Personality Cafe banner
1 - 20 of 75 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Currently employed to manage a small automotive repair shop.
Recently moved into a significantly larger location and still going through the setting up growing pains of that.
However the business prior to my joining it had a reputation for amazing work but horrifically bad scheduling, customer communication, and failure to meet expected deadlines. From reading over the MB types I suspect he is a INFP, but I have not confirmed that as of yet.

The core issue I am dealing with is a serious communication lack between the owner/top mechanic and myself which is making it very difficult to accomplish basic time organization let alone improve the poor reputation. I understand that the guy was use to working alone for many years and also has serious issues with control, but I am finding it borderline unbearable to work here given the current state of operational flow.

Currently I have to chase him around to get status updates for customers on existing projects, rarely does he organically supply me with updates.

He makes himself inaccessible to me multiple times a day. Locking himself in his office and refusing to respond to chat messages or inter office pages.

When I ask for timelines for overdue projects I get given either snide remarks (am i working on it right now? nope) or vague (Soon). I also often find him doing non revenue generating behavior(fixing personal cars, a go-kart project) which just fuels my rage when I am given an excuse for why we continue to slip further behind schedule on numerous projects.

To make matters worse when I ask for tools to help the business; A real CRM, electricity in our waiting room (lights work wall sockets don't, have a extension cord running across from another room), access to estimating and parts pricing tools, I get given lip-service or the excuse that we have no money. However when I try to do things that will improve the ROI I get heavy opposition or even active blocking of improvements.

Some days are better then others and the potential for this business to be crazy profitable is there if I can unlock how to get this guy to focus on the correct task of the moment and improve productivity. The only thing I have noticed is that when confronted he does work well for a short period of time but there does seem to be a sort of payback as I will find passive aggressive examples (used to have access to XYZ, will come in monday to a lock/PW changed) of him preventing me from being able to use that method again.

Hopefully PerC has some ideas because it is almost to the point where I need to look for another employment option as at the moment the check sure isn't worth the bullshit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,931 Posts
1) CRM: Insightly.com (can be) free, have a subordinate enter the customer data for you. Makes for great busy work; have a subordinate handle your sales calls and document each call in Insightly. Also has a mobile app so you can access it wherever and the INFP can, too.

2) Google Calendar for scheduling.

3) tap into his intuition- draft a hypothetical revenue projection calculated for each element you seek to change. Give him an ultimatum: get you what you need, make it happen or you're out. Have your next career lined up either way before this last strategy so that you can Tarzan from one desk to the next with no/ minimal pay lapse in between.
 
  • Like
Reactions: myGTI

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,130 Posts
You have sat down and talked with him right? Like what your goal is, why you're here, why and how you need stuff done? Btw what exactly is your capacity in this situation? Is this like a franchise/chain? Or did he hire you? In which case it's self-sabotage and that just makes no sense to me.

Anyway I know two INFPs. I can't imagine them loving the idea of being steamrolled so if you're doing that, dial it down. The other thing might just be discomfort at the idea that an outsider wants to reorganize his shit which I don't think is type related. That might pass in time. Maybe quicker if you eased up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
1) CRM: Insightly.com (can be) free, have a subordinate enter the customer data for you. Makes for great busy work; have a subordinate handle your sales calls and document each call in Insightly. Also has a mobile app so you can access it wherever and the INFP can, too.
may have to try that hard part is that our current customer database is on antique software which I have hyper limited access to. And my underling is an idiot that is a family member of the owner that cannot even be trusted to mop the floor correctly or in a timely manner


1)
2) Google Calendar for scheduling.
Currently have a yahoo Cal setup as the owner uses yahoo mail for his biz account. still cannot get him to even look at it despite repeat requests to show him on his work terminal as well as event invites to every appointment scheduled.


1)
3) tap into his intuition- draft a hypothetical revenue projection calculated for each element you seek to change. Give him an ultimatum: get you what you need, make it happen or you're out. Have your next career lined up either way before this last strategy so that you can Tarzan from one desk to the next with no/ minimal pay lapse in between.
This seems to be my next step so I am currently lining up my ducks. I have had conversations along these lines but seems that when it comes to actual strategic planning it seems to escape him. Will buy ABC cool shiney tool that he has 4 spare of already when we need paper towels and a new toilet for one of our customer bathrooms.

Pretty sure it is a control thing as even stupid stuff he won't delegate it (he decided to clean the lobby over the weekend instead of fixing cars) as he says oh that is easy.

