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So I was thinking about what I could change my career to. Ever since I was a child nursing always appealed to me but I never pursued it. Since I can no longer do jobs that are very physical I've decided that nursing might be a good alternative. I understand it's a lot of time on your feet but at least I won't be jumping in and out of a truck, hooking up and unhooking loads. I think I can handle walking for long periods of time.

However, there is one thing that concerns me. I am not very sympathetic, I would assume nursing would require that :blushed:. It could work to my benefit I guess, it will be easy for me to treat a patient without getting too caught up, but on the flip side I might not be able to give the emotional support a patient may need. Because of this psychiatric nursing seems like a good choice to me because it's not too "hands on" and because it incorporates social work. I can honestly say I do care about people; specifically people who have experienced the same troubles in life as myself. I don't know if this is something specific to me because I have read quite a bit about ISTP's not really caring much about other people's problems. I can listen to problems as long as we are working toward a solution, but listening to a person go on and on endlessly about the perils of life...that I can't do. I can help you with your problems but I'm not going to listen to them without a plan of action.

I am interested in hearing other people's opinions in regard to this profession. Would you be able to be a nurse? Why or why not? If you would which area of nursing would you choose?
 

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Clarified, you and I are in the same boat, looks like. I'm trying to figure out what direction to go, career-wise. I'll probably have to go to school for whatever I choose, since I've been self-employed for almost a decade now - no one will look at my resume, impressive though it *was* in 2001, because I've been effectively "unemployed" for so long.

I did think about nursing, but I've dismissed it for the same reasons you're asking - I don't think I have the right personality for it. I'm a perfectly pleasant individual, but sympathy/coddling doesn't come naturally to me at all. But like you said - that could be an advantage in nursing, being a bit detached from the patient. At least for *you* anyway. The patient's family members might feel differently.

I'm sure there are types of nursing that wouldn't require so much emotional investment. Not sure about psychiatric nursing... that would be interesting, but I would imagine there would be patients that really test your... patience (sorry, that wasn't deliberate).

I actually would consider emergency nursing - the patients are only there for a short period of time before either being discharged or moved to a floor... it's fast paced, so there's no stagnation... most patients would be there because of their own stupidity, and the couple times I've been in the emergency room the nurses and doctors are as unsympathetic as can be. And I'm sure there's a high turnover rate (ie: better chance of getting in) because it's probably pretty high stress.

That's all I got.
 

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I considered nursing as well. I had to give up on the idea because of one main reason: the schedule. It is an incredible amount of nighttime shift work, when you are starting out. You begin at the bottom of the totem pole and work night shifts for years, or I guess you get lucky and get a job in a doctor's office with 8-5 hours.

I'm not too gushing or sympathetic either, unless it's kids. I thought about working maternity but then I thought... when a baby dies (which eventually will happen no matter how good the prenatal care)..it might be too depressing for me! We might not be super sympathetic, but we probably make damn competent nurses.

My aunt is a career nurse, worked forEVER on night shifts, and now she's finally reached a seniority level where she can supervise (she works in nursing homes). I couldn't do it because of my kids -- I wanted more regular hours and i didn't want to work weekends.

Can you do the hospital environment? The bedpans, the vomiting, the shit, etc? I wasn't 100% sure on that..

I have another ISTP friend who just became an EMT and she loves it -- drive the ambulance, pick em up, and then dump them at the hospital. :wink:
 

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Many people thought I should I become a paramedic because I'm calm and caring. But its a lot of responsibility to me. Someone else's life is in your hands don't think I could deal with that everyday.I want to be in the police and whilst I know there will be casualties I can deal with things should the situation come out of the blue. A lot of nurses I've met in hospitals have not just simply been uncaring but bitches so I wouldn't worry that you are unsympathetic. :tongue: My gran used to be a nurse and it worked out for her so if you wanna do it go for it :happy:
 

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However, there is one thing that concerns me. I am not very sympathetic, I would assume nursing would require that :blushed:
I think it's more to do with the fact that we're not good at showing it.

To answer your question:

No, I never considered nursing, but that's because I'm no fan of hospitals. Spent enough time in them as a kid.

Ever since I was a child nursing always appealed to me but I never pursued it. Since I can no longer do jobs that are very physical I've decided that nursing might be a good alternative.
Based on that alone I reckon you should go for it. I don't know how old you are but to have had an interest in something since forever, basically, would indicate to me that you would enjoy it, and if you enjoy it you'd probably be pretty good at it.
 

