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Hello there! I am beginning college in a couple of weeks, and I am feeling many mixed emotions. I'm mainly excited, but I also know that, as an INFJ, my experience may be a little atypical from those of the other students. I'm really curious about the experiences that other INFJs have had in college, and the different ways of coping in such a distinct environment!

A few questions for all of you who have attended college:

1. What were the most positive experiences during your time as a student?
2. How did you find time to recharge? What certain activities helped you recharge the most? Were you able to balance being social with solitude? If so, how?
3. If you could do anything different, what would you do?
4. What subject areas/degrees interested you the most?
5. How do/did you learn best? I've been wondering this for a while; like, I'm not very good with visual study aids, and I have to learn the big picture before learning any of the details.
6. Any other tips, advice, etc.?

Sorry, this sounds so much like an interview! But I've really been curious for a while. I also feel so fortunate and grateful that I'm already aware of being an INFJ... I'm so young, and the knowledge has already helped me live with greater ease and become much more of a positive person than I think I would have been otherwise.

Thanks for your help!
 

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I have one year of university under my belt so hopefully I can help :)

1. What were the most positive experiences during your time as a student?
I guess making new friends, meeting new interesting people. Also learning new things that interest you, exploring the whole campus.

2. How did you find time to recharge? What certain activities helped you recharge the most? Were you able to balance being social with solitude? If so, how?
I'm a pretty weak Introvert so I can deal with being with people for a long time. I used to have small one-hour breaks and I would just go to the library and study. If not, sometimes I would hang out with a few close friends. Certain activities for recharging.. hmm I like to explore the campus! We have a nice beach and a garden so I would sometimes go there. I liked to go into random buildings just to observe the atmosphere haha. As for balancing out social vs solitude - most likely you'll be lonely (like everyone else starting college) because chances are, your friends have different schedules than you do and different breaks. So I don't think that's a problem - or, it wasn't one for me. I guess it comes down to how much your schedule matches with your friends.

3. If you could do anything different, what would you do?
I'm only on the second year so I can only say this for the first year - I would definitely try to be more social. In my case, all my friends were scattered across the country and in different faculties (if in the same university) so I was a loner. I went through a semi-depressed phase in term 1 because it was hard to adjust to the course load and I didn't have anyone to talk to. So yeah, I would definitely put myself out there more. It's hard to just be outgoing but it takes some practice.. I know I had a lot of awkward moments but hey, we all learn.

4. What subject areas/degrees interested you the most?
I loved English, Psychology and Biology in highschool. I also liked physics too (but not as much as the aforementioned). I want to work in health care so I'm studying biology at the moment mixed with some neuroscience (aka biopsychology) and genetics.

5. How do/did you learn best? I've been wondering this for a while; like, I'm not very good with visual study aids, and I have to learn the big picture before learning any of the details.
Hm, I learn best by forming study groups. I'm pretty shy but I went out on a limb, gathered some classmates and met up every week to go over math homework. It's less intimidating to ask a classmate awkward questions than a professor. Needless to say, my highest mark was math. Flashcards never worked for me. I like to do outlines - so i would make two-column notes with lots of diagrams and I outline the general concepts of each chapter. Really great for when finals come up. If you're not good with visual study aids, have you tried auditory learning? Like reading aloud the chapter? You could also simulate it. I tried it once (I used a plethora of pens to simulate meiosis in a cell). It sort of worked.

6. Any other tips, advice, etc.?
Er, never not study for the finals! I did that and bombed term 1. If you're overwhelmed, it's okay to take less courses and do an extra year - or drop any sort of extra curricular. I made myself go to at least one office hour a week and that really helped. If you want to make friends, join a club. If you want some quiet time, I'm sure your library has those no-speaking rooms (we have those and they look like rooms from Harry Potter haha). Most importantly enjoy your experience there. It's okay to feel overwhelmed because it's a new place with new people and a new system - everyone is feeling like that. You'll get used to it. Best of luck!! :laughing:
 

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Hello there! I am beginning college in a couple of weeks, and I am feeling many mixed emotions. I'm mainly excited, but I also know that, as an INFJ, my experience may be a little atypical from those of the other students. I'm really curious about the experiences that other INFJs have had in college, and the different ways of coping in such a distinct environment!