Another layer to the cake is that he found out he has MS which I think is adding stress and fear of the fact that he is losing his ability to do basic things and will need help as his body physically is starting to fail.
But instead of proactively putting in support systems to aid in the transition he is in functional denial about the reality of his condition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You have sat down and talked with him right? Like what your goal is, why you're here, why and how you need stuff done? Btw what exactly is your capacity in this situation? Is this like a franchise/chain? Or did he hire you? In which case it's self-sabotage and that just makes no sense to me.
I've tried having these but the are likely too much like confrontation for him and while if I can get him to focus by putting my foot down and demanding his time he does seem to answer the questions. There is a degree to which he gets frustrated that I don't understand his logic (spending a full day prepping a lift instead of the customer work, but it is so a overdue project can go on that lift even though it still isnt ready a week later SEE part about my underling for that reason) much of that issue stems from the fact that instead of externalizing and explaining why this project takes priority over that so I can better plan the schedule for the future he just does his own thing and I try to do the best I can to adjust what I can around what I observe.

This is a private business and the hiring process was beyond informal. You've likely had a more detailed negotiation when soliciting friends to help you move apartments. I do feel that it is self sabotage and trust me I am not the first that has been around long enough to see it. For me it seems insane as when I have an asset that has strengths or ability where I do not, I do what I can to make sure that it is fully utilized. However compared to the underling who skirts work, I ask what I can do to help or just find things to do. I will admit as of late I've been less likely to go beyond the directives given as the appreciation for these actions is usually either negative or not acknowledged. For example I have a friend who was able to repair a daily used critical diagnostic tool as a favor to me, the owner didn't even think to say thank you. When I said you are welcome he gave me a snide response that he didn't need to be thankful for that.


Anyway I know two INFPs. I can't imagine them loving the idea of being steamrolled so if you're doing that, dial it down. The other thing might just be discomfort at the idea that an outsider wants to reorganize his shit which I don't think is type related. That might pass in time. Maybe quicker if you eased up.

I have tried that too however when I am less pushy or just wait the situations get to a critical 5 alarm fire level which puts him into crisis mode where the job gets done but there are obvious consequences aka customers are not going to return for future business.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,931 Posts
may have to try that hard part is that our current customer database is on antique software which I have hyper limited access to. And my underling is an idiot that is a family member of the owner that cannot even be trusted to mop the floor correctly or in a timely manner




Currently have a yahoo Cal setup as the owner uses yahoo mail for his biz account. still cannot get him to even look at it despite repeat requests to show him on his work terminal as well as event invites to every appointment scheduled.




This seems to be my next step so I am currently lining up my ducks. I have had conversations along these lines but seems that when it comes to actual strategic planning it seems to escape him. Will buy ABC cool shiney tool that he has 4 spare of already when we need paper towels and a new toilet for one of our customer bathrooms.

Pretty sure it is a control thing as even stupid stuff he won't delegate it (he decided to clean the lobby over the weekend instead of fixing cars) as he says oh that is easy.

Another layer to the cake is that he found out he has MS which I think is adding stress and fear of the fact that he is losing his ability to do basic things and will need help as his body physically is starting to fail.
But instead of proactively putting in support systems to aid in the transition he is in functional denial about the reality of his condition.
Know any ENFJs? I have a hunch you'll best get through to him with a good cop/ bad cop approach.

When I managed a telemarketing firm, we'd have the 'bad cop' likely ESTJ/ ENTJ authoritative voices initiate, present the facts straightforward, lay it on raw. Then we'd switch off and close with a 'softer' personality, inspiring and coaxing them through the deal.

In your case, prepare a projection. Lay all of your facts out straight. Then have an 'expert' (a friend willing to play the roll of XYZ specialist) come in and hit with the feels. She could even be a 'CRM Rep/ marketing coordinator/ insert some bullshit title here).

Then excuse her and softly reiterate your point with a call to action.

I've done this before with two old offices; I got the results I wanted and at the telemarketing office-- a raise when the profits streamed in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,444 Posts
1 1st off forget about all the psychological type stuff. People read too much into the types often and I think your issue is much simpler than trying to look into advanced cognitive psychology.

2 Try to find out what motivates him. Obviously he likes working on the go kart and personal cars etc.

3 Use what motivate him to improve the place and help in the ways you want him to, make his personal goals one in the same w/ the business.

