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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I need some cold shower and hope you can provide it.

I can say objectively that I'm quite smart, have been told so plenty of times, won plenty of awards and similar. I'm well-educated.

At the same time I've been experiencing some awful work problems.

My first job after graduating was a nightmare. I, a super effective and efficient person, started to work in a hipstery NGO, in which quality was the last important thing. The boss was an idiot, who saw himself as a kind of guru for everybody to admire. Every doubt was punished. It was like a sect. I quit after just a few months and decided to move into business.

The first job in business was difficult because I was horribly underpaid for the 60 h/ week I was doing. Also these were mainly silly tasks and I didn't learn much. I was really suffering there, but I managed to stay two years. During the last year there I looked for a new role very intensively. It took me a year to find something. During my stay there I got excellent performance reviews but I hated this job.

Now I started a new job. The problem is it's a bit like the first job. The irrational boss, who is always right. His pet, who stares into his eyes telling him how cool he is - the boss does everything the pet says, the rest of the team is excluded from information. He changes his decisions constantly and forgets he said something totally different before. He micromanages to the degree I'd never experienced before (he spent an hour explaining me how to take notes, I'm not kidding you) and who, I think, feels threatened by me, because when I was praised by our higher management he started to exclude me from all communication making my work super difficult.

He is an illogical, ignorant idiot. He will tell me one thing at 9:00 am and then a very different one at 10:00 am if his pet tells him what he said at 9:00 am was not advantageous to her.

The work of the team is super inefficient.

I'm considering quitting again, the levels of stress are so high.

Could you please tell me that all these things are normal and I should develop a thicker skin and that life is not a fairytale? I'm not naive enough to think I have just bad luck every time but I feel so horribly unhappy in my professional life I can hardly describe it.
 

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i don't think they're normal in my profession. i've been working a long time and i can think of two places out of all the contracts i've done where i was actively wall-to-wall miserable the entire time i was there. and one where i wasn't miserable but i was about as uncomfortable as a cat having its temperature taken the entire time.

that's not many out of the whole list, actually. i'm 52 and have worked mostly as a freelance for the past 20-ish years. my profession (qa) is also technically a little adversarial just by definition, too.

it's hard to say this because for all i know you have run into three impossible situations in a row (they do exist). but to be brutally honest, my own cold shower is this: i think you're focusing on the wrong things. these are things you're not able to change, and that are also arguably none of your business to a large extent.

so caring who's in whose pocket, who is an idiot, and who is best buddies with who else is pointless. that will only make you nuts and complicate your life more and more. all i can tell you for truly bad workplace fits is this: 'if you want/need the job, or you can't afford to quit for whatever other reason, then block the politics as much as you can and concentrate on the work'. your post seems to have been all about the politics in all three places so far, you know?
 

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these are things you're not able to change, and that are also arguably none of your business to a large extent.

so caring who's in whose pocket, who is an idiot, and who is best buddies with who else is pointless. that will only make you nuts and complicate your life more and more. all i can tell you for truly bad workplace fits is this: 'if you want/need the job, or you can't afford to quit for whatever other reason, then block the politics as much as you can and concentrate on the work'. your post seems to have been all about the politics in all three places so far, you know?
These things are unfortunately my business because they make my work difficult or impossible at times. If we were a 10+ person group it wouldn't play a big role for me that a boss has a best buddy. But imagine that you work in a group of 4 and that the buddy blocks your access to information ("no, you can't attend the meeting"). If you don't know what happened in the meeting this will impact on your performance - you won't have an opportunity to ask plenty of important questions. And yes, my strategy is now just to say to my boss "this will impact on what I know and how quickly and well I can perform" and try to move forward, but 1) he hates it, 2) this means the politics has to do with me although I don't want to have to do with it.

Also, if a person above you is an idiot that does impact on you. You get ridiculous tasks. Your arguments are misinterpreted. You have to explain other people that what your boss did wasn't your idea or shut up and be seen as an idiot yourself. You're treated like an idiot by external people, who comment about your unit.
 

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This does sound pretty nightmarish. I've always pursued positions where I can work solo because I really don't like being on a team or dealing with other people's issues. I understand that's something that many well-adjusted people learn how to do in the workforce, but I didn't have to learn. So, while I don't have any advice for you, I can certainly understand why you'd be frustrated in a situation like this. Hopefully after a little more time you'll figure out what works for you and everything else will level out.

