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I'm approaching my senior year of high school this year. I've applied and been accepted into a dual enrollment program my junior year. ( It's where I attend college and high school at the same time.) The problem is the fact that if I don't pass my two classes, English and Humanities, in college with a C or higher I cannot be reimbursed for my classes and I'll have to pay for them.

I also can't complete the 2nd semester of my two classes if I don't get a college ready score on the math sections of either the SAT or ACT before the second semester of classes start. I'm definitely not good in math, how can I get better at it by the time the SAT comes out?

Now, I have another amount of pressure in my high school where I have to complete three other classes I don't really need but have to take regardless in order for my college applications to look good. How will this and the work from college all add up to my workload?

I don't know what I want to major in college yet, frankly, I haven't even found a career that sounds interesting enough for me. There are some possibilities but I don't know if I could do them. Art is one. But it's not a stable career choice. Being a teacher? A counselor? Psychology? Maybe, but it's a lot of stress that I don't know if I can handle. What?

My counselor asked me the day we were setting up schedules for this year, what were my plans after high school. I drew a blank, I stumbled over my thoughts, and spat out whatever major was in my mind. I was uncertain and I am still uncertain about what I want to major in, I don't know why it's so hard for me to choose a major. I'm lost as to what career field to choose but I know that I want to go to college.

I know school hasn't started yet and I was already excited/nervous about dual enrollment during my junior year of high school. I wanted to finally go to college and be with more mature people in a less crowded place than staying with idiotically senseless teenagers in an overcrowded school. But now I feel like I regret this decision I made (Just like when I decided to get out of early college because I thought I couldn't handle it. A stupid, careless, completely regrettable decision made by an idiotic mind.) because I fear that I may not pass these classes with an acceptable grade and my parents will have to pay out of pocket for my inadequacy.

My parents want me to get out of dual enrollment and finish high school then go to college that way I can figure out what I want to be by then. But I fear that it's too late to do that and it would cause a massive hindrance as well as a grave annoyance to my guidance counselor after all the time and effort she put into doing those applications for me.

Honestly, I'm frightened, lost, and don't know what to do. Will this be very hard? Can I handle it? When will I figure out what I want to major in? Maybe I need to sort out some choices on paper and figure out which sounds the best for me... I really hope I can pass my college classes well because I have to now.

I'm really sorry for this long post.
:sad:
 

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I also can't complete the 2nd semester of my two classes if I don't get a college ready score on the math sections of either the SAT or ACT before the second semester of classes start. I'm definitely not good in math, how can I get better at it by the time the SAT comes out?
Have you tried different approaches when it comes to learning Math? For example, are you an auditory learner that would rather hear the words than see the words? Are you a Kinesthetic learner that has to experience things rather than read about it or hear it? I'd suggest considering different ways to wrap your head around Math.

Now, I have another amount of pressure in my high school where I have to complete three other classes I don't really need but have to take regardless in order for my college applications to look good. How will this and the work from college all add up to my workload?
That is a good question that will likely be answered as you go through your semester and find a way to overcome the challenge. It is a lot to take though you may find a solution somewhere.

I don't know what I want to major in college yet, frankly, I haven't even found a career that sounds interesting enough for me. There are some possibilities but I don't know if I could do them. Art is one. But it's not a stable career choice. Being a teacher? A counselor? Psychology? Maybe, but it's a lot of stress that I don't know if I can handle. What?

How about you just study what you find interesting, develop some skills and then proceed into the job market? I know in my own experience that what I'm doing now wasn't quite considered a career when I was in school. When I started university in 1993, the Web was all of 2 years old and wasn't really being harnessed yet at all. I graduated in 1997 and have worked in web development of one form or another ever since that point in time. My point is that your job title may well not even exist yet.

Honestly, I'm frightened, lost, and don't know what to do. Will this be very hard? Can I handle it? When will I figure out what I want to major in? Maybe I need to sort out some choices on paper and figure out which sounds the best for me... I really hope I can pass my college classes well because I have to now.
It could well be hard but then if you have the character, you'll get through it. You'll find some way to handle it as the story of life will be written one way or another here. Who says that you only get one chance at university and can't change your mind after having that decision? I'm not and would love to know who believes such BS. Some people here are starting to go to university for a degree and then go to college to get specific skills upgraded so that they can work in a field that wants both a degree and some relevant experience with something where colleges are better at helping people get some skills.

The college classes are a gift. Think of it as a way to test-drive whether or not college is for you. While lots of people advocate going to college there are more than a few folks that have done quite well without college, though they did tend to have a drive in other fields that helped cement that.
 
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