Talk to him about the go-kart and personal cars. There's potential those can be used to help drum up business. You could display go-karts, classic cars for customers, and maybe have a small side business of fixing go-karts and promote that. Agree to take some of the revenue you earn from the business to put towards fixing those go-carts, classic cars or whatever. You can treat it like paying for advertising and rather than have those projects just come out of his personal paycheck you can have it be part of the business expense. Doesn't have to be a huge amount of money, but it can help him feel more invested in making the business successful. All the time I'm amazed at how employers treat their employees poorly. You can pay people less if treat them better and help them to enjoy their job.

4 avoid conflict. If he avoids you, doesn't respond to IMs locks himself in office it's because something about the way you last interacted and how anticipates you acting that is causing anxiety. Rather than acting negatively, giving him ultimatums or acting passive aggressively forcing schedules upon him etc. act positively, try to motivate him. Use the things that personally motivates him, the go carts etc. personal cars as the thing you're working towards making it more feasible and lucrative for him to work on as main driving force behind scheduling, fixing stuff around the place etc. He's working on that stuff anyway. It's not like you'd have to sacrifice anything. Just change your attitude. You're both on the same team. The problem isn't just that he's not playing along with the things you're trying to do, you're not playing along w/ the things he's trying to do. To him working on those go-karts and personal cars is prob the whole reason why he does that for a living. To him if he can't do that what's the point. You got to make both your goals one in the same.

Regardless of how much money you make if you and the people you work with aren't happy working there you're not successful.
 

·
Registered
ENTJ, 8w7
Joined
·
2,796 Posts
Regardless of the MBTIs involved, your posts make it plain that you're working with assholes and no-hopers. If they can't be reasoned with, find another job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think you skimmed too much. He is MY boss, I work for him. Much of your advice would be far more applicable if I had any fundamental control. I am trying to manage up. Yes my attitude sucks but had you read the thread more carefully you would have a better grasp on why.

His 21 year old son works there as kinda my lacky but it is more like baby sitting a 10year old. You know the instructions that tell you to remove the microwaveable meal from the cardboard packaging? Yes, that is there for people like this kid. He doesn't think beyond the exact instructions you give him and even then he regularly misses the mark. I could drone on about how lazy he is, but that isn't the core of this thread.

As for your suggestion about showing interest in the side hobbies as promotional tools, I do that. During said go-cart night I stayed late (midnight) helping with the project which hit a snag and has yet to be finished but the parts for said project are still strewn all over one of the work benches. His project cars certainly earn us a significant amount of business. However, putting actual business on the back burner on a constant basis is not a smart move. That would be like developing a massive amount of business leads at a trade show then hoping they call you back to give you the biz.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,442 Posts
In my experiences companies with poor management and nepotism do not respond to any good intentions to improve things. I genuinely advocate jumping ship. This is going nowhere and your energy will be wasted because it is not about you but about an unintelligent management's receptivity and ability to change. Spend your time and attention on a healthier company.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,931 Posts
The U.S. Economy is doing be--- I mean, it's not circa 2008, but employment is still difficult to secure. Ultimately the ideal situation is to find a more formidable career fit, and get in and grow; but while the applications are being submitted, and the resumes uploaded, the situation at hand presents what I see as opportunity and the potential for raking in a goldmine. Just find a way to unlock him; and you've found the starting point for a solution.

Don't throw the baby out with the bath water just yet; but keep your trigger finger on the resume launch button.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,444 Posts
Well regardless of who's the supposed superior it sounds like your role is more managerial. Perhaps your problem is more a matter of needing to treat him like a little kid, "we need to clean up our toys after we're done playing with them" without being condescending which could be tricky. Anyway the main point I was making before is just to try to focus on positive motivation, start treating those projects (go-cart) more as rewards for achieving the things you want to get done. That might work regardless of whether you're rewarding someone below you or whether it's someone in authority over you. My suggestions might not work for your situation, just trying to give examples of potential solutions.

John C. Maxwell writes a bunch of managerial books about that sort of thing. I'd recommend checking them out. Stuff like that I find is good just to get the gears turning in different directions to help come up with potential solutions.

Good Luck :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well regardless of who's the supposed superior it sounds like your role is more managerial. Perhaps your problem is more a matter of needing to treat him like a little kid, "we need to clean up our toys after we're done playing with them" without being condescending which could be tricky. Anyway the main point I was making before is just to try to focus on positive motivation, start treating those projects (go-cart) more as rewards for achieving the things you want to get done. That might work regardless of whether you're rewarding someone below you or whether it's someone in authority over you. My suggestions might not work for your situation, just trying to give examples of potential solutions.

John C. Maxwell writes a bunch of managerial books about that sort of thing. I'd recommend checking them out. Stuff like that I find is good just to get the gears turning in different directions to help come up with potential solutions.