When you are interacting with your boss, make certain that he understands that you want to do the tasks he gives you, but that you need clarity seeing how it fits together with the ultimate goal. That's all I got.
 
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And yes, my strategy is now just to say to my boss "this will impact on what I know and how quickly and well I can perform" and try to move forward, but 1) he hates it, 2) this means the politics has to do with me although I don't want to have to do with it.
1. is terrific 2. is a pain in the butt but sometimes dissipates a little if you just fail to give it outwardly-visible attention and refuse to engage with it. it's extremely hard work. if you continue to find it intolerable and you have a cool enough head (plus paper trail) one option is to approach the human resources people, if there are any. constructive dismissal is a thing, or at least it is to lawyers around here.

or, if not in-house then to talk to external people who can give you actual information about how to proceed and how to cover your own butt on the legal/regulatory/whatever front. i'm not normally this much of an asshole myself but the bottom line is: being an 'idiot' is not actionable. it's also not goign to get you a lot of buy-in from potential allies because true or not it comes across as whiny playground name-calling.

Also, if a person above you is an idiot that does impact on you. You get ridiculous tasks. Your arguments are misinterpreted. You have to explain other people that what your boss did wasn't your idea or shut up and be seen as an idiot yourself. You're treated like an idiot by external people, who comment about your unit.
oh sure. and i really have been there myself - as a freelance which means no other recourse than to walk out. i'm just saying: unfortunately the impact works against you. so my personal efforts went towards blocking as much of it as i could and just concentrating on the work. ymmv but in my most recent case that eventually paid off DESPITE the bullshit. i made friends. i formed respectul collaborations with other people. i gained credibility inch by inch on my own. whether it was worth it or not is kind of a personal judgement call and it wouldn't necessarily be applicable for you.

i'm sure not going to argue that it's not outrageous for anyone to have to do that; it is. what i am saying is: outrageous or not, this is the deal that you've got. it's the situation you're in. so either you want to keep this job or you want to move out. if you want to keep the job then these are probably part of the terms of engagement.
 
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Hi lilysocks,

I know, it's part of the terms and I'm seriously planning to start searching for a new job on the weekend.

I had difficult bosses before (the 2. job described above was a kind of consulting, so I worked with plenty of managers on different projects), the differences are: 1) they were simply smarter; they understood the meaning of data analysis before taking decisions, were able to understand verbal and written messages and human behavior much better than the current boss 2) they weren't micromanaging. If the boss is an idiot but doesn't want to steer every small detail I'm doing I could avoid him and he would be happy with my results. I had this situation before. But if he's an idiot and he wants to tell me how to take my notes, etc. it's difficult to avoid him.

I have managed to gather a lot of good opinions from the people in my current job already, so it's not like I don't get along with anybody. Actually I get along perfectly with everybody but those 2 people in my team.

But how can it happen twice that I find myself in a similar situation? I'm afraid my resume will look simply awful because of that.
 

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But how can it happen twice that I find myself in a similar situation? I'm afraid my resume will look simply awful because of that.
yeah; so that's the factor. reason why i didn't feel like walking was an option myself the last time i found myself in a completely unreasonable situation.

so i'm just being strategic with this. it's about working out how to get what you CAN out of the situation, so as to be able to say later on that you achieved this or that or accomplished blah blah . . . just basically break at least even for your own requirements on this current job, instead of letting it push you deeper into some kind of work-trajectory hole.

i'll hand out disclosure about the source here: i hung in for almost the full duration of my contract and i did turn huge chunks of it around, so in a perverse sort of way that's one of the manymany contracts on my resume that i'm proudest of. it was definitely an incredibly difficult one. i'd never go back there, ever, short of living out of a refrigerator box beside a dumpster. but i did good stuff there. i was just updating my own resume this weekend, and at a distance of two years or however long it's been now, it's that stuff that remains in my mind. not captain scudge or medusa or the baby boiler; just the fact that "hey gee, look at this. i did actual, good stuff that i'm satisfied with while i was there".

scudge and the baby boiler still make good stories :tongue:. and medusa is still some kind of case history. but my point is: when the job's over, they're not the people who appear in my resume. i am, and i actually feel like i did pretty well.

yet with all of that under the belt i ended up bailing two weeks from completion anyway. for reasons, whatever that's worth. but people interviewing you for the next job don't want to hear reasons, so i have one person in my history who told me to my face i would not 'get' a reference 'out of' her once i quit. otoh, being supine was the price of a reference and the price had just gotten too high so i guess to me it was a loss by that point anyway. so it's tricky for sure.

so my high-level strategic thoughts from my own time in the war zone could be summarized something like this.