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My wife is currently in CNA school, my mom was a USAF nurse, and some of my friends are nurses. I can say absolutely and unequivocally that I would only do it for the paycheck and there's no way I could wipe someone else's ass without gagging.

On the flip side, a lot of people have told me that I'd make an excellent counselor...other than the fact that I hate small talk and don't want to listen to emo bullshit all day long.
 

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If you're not squeamish,*which I am* its not a bad gig at all. Ironic that someone posted this topic. I just was reading classifieds today that had a RN position open at a federal prison. Starting pay was $28/hr. Not too shabby.
 

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So I was thinking about what I could change my career to. Ever since I was a child nursing always appealed to me but I never pursued it. Since I can no longer do jobs that are very physical I've decided that nursing might be a good alternative. I understand it's a lot of time on your feet but at least I won't be jumping in and out of a truck, hooking up and unhooking loads. I think I can handle walking for long periods of time.

However, there is one thing that concerns me. I am not very sympathetic, I would assume nursing would require that :blushed:. It could work to my benefit I guess, it will be easy for me to treat a patient without getting too caught up, but on the flip side I might not be able to give the emotional support a patient may need. Because of this psychiatric nursing seems like a good choice to me because it's not too "hands on" and because it incorporates social work. I can honestly say I do care about people; specifically people who have experienced the same troubles in life as myself. I don't know if this is something specific to me because I have read quite a bit about ISTP's not really caring much about other people's problems. I can listen to problems as long as we are working toward a solution, but listening to a person go on and on endlessly about the perils of life...that I can't do. I can help you with your problems but I'm not going to listen to them without a plan of action.

I am interested in hearing other people's opinions in regard to this profession. Would you be able to be a nurse? Why or why not? If you would which area of nursing would you choose?
my daughter has cystic fibrosis so we have spent alot of time in and out of hospitals. i can tell you this for a fact, nurses coming in on top of you at all hours of the day being super nice and super fake when you feel like shit is the worst thing in the world. i hate most of them. i just want to be left the fuck alone with my kid and i don't want to participate in their dull and sickly sweet banter. i can tell you an istp nurse coming in and just taking care of the practical side of things and feeling comfortable because they feel comfortable in silence and who would respect the fact i'm trying to forget i'm there by letting me watch the sopranos in peace would be like heaven. although something tells me you would bring plenty good cheer and that i would gladly have my episode of the sopranos interupted for some real banter, like i could probably get away with saying to an istp nurse " don't ya just hate sick kids, there fuckin depressing aren't they?" and they'd know it was a joke, not like most nurses i've come across who are just devoid of a sense of humour. i really hate them alot. they blindly follow the rules too even when the rules are wrong. an istp at least would use their common sense and do the right thing. oh and did i mention how much i fucking hate them?

i say do the world a favour and go for it. :happy:
 
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on second thoughts an istp might find it soul destroying to be restricted to such a rigid schedule. nurses put in fierce long hours, and then there's the fact that alot of them by their nature would clash a bit with yours and you might just become allergic to all your work colleagues. unless maybe you become a doctor of some kind. i'd imagine an istp would pay a close enough attention to all the details and leave no stone unturned in making sure my daughter gets the best care. a doctor who doesn't follow everything the pharmaceutical companies tell them, i swear to god it would make you sick when you see the muddled way our hospitals are run, it's a disgrace. a doctor who speaks the truth and who isn't afraid to give you the cold hard facts when you need to hear them would be an asset to any hospital. and there's be no farting about filling out forms asking the most pointless questions like i kid you not "does mummy and daddy live at home together?" i mean seriously, wtf? why do they need to know that? what business is it of theirs? i told her where she could stick her form and i'd imagine an istp doctor would not stand for that kind of retardation. wasted energy, stressful for everyone.

istp's are hilarious too. in the kind of stressful environment of dealing with misery it's refreshing to have someone make you laugh. laughter is the best medicine after all. it has been proven it helps your chances of recovering. actually the more i think about it an istp doctor would be the best thing ever. i can just picture a jolly 50 year old istp doctor, a fucking guru from all his experience, going around making all the patients laugh and knowing exactly what to say to lift the situation before it descends into everyone crying.

somehow i don't think an istp male would like telling new people he meets that he's a nurse. i think an istp would hate that.am i wrong?
 
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I can handle blood and guts with no problem. When it comes to puke and shit, well things get a little touch and go. This is why I am thinking about psych nursing because it won't require too much ass wiping, at least I hope it doesn't. Besides there are so many different areas of nursing to choose from that I could probably find something that will be a good fit for me.

