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You visit a local museum and find yourself wide eyed with fascination as you walk down the quiet hallways, marveling at the exhibits in the display cases.Your imagination spins stories about what you see, and you wonder what it would be like to be a museum curator or display artist. You’re more comfortable in an imaginative setting like this than in the hectic office where you work. If this is a scenario that could happen to you, you may be an ISFP personality type—introverted, sensing, feeling, perceiving—and there are some jobs that are better suited to you than others.


Personality Features of ISFPs
To find the job that is best suited for you, it is important to first understand your personality type. The Brigg’s Myer Type Indicator Test lists 16 personalities. Among them is the ISFP. ISFPs tend to be quiet and introverted with strong feelings of empathy for others. ISFPs are creative and sensitive, dislike strict regimens and routines and prefer visuals and art to facts and figures. Kindness and service are common virtues of an ISFP.


ISFP Positive Work Situations
ISFPs are successful at work when they are given autonomy to freely exercise their creative gifts; they understand the values that motivate them and prefer to follow their ideas through to conclusion with little interference. Because they are introverted, they work well alone, but their innate kindness makes it natural for them to try to help others.


ISFP Negative Work Situations
ISFPs do not enjoy mundane tasks but will perform them if necessary. They prefer spontaneity to routine and dislike being confined to the ordinary. ISFP personalities are sensitive to their environment and can become anxious if they are overwhelmed or feel they are failing. ISFPs are also uncomfortable in structured settings that suppress personal creativity or freedom.


ISFP Skill Sets
ISFP personalities enjoy working in the present and are good short-range planners. Their amiable and helpful personalities make them pleasant to work with. Because ISFPs want their work to matter, they have a strong work ethic and a well-developed sense of responsibility. ISFPs care about what they do and like to please.


ISFP Personalities Need Work That Matters
ISFP personalities need to know that their work has merit and makes a difference; they are seldom satisfied with working solely for monetary gain. Their strong work ethic and service-oriented tendencies compel them to try hard to please, as long as they have the freedom and space to work in their own way.


The Best Job Options for ISFP Personalities
Because of their empathetic and artistic natures, ISFPs are well-suited for service and creative careers, as well as jobs in which they can work independently. ISFPs appreciate an aesthetically pleasing and nonhectic environment. The following job types are a few career suggestions: clergy, social worker, counselor, therapist, physician, nurse, nutritionist, personal fitness trainer, coach, dancer, chef, teacher, veterinarian, museum curator, interior designer, firefighter, jeweler, writer, artist and pilot.


Conclusion
True ISFP personalities are rare, making up only 6 percent of the population. They are individualistic, creative and caring. ISFPs are friendly, but they can be sensitive and may react negatively to criticism or advice. The ISFP personality enjoys living in the moment and works best in a less stressful environment. Because ISFPs are service-oriented, they make ideal counselors, teachers and caregivers. ISFPs’ strong work ethic and desire to serve makes them invaluable employees.




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All of this fit me very well.
Museums are awesome! :cool:
 

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All too often I have seen the ISFP guides overlook arts professions altogether, forgetting that there are other jobs out there besides business administration and health care!

And, I was basically raised in a museum, some of the happiest times of my life.
 

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The following job types are a few career suggestions: clergy, social worker, counselor, therapist, physician, nurse, nutritionist, personal fitness trainer, coach, dancer, chef, teacher, veterinarian, museum curator, interior designer, firefighter, jeweler, writer, artist and pilot.

Those [bolded] are the only ones I could see myself doing. I think I would be miserable working in a museum because I don't find that sort of stuff very interesting. Social worker, therapist, physician, nurse, etc... don't get me wrong, I love people and love helping them, but for a living? No thanks.
 

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Do you think that there are alot of restrictions and/or rules as far as being a teacher goes? And possibly quite stressful at times?
 

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All of this fit me very well.
Museums are awesome! :cool:
It fits me, as well...which makes me feel lonely. 6%!?

I thought about being a personal trainer, but because I like lifting and going to the gym, working in a gym would seriously take all of the fun out lifting weights.

I tried to get a degree in Counseling, but none of the colleges I applied to accepted me. I guess I'll keep trying.
 

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I agree with the description 100% - but some of the jobs the suggest don't exactly jive with the description. Nurse and physician, for example, are VERY stressful jobs - you have to be on your feet all the time, and yes you get to help people but there is little to no down time and us ISFPs could get easily stressed out with a job like that. I'm surprised freelance graphic designer isn't on there... or photographer. These seem more like ISFP jobs.
 

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Do you think that there are alot of restrictions and/or rules as far as being a teacher goes? And possibly quite stressful at times?
I have a relative who works as a teacher, and from what I see, her job is no fun at all. Full of responsibilities, expectations etc. Personally I do enjoy the teaching role, but I am more like an part-time instructor rather than a professional teacher.

The same thing also goes for 'nursing' and 'firefighter'. I signed up to undergo training to be a Civil Defence voulenteer (unfortunately they could not get enough people and the training programme had to be called off :sad:), but never thought of becoming a professional and doing it for a living.

How about adding 'bartending' to the list? Somehow it feels quite appealing to me.
 

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Museums seem to be very ISTJ actually. It's the same mindset you would encounter in a bank--not that that's a bad thing. There can be a creative side, but mostly it is conservation.

That's an interesting point to make. Thanks.

I wonder why things like pastry chef, cake decorator, or florist aren't on there. I think those would make sense too.
 

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Dammit, I actually like the idea of being a physician or counselor, but they're SO DEMANDING. I feel so stuck...And I don't want to have a career that makes less than 60-70 k =_= But I hate stress. This is so irritating. I wish someone could just tell me what I'm destined to do, so I won't have to worry whether I'll go into the wrong field or not.
 

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I want to be an accountant, because i'm good with numbers and i think i can see myself working at that... do you think is a good ISFP carreer choice?
 

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The following job types are a few career suggestions: clergy, social worker, counselor, therapist, physician, nurse, nutritionist, personal fitness trainer, coach, dancer, chef, teacher, veterinarian, museum curator, interior designer, firefighter, jeweler, writer, artist and pilot.

My daughter who is an ISFP has been studying Fashion Design this year and last year completed a course in Christian Ministry and Theology.For the next couple of years she wants to study Interior Design.When she was younger she wanted to be a Veterinarian,but changed her mind because she didn't like the idea of having to euthanise an animal in distress or an unwanted one.All of these careers are on @Aerorobyn's list except for the fashion design one,but I think it fits the ISFP personality type.
 

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I am a software engineer and I am good at it. Never into theory though. After so many years in profession, I am finding difficulty to manage schedules and people.

I would rather design a project in detail and let others implement it :)
 

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If your an outdoors type isfp I'd reccomend environmental conservation or landscape gardening. Different locations to stimulate ya senses, great work variety, out in nature is great for yer soul and a very rewarding job. That's what I do and I love it :happy:
 
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