1. check yourself FREQUENTLY to make sure you're not turning yourself into part of the problem. it takes multi-checking because the impetus is so unusual and so strong.
2. remind yourself multi times per day what YOU want to get out of this. if that's what it takes to get you through one more day when your toes are already over the ledge. what i wanted to get out of mine was brutal and simple: remain able to pay my own bills, do what i objectively think is applicable to filling the role i signed on to fill, and not quit. this ain't a time for life-scaled goals; it's war-zone thinking.

3. do everything reasonable not to make it hard for people to tell you whatever they need you to know. this was a huge one for me and it would not normally seem right to me. but like i said: my prime directives for that specific duration were: pay the bills, remain employed until ready/able to leave on my own terms, and have something to show for it. scoring defensiveness points over any of them wasn't resume-worthy; i tried to minimize everything that was not.

4. get the benefit of any tiny little thing you can appreciate about being there. like for instance those other relationships.

5. try not to let them see you sweat. perhaps you do sweat, but don't let them SEE you do it. sweating is not professional and acting professional gives them fewer angles to downgrade you from . . . plus professionalism is not a resume point in itself, but that's for the even-stronger reason that it's the default. so you can't afford it. i kept telling myself that as well.

i am sympathetic, btw. just that i'm being sympathetic from a very cold-blooded slit-eyed strategic kind of level, rather than the gee-that-sucks one.



i basically placed my own self under martial law. and i want to reiterate that this was the choice that i made. i wanted to get something out of the job. i wanted to contribute something while i was there. i wanted to leave on my own two feet if i could. so martial law kept me in a situation every fibre of me wanted to get away from, pretty much every second of every minute i was on the wrong side of those doors.
 

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Take or leave my comments as you wish.

If it was me in this position, I'd try to figure out how the boss thinks, what motivates him, and then do my best to communicate in his language. For example, what would motivate him to spend an hour telling you how to take notes? "I have no idea - he's an idiot" is not a helpful answer here, some other ideas are he saw your note-taking and didn't think they would be acceptable, he wants you to be able to take notes in meetings that he can read later, ect.

While I work in a good company, we often have unreasonable clients that we have to try to keep happy so they will continue to give us work. And while the high-level managers of the clients are great people, some of the people we actually work with have unreasonable demands, are horrible at communicating but say "I've explained exactly what I want clearly" and often micromanage. I can't tell stories but some of the situations are ridiculous and frustrating. What's helped is understanding what motivates these people - mainly trying to satisfy/impress their superiors, or attempting to meet certain objectives without clearly defining them first.

My suggestion is to just try to keep your boss happy and if he's inefficient, wasteful, ect, that's his problem. Your task can just be to follow orders and know you're getting paid for his conflicting demands.

Basically knowing when to apply the "Not my problem" mindset.
 

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Navigating office politics is part of any job. If you freelance, you need to navigate around clients. luemb has given good advice. It’s a skill like any other. Learn what you can and practice working around difficult bosses. Ask non-accusatory questions: “Hey, I missed that meeting. Can you catch me up on XYZ? I think that impacts this assignment you gave me.”

It’s not always fun but job-hopping too often can make you unhireable.
 

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Thanks but I think there's some misunderstanding here. As I wrote above I actually worked with plenty of clients before. I loved working with clients and never had such problems with clients.

Also I'm not entry-level for several years now, proved myself already and it's difficult for me to accept someone spends an hour explaining me how to take notes. Not to mention that I was promised tasks in a specific area before I accepted my current position. It was actually the reason why I changed my job. Now I get 0 tasks in this specific area.

Everyone at my company is criticizing my boss at every possible occasion. I mean senior people whom I meet 1:1 as I need information from them. And yes, I mean serious, fact-based criticism, not bullying or "I don't like him". Honestly, I'm trying to steer away from that, but it's not easy as I share their opinion and the very same thing they criticize him for is why I'm currently applying for new jobs.

And yes, politics is to be found in every job, but I'm actually okish in dealing with it - I got several performance reviews from my last job stressing I'm very good in building business relationships even with difficult people. But there are things that are difficult for me to accept.
 

