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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to be finishing up my associates soon.
I'll then go for a bachelor's.

The university I want to transfer to has just adopted a philosophy major.
Philosophy is my largest passion in life. I enjoy ideas , thoughts, and thinking.
If I do this, I know that I'll grow tremendously in my mental ability (which is my highest aim).
I want to be able to think exceptionally well. I would think the training would allow me the skills.

Yet, philosophy is only great for law students. There are no law schools nearby.
Plus, I'm introvert and wouldn't enjoy the extraverted aspect of law anyway.
Other than that, philosophy is very difficult to do anything with.

Thus, I was thinking of just going into Psychology, as the university already has a great BA program.
With psychology, I'll learn a somewhat credible social science, learn to independently research, and actually have some reasonable prospects after graduation. Yet, it's not what I want to do.

Thus, I am stuck. Should I major in psychology and minor in philosophy (and then perhaps major in philosophy at some other point down the road). Or, should I just major in philosophy, take my chances, and then study psychology at some other point further down the road?

Any and all advice is welcome.
 

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Given the choices of either Psychology or Philosophy, I would say major in Psych. and minor in Philo... or perhaps you could shoot for a double major. Like stated in your post, you can come back and get a degree in which ever you choose to minor in. So, from an economic standpoint: go with what will make you more money, so you can afford to come back and learn the other. Minoring in it doesn't mean you can't study it in your off time too.

That's what I think anyways. :proud:
 

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I am a thinker and I'm a biology major, sports medicine minor, and going for my Master's in Business Administration. I have a love hate relationship with philosophy, because if I don't agree with it, I get angry about having to learn about it and regurgitate their indoctrination... But that's me. Psych is an easy major and you can do just about anything with it. What do you ultimately want to do?
 

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Psych would be way more practical. Philosophy....well, there's not much you can do with a degree in philosophy aside from law and teaching. I don't know how you feel about teaching.

If you love philosophy, just study it on your own. Join or start a philosophy club or find some buddies on here to discuss stuff with and you could learn more than you would in a class room setting. You don't really need classes to learn. Generally the only exception to that is science because of the lab sessions.

Its good to do what you love, but you still have to make a living. You might love philosophy, but if the only jobs available for philosophers are jobs you wouldn't enjoy, then its not going to get you any further than majoring in a subject you don't like at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Given the choices of either Psychology or Philosophy, I would say major in Psych. and minor in Philo... or perhaps you could shoot for a double major. Like stated in your post, you can come back and get a degree in which ever you choose to minor in. So, from an economic standpoint: go with what will make you more money, so you can afford to come back and learn the other. Minoring in it doesn't mean you can't study it in your off time too.

That's what I think anyways. :proud:
Thanks for the advice. I am thinking of a double major, just not sure if it's really possible, lol.
But very well said advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
KR: I'm not sure.

Psych would be way more practical. Philosophy....well, there's not much you can do with a degree in philosophy aside from law and teaching. I don't know how you feel about teaching.

If you love philosophy, just study it on your own. Join or start a philosophy club or find some buddies on here to discuss stuff with and you could learn more than you would in a class room setting. You don't really need classes to learn. Generally the only exception to that is science because of the lab sessions.

Its good to do what you love, but you still have to make a living. You might love philosophy, but if the only jobs available for philosophers are jobs you wouldn't enjoy, then its not going to get you any further than majoring in a subject you don't like at all.
I often think of being a professor; it would be ideal. Although, I'm highly introverted and possibly wouldn't feel comfortable with the social aspects of teaching, but I really don't know if that's something that would prevent me from doing such a job. Mostly, I think becoming a professor is highly unlikely.

So, perhaps I should just go with a psych major. Philosophy may only allow me the room to get a job doing something I really won't enjoy. Plus, I am thinking of just learning philosophy in my spare time. Thanks.
 

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My humble suggestion (from a kinda dumb smart guy who wishes he could've done this himself):

major in philosophy, get a 4.0 GPA from it, and then spend your free time making something, starting a business, creating a nonprofit/charity, inventing cool shit, writing and publishing a book, filming an independent movie, etc.

my friends are in 1 of 4 categories right now: grad school, working for their dad, employed but pay sucks, or unemployed and looking/depressed. i am in category 4.

then, there are a few kids i know who are in a mysterious category 5. these kids earned jobs they love through the side projects and hobbies they started in school. several are my age (24) and run their own companies now because they were busy creating computer programs during college. one is a published author who writes under a pseudonym.

NTs come up with some fantastic ideas. It'd be a shame if you graduated and ended up where I am now having majored in something you didn't really like and not getting any jobs anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah, were I to actually apply my mind, I'm sure I could be useful somewhere.
And I wouldn't like to end up in category 4.

And considering I'm am financial secure for a few more decades (as far as I know... don't ask), I probably could just major in philosophy and spend my time attempting one of those side projects. But, it's definitely something to think about.
 

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Introverts can make excellent professors, and the social aspects get a lot easier with age and experience. I'd say go with what you love. If it is your passion, you will excel.
 

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Robinson's idea sounds like what I'd go with at this point. People forget college is as much about discovering yourself and meeting new people as it is about getting that piece of paper that says you are a success (imo)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Introverts can make excellent professors, and the social aspects get a lot easier with age and experience. I'd say go with what you love. If it is your passion, you will excel.
Wise words. People who prepare students for a life of college often say, "Don't chase dreams of wealth; do what you are going to enjoy." The reason is that most end up changing their minds 1000000 times before finding something they like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Good news. I've realized I can get a philosophy BA, do a few extra psychology courses on the side and then attend Graduate school for Psychology. So, I can basically study both and still end up with a practical degree. =]
 
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