Good Luck :)

your suggestion is a good one just not for this situation. He does what he wants when he wants and I have almost 0 control, which shouldn't be if my job is to make schedule....

I could schedule a customer for a 9am appointment to have a routine job done 2 weeks in advance. When the day comes at 930 he still hasn't pulled car in because he's on FaceBook or something. 10am rolls around and I am out with the customer waiting for him to start and the customer can see their car is in the parking lot and it hasn't even moved. Only so much distractions I can do in our boring wating room (tried to fix that too but seeing as how we have no electricity the giant tv sitting on the floor is rather useless) Many times in this case I am running out back begging him to just let me pull the car out of the view of the customer so the fact that he is just fucking off isn't as insultingly obvious. Yes shit comes up but this isn't a one time oops but a weekly event.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
INFP here.

If your boss is an INFP, relatively healthy, and if he isn't aware of it already (though I can't see how he couldn't be at this point?), he would likely respond very readily to being made more aware of how negatively his behavior impacts his customers (i.e. make it very real to him with that not getting a repair done when expected can throw a wrench into people's schedules). I'm a terrible perceiver when it comes to actions that have consequences that just affect me, but I like to be a person of my word to others. If it seems like many of his customers have accepted the tradeoff to his lax scheduling in order to have the quality of work, you can still show him an anecdote or two that says otherwise generally and especially for the more unaware customers.

Similarly, if you were to bring up the changing locks/passwords thing to him (i.e. ask levelly about if there's something you two need to work out, because this is an indication of distrust or ill will, and that doesn't bode well for two people who need to work together), an INFP, with their heightened awareness of fairness and what not, would likely own up (and also feel pretty ashamed). Asking for better channels of communication from there would be very reasonable.

Keep talking to him, and see if you can talk about what his vision is for the place and what makes him do and/or enjoy the work. Ask him about his approach to the logistical side of things. Pitch an idea that would both align with his larger goals and yours, and then ask if you can try out implementing it. You could also frame it as a sort of "It would be awesome to have an opportunity to leverage my strengths more by taking on X and X task." INFPs love respecting people's individualism and seeing others have the type of environment that allows them to uniquely operate at their best. And regardless of MBTI type, involving other involved parties in the decision making process makes consensus (at least on goals, ground rules, org structure) and implementation much easier to reach.

Additionally, plenty of people say they don't like being micromanaged, but all of my intuitive friends and I really make a huge big fuss about how stifling it is for us. I would say it's probably best to scale back on checking in on him a bunch and try out discussing the big picture why's, how's, and goals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
INFP here.

If your boss is an INFP, relatively healthy, and if he isn't aware of it already (though I can't see how he couldn't be at this point?), he would likely respond very readily to being made more aware of how negatively his behavior impacts his customers (i.e. make it very real to him with that not getting a repair done when expected can throw a wrench into people's schedules). I'm a terrible perceiver when it comes to actions that have consequences that just affect me, but I like to be a person of my word to others. If it seems like many of his customers have accepted the tradeoff to his lax scheduling in order to have the quality of work, you can still show him an anecdote or two that says otherwise generally and especially for the more unaware customers.

Similarly, if you were to bring up the changing locks/passwords thing to him (i.e. ask levelly about if there's something you two need to work out, because this is an indication of distrust or ill will, and that doesn't bode well for two people who need to work together), an INFP, with their heightened awareness of fairness and what not, would likely own up (and also feel pretty ashamed). Asking for better channels of communication from there would be very reasonable.

Keep talking to him, and see if you can talk about what his vision is for the place and what makes him do and/or enjoy the work. Ask him about his approach to the logistical side of things. Pitch an idea that would both align with his larger goals and yours, and then ask if you can try out implementing it. You could also frame it as a sort of "It would be awesome to have an opportunity to leverage my strengths more by taking on X and X task." INFPs love respecting people's individualism and seeing others have the type of environment that allows them to uniquely operate at their best. And regardless of MBTI type, involving other involved parties in the decision making process makes consensus (at least on goals, ground rules, org structure) and implementation much easier to reach.

Additionally, plenty of people say they don't like being micromanaged, but all of my intuitive friends and I really make a huge big fuss about how stifling it is for us. I would say it's probably best to scale back on checking in on him a bunch and try out discussing the big picture why's, how's, and goals.
Salt you will be getting PM's as I pick your brain like it is a gosh darn summer harvest.