A few questions for all of you who have attended college:

1. What were the most positive experiences during your time as a student?
2. How did you find time to recharge? What certain activities helped you recharge the most? Were you able to balance being social with solitude? If so, how?
3. If you could do anything different, what would you do?
4. What subject areas/degrees interested you the most?
5. How do/did you learn best? I've been wondering this for a while; like, I'm not very good with visual study aids, and I have to learn the big picture before learning any of the details.
6. Any other tips, advice, etc.?

Sorry, this sounds so much like an interview! But I've really been curious for a while. I also feel so fortunate and grateful that I'm already aware of being an INFJ... I'm so young, and the knowledge has already helped me live with greater ease and become much more of a positive person than I think I would have been otherwise.

Thanks for your help!
Thanks for creating the thread! I too will be starting University in a couple of weeks so the answers people give will be useful :happy:
 

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hello :) in NZ most students don't live on campus, including me, but thought I'd still do my best to help.

1. What were the most positive experiences during your time as a student?
Being able to immerse myself in stuff I'm actually passionate about.

2. How did you find time to recharge? What certain activities helped you recharge the most? Were you able to balance being social with solitude? If so, how?
Probably not applicable.

3. If you could do anything different, what would you do?
I would have taken more time to chose friends that were better for me. Accidently got adopted by the 'cool kids' and I didn't have as much fun with them as the other groups. (Mostly because I didn't exactly have the same passions of getting drunk and clubbing)

4. What subject areas/degrees interested you the most?
Fine Arts, Counseling

5. How do/did you learn best? I've been wondering this for a while; like, I'm not very good with visual study aids, and I have to learn the big picture before learning any of the details.
I read through stuff quickly and highlight it, then discuss it with anyone I can. For me talking about it is the best way I learn something. So far my work has mostly been exhibition stuff though so I'm lucky in that aspect cause I'm rubbish with dates/names.

6. Any other tips, advice, etc.?
Relax, remember that everyone's nervous, be yourself, study hard. Cliche but true.
 
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Thanks for all the help so far!

5. How do/did you learn best? I've been wondering this for a while; like, I'm not very good with visual study aids, and I have to learn the big picture before learning any of the details.
Hm, I learn best by forming study groups. I'm pretty shy but I went out on a limb, gathered some classmates and met up every week to go over math homework. It's less intimidating to ask a classmate awkward questions than a professor. Needless to say, my highest mark was math. Flashcards never worked for me. I like to do outlines - so i would make two-column notes with lots of diagrams and I outline the general concepts of each chapter. Really great for when finals come up. If you're not good with visual study aids, have you tried auditory learning? Like reading aloud the chapter? You could also simulate it. I tried it once (I used a plethora of pens to simulate meiosis in a cell). It sort of worked.
Hmmm, my sister has talked about study groups helping her, and she's also an INFJ. So far I've been pretty apprehensive about them, just because I'm so shy and I like to reflect on things internally - but, maybe I should give them a try! And outlines are always great :)
 

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1. What were the most positive experiences during your time as a student?
I really enjoyed the cultural events my college offered. I could attend most plays and concerts for free. There was always something going on. I was exposed to lots of new things, which was awesome for someone as curious as me!

2. How did you find time to recharge? What certain activities helped you recharge the most? Were you able to balance being social with solitude? If so, how?
Actually, for me college was bit lonely at times. While I was able to meet lots of new people, some of whom were really interesting, we were all busy, so I didn't develop very many close friendships. However, when I did need down time, I could hang out in my dorm room or hide in the library. One of the cool things about college campuses are all the nooks and crannies you'll find. Check out places not directly on campus, too, like local cafes or bookshops. Sometimes the people I most enjoyed spending time with were the cashiers and librarians and other people who became part of my daily life in a very casual way.

3. If you could do anything different, what would you do?
Two things. First, I would have chosen a strong minor. Try to choose something that is quite different from your major, but compliments it. For instance, as an English major, web design would have been a wonderful pairing, as would a foreign language. Computer science stuff is always a plus in today's job market.