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Those things are not normal, though they're not uncommon. Having to deal with bad leaders is extremely frustrating, especially when people in the team follow. I have worked with both types and I can tell the difference and the impact on my performance and well-being are huge. Luckily for me, I can perform my job very independently and it is easy for me to withdraw. If everyone is criticizing your boss, they're probably comparing him with other bosses at your company and there you have your answer: it's not normal.
 

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Thanks but I think there's some misunderstanding here. As I wrote above I actually worked with plenty of clients before. I loved working with clients and never had such problems with clients.

Also I'm not entry-level for several years now, proved myself already and it's difficult for me to accept someone spends an hour explaining me how to take notes. Not to mention that I was promised tasks in a specific area before I accepted my current position. It was actually the reason why I changed my job. Now I get 0 tasks in this specific area.

Everyone at my company is criticizing my boss at every possible occasion. I mean senior people whom I meet 1:1 as I need information from them. And yes, I mean serious, fact-based criticism, not bullying or "I don't like him". Honestly, I'm trying to steer away from that, but it's not easy as I share their opinion and the very same thing they criticize him for is why I'm currently applying for new jobs.

And yes, politics is to be found in every job, but I'm actually okish in dealing with it - I got several performance reviews from my last job stressing I'm very good in building business relationships even with difficult people. But there are things that are difficult for me to accept.
Then there’s your answer. If your boss is not held in high esteem, then it’s just a matter of waiting for the inevitable. Do you have an opportunity to network with some of these people without directly undermining your boss? Build other relationships, wait for these senior people to let their opinions of your boss gel, and see what happens. How subtle can you be? The situation may soon resolve itself. Or you may have the chance for a lateral move.
 

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Then there’s your answer. If your boss is not held in high esteem, then it’s just a matter of waiting for the inevitable. Do you have an opportunity to network with some of these people without directly undermining your boss? Build other relationships, wait for these senior people to let their opinions of your boss gel, and see what happens. How subtle can you be? The situation may soon resolve itself. Or you may have the chance for a lateral move.
I'm frequently uneasy to what extent I should admit to these people that there is a problem and to what extent I should always show loyalty to my boss.

Examples:

1. One senior manager tells me: "How can you be responsible for part B of the project if you didn't have any influence on the decisions taken in part A? That's definitely not how it should happen". What can I answer to a thing like that?

2. One senior leader invites me to visit him in another office. Such a visit would make it possible for me to get the leader's support for our one very important project which won't be implemented if we don't get enough political support (which is currently very probable). My boss decides I don't need to go, I can get all necessary info by email. Is it ok if talking to the senior leader I mention that I was looking forward to meeting him but unfortunately by boss didn't think it was necessary?

3. Several important people ask me to send them important information about our business strategy. I promise to send them the info as soon as possible. My boss is responsible for defining this strategy and it needs to be official info, I can't just prepare it myself. I ask him repeatedly to provide me that info, so that I can send it forward, together with the remaining info they requested. No reply. Now I will see the managers again and I'm sure they will be irritated I haven't sent the info - is it ok if I mention that I just didn't receive it from my boss despite reminders or will I sound unprofessional?
 

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I'm frequently uneasy to what extent I should admit to these people that there is a problem and to what extent I should always show loyalty to my boss.
So much depends on you, how authentic you can sound, your work culture, and even the broader culture in the country or part of the country you are in. There is also a difference between different industries. So these are tough for me to answer, and please keep all "Beware advice from random strangers on the internet" rules firmly in place. But here's what I might try; you have to think about whether something similar might work for you.

Examples:

1. One senior manager tells me: "How can you be responsible for part B of the project if you didn't have any influence on the decisions taken in part A? That's definitely not how it should happen". What can I answer to a thing like that?
I'd just be honest and say something like "I just try to do the best I can with the part that is under my own control." Don't address the "how it should happen" part as it can be a bit of a trap if word gets out of what you said.

2. One senior leader invites me to visit him in another office. Such a visit would make it possible for me to get the leader's support for our one very important project which won't be implemented if we don't get enough political support (which is currently very probable). My boss decides I don't need to go, I can get all necessary info by email. Is it ok if talking to the senior leader I mention that I was looking forward to meeting him but unfortunately by boss didn't think it was necessary?
I would definitely make it clear that the canceled meeting was not my idea, but you want to sound matter-of-fact or even humble about it. And it depends on the relative position of this senior person to your own boss. "I was looking forward to our meeting, but my boss couldn't fit it in my schedule. Do you think we can handle this through email, or is more action needed?" Something like that. That leaves it open for this other person to reach out to your boss directly if needs be and covers your own hide. And you've not disclosed your boss's motivations (which are open to interpretation) but simply stated the fact that he did not schedule the meeting.

