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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wish I would have taken an MBTI test before I graduated with my BA...and before I started on a MS, but since I didn't I'm now stuck in a conundrum: continue with a career as a Speech-Language Pathologist (despite the amount it drains me due to my introversion) or pursue a master's in Library Sciences? I've looked at various lists of "recommended" careers for ISTJs, but they're all pretty narrow.

So - for those of you ISTJ's who enjoy your careers: what do you do?

Are there any ISTJ SLPs out there who enjoy their job?
 

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I wish I would have taken an MBTI test before I graduated with my BA...and before I started on a MS, but since I didn't I'm now stuck in a conundrum: continue with a career as a Speech-Language Pathologist (despite the amount it drains me due to my introversion) or pursue a master's in Library Sciences? I've looked at various lists of "recommended" careers for ISTJs, but they're all pretty narrow.

So - for those of you ISTJ's who enjoy your careers: what do you do?

Are there any ISTJ SLPs out there who enjoy their job?
I'm currently a law student. I've never really enjoyed being a student, though. I can't wait to get out of school and begin working, gain some real hands-on experience in the field.
When I pass the bar, depending on how well I did I'd get to be a district court judge, a district attorney, or a private lawyer. Personally, I'm interested in public prosecution and the police. It's always been my dream to keep the streets safe and work for the public good. I know I'll be happy in my future job.

Temperament resources say that as ISTJs, we've got what it takes to be good at what we do. It's likely that if you continue to pursue your career, you'd make a kick-ass pathologist. It also would mean that if you choose to follow a different direction, you'd do just as well in that new area of expertise, too. I think you're basically a capable person; in that case, you should follow your interest and your heart. We only live once, might as well spend that time doing what we like doing.

I think there's a lot of flexibility in pursuing careers in real life. One could take a completely different turn (my advisor used to be a physics major before he chose to take up law), or combine two professional fields together (I've seen engineers and doctors in lawschool planning to specialize in patent law or medical law). My opinion is that having more majors under your belt would work to your advantage, not against you. You'd be qualified to do more.
 

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My major is Human Resource Management. I chose it because I've worked at far too many jobs where the HR person ALWAYS takes management's side. While I realize that they must enforce company standards, at the same time employees are people too and there ARE times that they ar right. Both sides should get due diligence, and equitable justice. If that means the manager is right and the employee has to go, then so be it. Conversely, if the employee is right and the manager has to go? Bye-bye now.
 

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Hmmm, reading about the future public prosecutor and HR manager makes me feel less than noble! hahahaha :tongue:

I'm a computer programmer (mainframe) and for the most part I really do enjoy my job. Mostly I don't have to deal with people other than the team members I see every day, so I like that.

Also, the computer does EXACTLY what I tell it to do... :crazy:
 

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I've had many career titles under my belt and interestingly enough, I have yet to consider the ideal career...that perfect thing. Despite my dislike for the previous work environments..unorganized...unstructured...the lack of personal benefits, I truly enjoyed the experience gained as a result.

For whatever it's worth... when seeking a career, follow your passion but first choose wisely. :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the replies and insight!

...follow your passion but first choose wisely...
That's kind of my problem at this point - an experience with a not-so-nice supervisor recently has stifled whatever passion I had left after a year of grad school so that eliminates that consideration. I'm considering following my passion in organization and getting a second post-grad degree in Library Sciences, but I feel like I should finish school and start contributing to society before I turn 30. :tongue:
 

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I'm considering following my passion in organization and getting a second post-grad degree in Library Sciences, but I feel like I should finish school and start contributing to society before I turn 30. :tongue:
Nah. You owe it to yourself to do something you enjoy. In the long run, you'll contribute more to society if you're doing what you love. And in another 30 years, you don't want to regret not taking that extra step.

For what it's worth, I'm majoring in economics, international business and international trade. Eventually I'd like to work on developing a viable international monetary system - it may be a pipe dream, but I intend to take it as far as I can!
 

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I have a BA in Industrial Engineering.

The IE field is a little different than other engineering disciplines. It deals with process improvement, quality control, scheduling, production control, cost savings, etc. It's a very versatile degree and seems to fit me perfectly. I work as a material handling consultant for the auto and defense industries. I love my job, except for the fact that I'm forced to work hand in hand with rude, undermining, plant engineers that see me as a threat to their jobs, seemingly everywhere I go.
 

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Nah. You owe it to yourself to do something you enjoy. In the long run, you'll contribute more to society if you're doing what you love. And in another 30 years, you don't want to regret not taking that extra step.

For what it's worth, I'm majoring in economics, international business and international trade. Eventually I'd like to work on developing a viable international monetary system - it may be a pipe dream, but I intend to take it as far as I can!

FWIW, I found out my second year of school that I actually enjoyed Economics. If the HR thing doesn't pan out, I'm strongly inclined to doing some more studying in that subject.
 

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Thanks for all the replies and insight!



That's kind of my problem at this point - an experience with a not-so-nice supervisor recently has stifled whatever passion I had left after a year of grad school so that eliminates that consideration. I'm considering following my passion in organization and getting a second post-grad degree in Library Sciences, but I feel like I should finish school and start contributing to society before I turn 30. :tongue:
AmyJay... if that is truly your desire, by all means just do it. We only live once...I think..? However...history can attest to the level of great contributions made to society by person well over the age of 50 years, so in this light...I think you can still gain a great education and still change the world. If you so choose.
 

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^ This. Even though I'm way past 30, I've still got half my life to do things, and the good part is that I won't spend half of that half dependent on someone else (i.e., in childhood).
 
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