Second, start going to your school's career center as a junior. They'll show you how to find the jobs you're interested in, help you apply, and then hopefully you can land a job before or right after graduation. This will cut down on a tremendous amount of anxiety.

4. What subject areas/degrees interested you the most?

I majored in English, but I was also fascinated by psychology, sociology, anthropology, art, music, philosophy -- in short, the humanities. Don't freak out if you're interested in these areas but terrified you can't make money by studying them; creative humanities majors can make quite a bit if they start the job hunt early and are passionate about what they do.

5. How do/did you learn best? I've been wondering this for a while; like, I'm not very good with visual study aids, and I have to learn the big picture before learning any of the details.
I learn best by taking notes, then recopying them later. I love flash cards. Like you, I'm all about the big picture, so I tend to make outlines with big concepts to help me understand how they're all related.

Also, don't be shy about chatting with professors after class. By no means harass them; they're busy people! But if you can think of some good questions, it'll really make their day to talk to an enthused student about their life's work.

6. Any other tips, advice, etc.?
Stay open to new experiences and new people. Try new things -- especially those that scare you. Challenge yourself often and reward yourself when you meet those challenges. Create a balance between work and play. Start a savings account and save money each pay day, even if it's only $5-$10; at the end of four or five years, it will have added up to something. Be sure to get exercise almost daily, and get plenty of sleep. Oh, and eat something besides ramen.

I hope you have a really great college experience! :laughing:
 

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I went to the University of Virginia. (so whatever that means to you, blah, blah, blah)

First - don't forget to have fun! Our personality type is quite serious. Remember that college is your time to be social and enjoy life!

1. What were the most positive experiences during your time as a student?
several long college lectures, my roomates, library time, several old-fashioned frat parties, good friends, good food, good times!

2. How did you find time to recharge? What certain activities helped you recharge the most? Were you able to balance being social with solitude? If so, how? college by definition is a mix of solitude and socialness. study alone, work alone, *play* together

3. If you could do anything different, what would you do? nothing, i loved college, no regrets.

4. What subject areas/degrees interested you the most? i was a double major poli sci and philosophy

5. How do/did you learn best? I've been wondering this for a while; like, I'm not very good with visual study aids, and I have to learn the big picture before learning any of the details. im a visual learner! so im no help. but grab the thesis from each article - it helps. reread things, flashcards if necessary

6. Any other tips, advice, etc.? Good luck with everything! Have faith in yourself and everything will work out!
 

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1. What were the most positive experiences during your time as a student?
This is the first time I experienced independence for the first time and I loved it. I had more control over my life since I was living on-campus(something I recommend you to do). People are basically the same: shallow, conformist and materialistic but you gain a very different perspective on yourself and begin to prepare yourself as you enter adulthood. It's a very rewarding experience so enjoy it.

2. How did you find time to recharge? What certain activities helped you recharge the most? Were you able to balance being social with solitude? If so, how?
I stayed the same, I didn't change my introvert behavior at all and joined no activities whatsoever. I did however, go to internships such as Disney and resorts, so I got to go to different places. I did not have many friends and only talked to my roommate but I didn't care, after all, I'm not very eager to talk to others but hopefully you'll be different in this regard lol

3. If you could do anything different, what would you do?
Travel more. Probably once I start the slave servitude life I won't have time to travel since I would be too busy paying my student loans and sustaining myself. I don't regret much.

4. What subject areas/degrees interested you the most?
I liked learning foreign languages such as Japanese and Chinese. In addition, most of the philosophy, physics and psychology academia interested me as well. Basically, anything that required deep thought.

5. How do/did you learn best? I've been wondering this for a while; like, I'm not very good with visual study aids, and I have to learn the big picture before learning any of the details.
In your case it would be wise to rely on your syllabus a lot more and learn in advance what chapters you're going to cover in the next lecture, so that way you don't go empty-handed and more-or less know what the teacher is talking about. I'm good with visual learning but I need the aid of auditory speech as well so I can integrate all these concepts and ideas into my head.