3. Several important people ask me to send them important information about our business strategy. I promise to send them the info as soon as possible. My boss is responsible for defining this strategy and it needs to be official info, I can't just prepare it myself. I ask him repeatedly to provide me that info, so that I can send it forward, together with the remaining info they requested. No reply. Now I will see the managers again and I'm sure they will be irritated I haven't sent the info - is it ok if I mention that I just didn't receive it from my boss despite reminders or will I sound unprofessional?
It's how you say it as much as what you say. There is a fine line between apologetic and simpering, and you have to be able to say it in a way that sounds natural to you. Probably I would get together a rough outline of what I would have liked to say based on what I know of the strategy (depending on the sensitivity of your industry). I would proactively say something like "I have some ideas of where we want to head outlined. I'm waiting for Mr. Boss to give me his official position on this and I haven't heard back anything yet. Have you heard from him directly?' This allows for the possibility that there was a misunderstanding and your boss passed the information directly to these other people (even if you know that is not the case; ask don't tell). It lets them know that you have made efforts to get what you need and aren't passively waiting. It makes it known that you DO have ideas and some understanding of process. And it puts it in your boss's lap without accusing him of anything. "I haven't heard YET" makes it sound like you are hopeful he'll still respond and gives him some room to maneuver if he gets called out on it by the other departments.

Sure it all sounds manipulative and it is. I don't like those sorts of games myself. But you have to play the hand you are dealt and badmouthing your boss, even if others agree with you, will make you seem untrustworthy. No one wants an employee who they think might talk about them down the road. Bite your tongue, stick to verifiable facts with no hints of what you think your boss's motivations or relative skills are, and allow the other people to fill in your broad sketches with their own details.

If they are at all sensitive to the situation they will read between your lines.
 

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***Warning*** This post contains Jaded Cynicism that you will not find on LinkedIn Alert***

Politically, you should ALWAYS appear to be loyal to your boss, even when you hate them. Let me explain a bit better because I don't want you thinking I'm advocating for blind loyalty to dip-shits beneath your intelligence.
Whether or not s/he is an idiot/douchebag in your mind is not the point. This person holds the keys to your career at the company and can make it hell for you in a number of capacities, if they are the type of asshole to do so. This is a very painful thing to go through, I understand. I have quit companies and moved positions laterally because I couldn't stand the person I worked for directly. Emotional decisions probably, and now being older, I handle things differently. Politicking sucks if it is not natural for you, but it is still a useful skill to learn.
Corporate survival lesson number 1:
Keep your boss's boss off your boss's back.

And I will give you some ideas for how to handle the situations below because I encounter these as well.

1. One senior manager tells me: "How can you be responsible for part B of the project if you didn't have any influence on the decisions taken in part A? That's definitely not how it should happen". What can I answer to a thing like that?
Never blame. Take the blame because ultimately the blame belongs to upper management but these guys/gals don't see it that way, ever. You might feel inclined to tell the truth by saying "Well, yes I agree with you about there being a complete disconnection between the phases of this project but I wasn't privy to anything in the initial phase and was expected to turn chicken shit into chicken salad."
Instead, you can say things like "Well, I am still learning how to integrate phases of projects whilst having limited visibility into these different areas. I am truly sorry that I wasn't proactive enough to approach the team responsible for part A. Next time, I will do my best to keep abreast of what is going on there as it directly affects my responsibilities for part B. If I am able to advise in any capacity, I would appreciate the opportunity to do so." Sorry, I just puked in my mouth a bit. Writing that has made me physically ill.