Thank you for shedding some insight.

most of your suggestions I will be weaving into my plan. I think you are right about the last part. However I would like you advice on how to get a status update without seeming to be hovering. As I am the face of the customer side and unless I chase him down to get updates for the customers he doesn't provide them. We talked briefly as he feels that giving progress reports only makes them think it will be done sooner. I countered with it is fine to not update customers on the progress when you don't answer the phone and have a full VM in box. ( his old method) Customers have told both me and him how much they like knowing what is going on and the updates i provide. But I do see how this mother henning is working to increase the divide and why he would hide in his office to avoid them. there has to be some sort of balance that can be struck. And this would be far less of an issue if he stuck to the job time estimates he gave. When a car is two weeks overdue the customer has a right to seek some answers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
Salt you will be getting PM's as I pick your brain like it is a gosh darn summer harvest.

Thank you for shedding some insight.

most of your suggestions I will be weaving into my plan. I think you are right about the last part. However I would like you advice on how to get a status update without seeming to be hovering. As I am the face of the customer side and unless I chase him down to get updates for the customers he doesn't provide them. We talked briefly as he feels that giving progress reports only makes them think it will be done sooner. I countered with it is fine to not update customers on the progress when you don't answer the phone and have a full VM in box. ( his old method) Customers have told both me and him how much they like knowing what is going on and the updates i provide. But I do see how this mother henning is working to increase the divide and why he would hide in his office to avoid them. there has to be some sort of balance that can be struck. And this would be far less of an issue if he stuck to the job time estimates he gave. When a car is two weeks overdue the customer has a right to seek some answers.
Hmmm... I think the answer to how to get status updates more regularly from your boss depends both on the type work and his personality/work style, and I'm completely unfamiliar with the mechanical. Are a lot of tasks difficult to estimate a time window? What type of tasks are those? Are there other logistical issues like delays because of ordering parts? Now that I think about it, plenty of customers probably have some similar questions. Maybe you could make a poignant analogy/metaphor for him about waiting in the dark about something, or start by telling him about how UPS and Fedex have ruined everybody's ability to patiently wait for a package by giving people their almost real time package tracking data :laughing:

Tell him that you yourself (if this is true!) would like to know more about what his side of the work looks like (If you can express a personal interest in the work, do so.). He probably knew he wasn't great with the customer service side, since he brought you on and it sounds like things were/are a mess. Let him know that you're happy to take this stuff off his plate. And that, with the way you operate, it's your need to have more information in advance, too, so it's easier for you to figure out the best ways to manage customer's expectations and inquiries. See if you can troubleshoot the best ways for information exchange together. If regular meetings aren't a good fit, see if there are other modes like a digital platform (could be as simple as Google spreadsheets or as lo fi as a whiteboard in a common space) that both of you would have access to and would keep track of different jobs, parts ordered, etc., so that you to see at a glance what you can update customers without having to ask him about it.

All of the above are loose suggestions that revolve around the idea of pretty much having a conversation about working on tackling issues together, from the same side, and maybe even having some creative fun with it. All in all, I think that if you continue to hit walls with your boss, and he's still unwilling have an open conversation about solving some very apparent issues at the business together, then it may be time to reconsider your time there, as others have also suggested.
 

·
Registered
INFJ 4w3 sp/sx
Joined
·
1,553 Posts
Get out of this job, you deserve something better. There's nothing worse than working for an incompetent boss and people like him don't change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,130 Posts
From my perspective:

You: you were hired to improve the efficiency of this place, that is your one and only goal. Currently you have to work around/despite the owner instead of with him or alongside him. Increasing the efficiency will also make everything better for everyone and that justifies toe-stepping.

Him: he hired someone and was expecting the person to adapt to him/his setup. Instead he's got someone whose throwing his weight around and acting like he owns the place who through either actions or words is criticizing everything. Some part of him realizes this isn't fair which is why he hasn't asked you to leave but at the same time he can't just do what you tell him to since that would undermine his self-imagine and possibly his rapport with his workers so instead he gets passive-aggressive.

My suggestions? Honestly this situation seems like it has spiraled badly. BUT!