6. Any other tips, advice, etc.?
Have fun, and don't sweat it. If you do everything you're supposed to do, you won't have a problem. Get involved in extra-curricular activities and network alot if you want to get into graduate school. Hope you have a blast!:laughing:
 

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1. What were the most positive experiences during your time as a student?
- Meeting intelligent people.
- Realizing my strengths and weaknesses.

2. How did you find time to recharge? What certain activities helped you recharge the most? Were you able to balance being social with solitude? If so, how?
-I choose library or the riverbank (my school is near a river) when I need time for myself.
-I usually tell my friends I'm going to the library when I need a break from socializing. In my freshman year I was pretty bad at balancing parties and solitude, but it got easier for me in later years.

3. If you could do anything different, what would you do?
-Choose a different major...the one I actually wanted.
-Be more extroverted.

4. What subject areas/degrees interested you the most?
-Science (Biology, Biochem.)
-Social sciences (Anthropology, Archaeology, Psychology)

5. How do/did you learn best? I've been wondering this for a while; like, I'm not very good with visual study aids, and I have to learn the big picture before learning any of the details.
-I go over the material by myself in the beginning, then I add additional notes from the lectures. I review my notes every other day.
-I rewrite stuff a lot.

6. Any other tips, advice, etc.?
- Just let things happen. Don't overthink. Have fun!!
 

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1. What were the most positive experiences during your time as a student? Aside from the learning experience, I gained a better understanding of people from different walks of life. I came from a very conservative private high school, so interacting with different types of people during university made me less judgmental and more open to new ideas.
2. How did you find time to recharge? What certain activities helped you recharge the most? Were you able to balance being social with solitude? If so, how? I usually hung out with a select group of friends. I think I balanced it quite well, sometimes I would go to the library and read a book if I needed to be alone.
3. If you could do anything different, what would you do? Secretly, I wanted to be more assertive, maybe friendlier and more involved in school activities, although I did quite well in my studies. But, I've realized lately that I'm just not that kind of person.
4. What subject areas/degrees interested you the most? I actually liked theology, and surprisingly I did well in logic, loved my painting subjects too.
5. How do/did you learn best? I've been wondering this for a while; like, I'm not very good with visual study aids, and I have to learn the big picture before learning any of the details. I'm a big picture learner too, I have to know how/where it fits before I can really understand it. But I was pretty good in guessing where we could go wrong, esp. in group projects of my art subjects.
6. Any other tips, advice, etc.? Take your studies seriously, but remember to have fun. :crazy:
 

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Alright! I've been through a year of college, but i believe i can explain some points here.

1.) My most positive experience when i came into college was the people. It was surprising for me, because they were rather kind and respectful of me as an individual. We're all in college for one specific purpose, and that is to learn.

2.) I personally commute back and forth and deal with traffic than deal with roommates and all that sort of drama because i'm aware that i wouldn't get along with anyone after a certain time-frame of being with them. But as a commuter the schedule routines are different, and therefore social interaction is much different. For me i find being at home in the evening for the night is refreshing, as there's quiet time and solitude. I do balance social-time fairly awkwardly, as i am generally not that social of a person. To me when i want to recharge and unwind i find a location that there's not a whole lot of people and just sit there on campus.

3.) Probably spend more time with friends, and at the school. Try to be more time-management-focused.

4.) I'm going into Architectural Design because i like the whole ordeal of designing something. I was interested in Mechanical Engineering for a while, and i've recently been side hopping Psychology as a hobby rather than a profession. Architecture is actually a very challenging field for me as i'm force to speak how i go about my designs and why i design them a certain way... in front of people. It's hard, but i love slaving over designing in the background... i hate the fact i have to sell myself... because i cannot do that due to my personal nature as a shy reserved introverted quiet girl.

5.) I learn best when i have a crazy insane professor with an awesome sense of humor. I learn through writing notes, looking things up on my own (rather time consuming) or actively doing it. Visual aids help me in some way, but i'm rather hands on, and i learn better when i get to be interactive in the learning process.

6.) If you're living on campus; literally talk to your roommate(s) if you have problems with them. I stayed overnight one night on my campus and i had to set the fact that i need sleep on the table in front of my host-mate because she's an all-night kind of person. If you have a lot of morals and rules in your life, explain it to your roommate(s) and don't be scared to stomp your foot down to defend your morals and rules.

