books and nothing else to feed my senses, just writing poems and fantasizing up and inventing theories and planning to become a neurophysic ...
That fits the theory to a tee. You don't start life with all functions fully developed, but kind of ease into them one by one. So before the age of ten, you would basically be just an I_TP, with the S developing later. Check http://personalitycafe.com/myers-briggs-forum/1037-how-personality-types-develop.html for more background...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
Well, to keep it short and to-the-point: NO

Here is a longer explanation:
You simply are in the process of discovering new areas of yourself that you have not yet seen before, but don't get confused, it's IN YOU already right from the beginning. We develop our cognitive functions gradually as we age, and so it is inevitable that we see change in ourselves as we mature--not as a result of personality change, but of a development of renewed perspective on things.

As a crude example:me growing up as as an INFJ, I was more attuned with Ni and Fe. Then I fell in love with my Ti before college years and quickly learned to use it. Later in midlife, I will then have a stronger grasp on my inferior function: Se. Then there's the other 4 "shadow" fucntions which make understanding ourselves much more complicated.

We often get surprised when we act a certain way that deviates from our usual conception of "me". Then we start to ponder, "Oh, maybe I'm not like this, after all." or, "I have changed my personality in response to my environment."

Well, probably not, to say it again, it's just you using your lesser "trained" functions. After all, maybe this is the reason why many of us will undergo or have undergone mid-life or quarter-life crises.

This article is really a huge help: (I'm a newbie and restricted to post links yet)
Sticky: Intro to Function Theory + More Detailed Descriptions of Each Function Attitude
It's in this forum as well, under "Cognitive Functions"
:happy:
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top