1) Make a peace offering. You might not think you've done anything wrong but it seems to me like he does. People care less about your intentions and more about the stuff more directly observable, from his perspective you've just been a domineering, presumptuous, criticizing dickbutt. Say you want to speak to him but allow him to set the when and where. It'll ratify his authority and make him feel better. What you wanna do here is make him feel in charge without ceding so much power that you can't do your job anymore, if he's pliable I imagine it would be much easier to do your job. Explain the how's and why's of your recommendations (the benefits in terms of client service, image, costs and such), btw make your recommendations more palatable by making them sound like suggestions instead of 'we need to do this.' Instead of hitting him up for regular updates schedule a time for 'joint-updates,' it's going to amount to the same thing largely, you get what you need from him but he'll get something from you (or perceive to) so he won't feel like he's bowing to you. And don't do stuff like the favor thing again without checking in with him first, it just seems massively disrespectful.

You're going to need a little obsequiousness if you want whatever you do here to stick. If things continue on as they are you'll either leave or he'll ask you to leave and everything will just revert to what they were. So placate him, work in a capacity he's okay with until you have something tangible to show for your work. Hopefully he'll be reasonable enough to listen then and be more willing to work with instead of against you.

2) Don't give him an ultimatum. Seriously ultimatums are almost always a terrible idea, they should be right next to the 'self-destruct' button. It means things have deteriorated pretty much past reparation. Only do it if there's nearly no hope of salvaging relations.

3) If he's too obstinate to see sense, leave. He's already showed a self-destructive tendency, granted you helped, but if you alter your behaviour to not be so... objectionable and he's still pouting there's nothing to be achieved there.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,877 Posts
Another INFP here.

I can't really speak in working terms but something that needs to be known about INFPs, although individual may vary greatly, is our strong avoidance during heightened stress, excessive self focus and fear of failure and incompetency when faced with huge sudden responsibilities. Even more so if the INFP in question is an enneagram 9 or a phobic 6.

Making him see the unfairness of his actions, making him aware of his inefficient behavior and how it's affecting the entire workplace and the service that you're meant to provide might open his eyes. I personally enjoy criticism a lot because, as self critical as I am, I often forget to look at things from a social perspective as it's not really my concern and that can be hazardous in a working setting. If it comes from a genuine place and it's not in the form of a personal attack (ie: I don't like you and everything you do is wrong, I don't care about your reasons) and it's backed up by solid facts, then I'll be the first one to embrace any criticism, introspect and reconsider my behavior. To make concrete changes to everything that went wrong and my own lack of carefulness.

Many INFPs are quite pragmatic deep down but so swayed by personal judgement and an inability to express it and make plans for more people than just themselves. Added responsibility is a burden, I do not wish to control people nor I like it, I'm completely set in having self control and figuring out which new solutions might work for me based on personal experience. This is something an ENTJ can help with wonderfully though more as a guidance, not in a forceful way.

But this person seems very unprepared for the job, if it doesn't stop consider changing direction.
You deserve better than being stuck in an extremely unorganized and unreliable office.
 

·
Chatterbox, MOTM August 2013
Joined
·
10,959 Posts
Not what you want to hear, but ... I'd bail on the job.

You were told that you were hired to schedule, manage and streamline efficiency, yet your valid suggestions are being ignored and instead, it appears you were hired to simply deal with the fallout of the old system - allowing the mechanic/owner to piddle around and do [whatever] while you take on all the stress of his short-sighted, self-absorbed bullshit.

It sounds like your ideas are never going to be taken seriously. Your function appears to be having to act as the mouthpiece for the mechanic/owner who doesn't want to deal with customers' valid dissatisfaction. You have no real authority, but you're going to get blamed for whatever goes wrong - I can hear it now ..."poor management". You've been asked to take on all the responiblity, and given no authority. In short, you've been hired to be the Whipping Boy.

Most of the advice you've gotten here is along the lines of "improve you sensitivity and communication skills" or "realize that approaching him with ultimatums will only make him withdraw further", or "make him aware that his behvior is affecting the workplace". Oh, fuck that.

This guy is a passive/aggressive, manipulative jerk who is going to continue to make your life miserable, despite your willingness to compromise. He's not a child. He's a grown man, fully aware of his behavior and the problems it causes. He just doesn't want to deal with it. I'd quit walking around on eggshells with the guy and just sit him down and flatout ask him, "You hired me to implement changes that will improve and grow this business, yet you fail to take any of my suggestions seriously. What exactly is it that you expect me to do?"

Unless he is willing to change his behavior (not likely) he's going to continue to make your life miserable. Something else you have to look at is the longterm fallout of continuing to work for this guy. If things continue as they are, how is this work experience going to look on your resume a few years from now. What sort of negative things will your (then) former employer say about your work experience? He's not going to give you glowing reference, more likely will put the blame for his failures on you - play the part of the wounded party - just like he is doing now.

Bail.
 
1 - 20 of 75 Posts
Top