Also study. It's valuable to do so ~ as professors tend to not care (unless their job is on the line, or the entire class is failing). Study what you can, and just a little more than that. Set aside time for homework when you're at your best and when you're most alert and not distracted (mine is in the morning (sadly before everything is due)). Don't procrastinate too much.... it'll save you from a load of stress. Once you settle into routine of college things become much more easier.

Eat healthy. For real. It'll help you in the long run by eating an apple instead of a box of pizza at 3:00am.

Have fun though, join activities, start game nights (apples to apples, candyland, board games...), attend parties if you that kind of person (i'm not, so... o.o), plan things. College is about being able to balance work & social so then when you're out in the 9to5er world you'll still be able to be a social kind of person, yet hold a job and be successful at that combination.

---

From my own experience i went through what people call 'culture shock' or 'transition shock'. Basically the inability to adapt to the changed environment quickly, and rather had to go through a long process of acceptance (still am). Of course everyone experiences college differently ~ I wouldn't stress about it so much, and i believe you'll do fine.
 

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1. What were the most positive experiences during your time as a student?
Getting to know like minded artists and professors and increasing my knowledge of art and other subjects.
2. How did you find time to recharge? What certain activities helped you recharge the most? Were you able to balance being social with solitude? If so, how?
I spent a lot of time in the library or computer lab.
3. If you could do anything different, what would you do?
Minor or double major in something that was more likely to land me a job, such as graphic design or business.
4. What subject areas/degrees interested you the most?
All kinds of art, psychology, sociology, and foreign language
5. How do/did you learn best? I've been wondering this for a while; like, I'm not very good with visual study aids, and I have to learn the big picture before learning any of the details.
I tried to take more than one class with the same teacher, which made it easier for me to talk to them when I wasn't sure about my work. I definitely preferred hands on experience.
6. Any other tips, advice, etc.?
Try to form solid friendships that expand outside the classroom and assignments.
 

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1. What were the most positive experiences during your time as a student?
Interesting clubs. If you have a passion, there is a club for it... don't be shy... get involved. It might take a little push but it's worth it. You'll meet like-minded people (Essential for an INFJ's college romance :tongue:). My favorite club was the Jiujitsu club. I met a lot of friends and spent a lot of good time there.

There are lots of activities on campus... keep your ear to the ground. It's worth it. I made friends with a girl who knew literally everyone on campus... it's how I met most of my friends.

2. How did you find time to recharge? What certain activities helped you recharge the most? Were you able to balance being social with solitude? If so, how?
Okay, well first I wanna say that dorm life can be a pain. The extroverts on your floor will find out your name and you gotta say hi a few times every day... even a "whatsup" here and there. :blushing:

When ur a freshman, all the little socialites from high school will try to "re-construct" the social order from high school and find out the social hierarchy. It's kinda fun to watch... but annoying if they expect you to participate.

Having a roomie who knows how to shut up is very important for getting work done and maintaining sanity. (ESTP roomies = bad choice).

How do I recharge... sound cancelling headphones, pandora, find the quietest dining common and find a dimly lit corner where you can refill hot chocolate for yourself and chill. Find some quiet, friendly people to befriend who won't yak your brain to pieces. Do that and your Introversion will remain healthy. :tongue:

3. If you could do anything different, what would you do?
I would have hooked up with Julie...

Too personal? Uh well... I would have probably chosen different classes, figured out my major earlier, procrastinated less....

4. What subject areas/degrees interested you the most?
Take your pick of a humanity. Anthro, Polisci, History, Psych, Philosophy, there are so many fascinating fields.

5. How do/did you learn best? I've been wondering this for a while; like, I'm not very good with visual study aids, and I have to learn the big picture before learning any of the details.
Yeah go to class, ask questions (Most professors encourage it), learn all the background details so you can see the bigger picture. Talk to the professor too... they love it. (and you get better grades, lol :shocked:). You want to balance the classes you need to take with classes you know you'll get good grades on to cushion your GPA.
 
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