2. One senior leader invites me to visit him in another office. Such a visit would make it possible for me to get the leader's support for our one very important project which won't be implemented if we don't get enough political support (which is currently very probable). My boss decides I don't need to go, I can get all necessary info by email. Is it ok if talking to the senior leader I mention that I was looking forward to meeting him but unfortunately by boss didn't think it was necessary?
NEGATIVE - DO NOT SAY ANYTHING YOUR BOSS SAID EVEN IF IT WAS THE TRUTH. Ok, exaggeration, but do not phrase it like that.
Your boss obviously doesn't want to you speaking to anyone above him for any number of reasons. Maybe he is on the shit list and is worried about you saying something that will fall back on to him and make him look worse than he already is. Maybe he wants to steal your contributions and make them his own, furthering his career. Maybe he wants to be the savior who goes to this senior leader and acquires the political support needed to move forward with your team's objectives. Maybe he just wants you doing something else with your time.
Whatever the reason, you cannot say to the SL that your boss is holding you back from the meeting. Instead, if the SL contacts you about a meeting, simply put it back on him by stating, "Thank you for the opportunity to meet with you. I understand you have a very busy schedule and a lot of responsibilities, and I don't want to take up valuable time if it is more efficient/productive to receive this information by email. If you deem an in person meeting necessary, then please advise and I will let (my boss) know as he may be interested in contributing to the discussion." You will remove yourself from the line of fire, should the SL insist you meet in person - i.e. it's his decision to meet, not yours. Give your boss an opportunity to attend as well because it's his decision to attend or not.
The spirit of Machiavelli will be proud of you :wink:

3. Several important people ask me to send them important information about our business strategy. I promise to send them the info as soon as possible. My boss is responsible for defining this strategy and it needs to be official info, I can't just prepare it myself. I ask him repeatedly to provide me that info, so that I can send it forward, together with the remaining info they requested. No reply. Now I will see the managers again and I'm sure they will be irritated I haven't sent the info - is it ok if I mention that I just didn't receive it from my boss despite reminders or will I sound unprofessional?
1. Never promise anything. Period. Especially if the information they seek is not within your immediate grasp. I face this every day and it is very frustrating. Not from my boss, though - he is good with stuff like that. It is mainly from another department that our team relies on for info. The people there are brutal when it comes to reporting requests we send in. We don't get support from the General Manager because the guy running this part is a golden child and can do no wrong.
In your case, this guy is obviously not doing his job, or he is tied up doing other things that are, in his opinion, more important than your multiple requests. You are going to have to finesse the request to your boss. State why it is urgent you receive this info (e.g. who is requesting from you). You can subtly imply consequences, but they may be lost on him.
If you run into those who requested, and they ask you about it, then graciously state that not all the information was compiled to your liking and you don't want to send them incomplete information. You are very sorry about the delay, but want them to have a complete picture of your strategy.

it's all a fucking game, really. There is so much rhetoric about out there about how to be empowered in the workplace, but the reality is, you have to learn how to survive being dropped into a pit of cobras. It won't be all bad, but one false move and a bite can be deadly if you don't play your cards right.
And always be looking for new opportunities outside of this place you're at. If you're as smart as you think, then there will be many other places out there for you to shine. And places where you don't have to be ruthless.

Sorry to have to say it like that. I wish I could be more positive, but it's not my nature.

Good luck!
 

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BTW, in the real world I would likely get frustrated enough to handle it all wrong and shoot myself in the foot. It's very easy to armchair quarterback from here, so if I sound like I think it's simple, trust me that I know it is not. But you need to protect your own career here.
 

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BTW, in the real world I would likely get frustrated enough to handle it all wrong and shoot myself in the foot. It's very easy to armchair quarterback from here, so if I sound like I think it's simple, trust me that I know it is not. But you need to protect your own career here.
Thanks. I'm afraid this will happen in my case too.

I'm thinking about asking my boss's boss whether it would be possible to move me to another team. The thing is: I see several job ads in our department but I don't see any I would be interested in.

BTW: The 3. example I listed above is about numbers. If it was something I can come up with I would just do. But the people expect from us reliable forecasts (and, given the context, I understand why they need the numbers). I can't present numbers I haven't received from my boss.
 

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Thanks. I'm afraid this will happen in my case too.

I'm thinking about asking my boss's boss whether it would be possible to move me to another team. The thing is: I see several job ads in our department but I don't see any I would be interested in.

BTW: The 3. example I listed above is about numbers. If it was something I can come up with I would just do. But the people expect from us reliable forecasts (and, given the context, I understand why they need the numbers). I can't present numbers I haven't received from my boss.
I think it’s reasonable to see if there’s someplace that will be a better fit. Before you speak to anyone, repeat to yourself twenty times: “Do not trash my boss. Do not trash my boss. Do not etc.”.

Positive language. Not the best fit, I think I can contribute more if, and so on.

I hope it all works out for you.
 
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