The long hours and regimented schedule, I think I can handle it. I am a night owl by nature so I wouldn't have an issue working at night. And as long as no one is breathing down my neck I can handle schedules. Micro-managing makes me crazy. My work ethic usually gets me by in that regard but there is usually one prick that has to come along and get all in my business. Also, at work my personality changes and I turn into a weak "J". I'm usually on time, pretty organized, and orderly. When I get home, that's the end of that.

TeaBiscits I totally understand where you're coming from about being bothered by nurses. My son (and I actually) has osteogenesis imperfecta or Brittle Bone Disease. So I know about the syrupy sweet "disposition" you're referring to. I don't know of one parent that appreciates that...well there must be some otherwise they wouldn't do it. I am very good at respecting people's space and solitude. I think I'm comfortably quiet...like I don't have a menacing silence to me if that makes sense. I don't think people get the feeling of I better not say anything to her or she'll bite my head off type of vibe from me. I think I'm approachable but not inviting.

Being a doctor sounds great to me. Figuring out what's wrong with people seems so interesting. There's just that pesky thing called school and I just can't get my head around how much of it I would have to do.
 

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I can handle blood and guts with no problem. When it comes to puke and shit, well things get a little touch and go. This is why I am thinking about psych nursing because it won't require too much ass wiping, at least I hope it doesn't. Besides there are so many different areas of nursing to choose from that I could probably find something that will be a good fit for me.

The long hours and regimented schedule, I think I can handle it. I am a night owl by nature so I wouldn't have an issue working at night. And as long as no one is breathing down my neck I can handle schedules. Micro-managing makes me crazy. My work ethic usually gets me by in that regard but there is usually one prick that has to come along and get all in my business. Also, at work my personality changes and I turn into a weak "J". I'm usually on time, pretty organized, and orderly. When I get home, that's the end of that.

TeaBiscits I totally understand where you're coming from about being bothered by nurses. My son (and I actually) has osteogenesis imperfecta or Brittle Bone Disease. So I know about the syrupy sweet "disposition" you're referring to. I don't know of one parent that appreciates that...well there must be some otherwise they wouldn't do it. I am very good at respecting people's space and solitude. I think I'm comfortably quiet...like I don't have a menacing silence to me if that makes sense. I don't think people get the feeling of I better not say anything to her or she'll bite my head off type of vibe from me. I think I'm approachable but not inviting.

Being a doctor sounds great to me. Figuring out what's wrong with people seems so interesting. There's just that pesky thing called school and I just can't get my head around how much of it I would have to do.
i know exactly what you mean about the whole 20 years in college business. you'd be 90 by the time your a real doctor.

you don't have a menacing silence like it's obvious you are happy out in your own world but are available for talkin if someone has something interesting to say. that makes perfect sense.

but you know if your tied down with your daughter college might be a good place to have a little freedom. i don't know what country your from or if there is a grant system in place or what. i'm applying for a grant next year, my daughter is in her early teens now and so it's a bit easier freedom wise. i'm also planing on getting a cleaner. let some youngone who loves to clean in to do it, give her a job in these recessionary times. let her feel satisfied over a job well done. boost her self esteem and start her off on her way to setting up her own cleaning business. i have a girl picked out and all i'm just waiting to move to a new house so she'll be close by. there is nothing in this world she loves more than cleaning, she might as well be doing something she loves with pride and getting paid than sitting at home feeling useless with no job.
 

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However, there is one thing that concerns me. I am not very sympathetic, I would assume nursing would require that :blushed:. It could work to my benefit I guess, it will be easy for me to treat a patient without getting too caught up, but on the flip side I might not be able to give the emotional support a patient may need. Because of this psychiatric nursing seems like a good choice to me because it's not too "hands on" and because it incorporates social work. I can honestly say I do care about people; specifically people who have experienced the same troubles in life as myself. I don't know if this is something specific to me because I have read quite a bit about ISTP's not really caring much about other people's problems. I can listen to problems as long as we are working toward a solution, but listening to a person go on and on endlessly about the perils of life...that I can't do. I can help you with your problems but I'm not going to listen to them without a plan of action.
I did think about nursing, but I've dismissed it for the same reasons you're asking - I don't think I have the right personality for it. I'm a perfectly pleasant individual, but sympathy/coddling doesn't come naturally to me at all. But like you said - that could be an advantage in nursing, being a bit detached from the patient. At least for *you* anyway. The patient's family members might feel differently.
I considered nursing as well. I had to give up on the idea because of one main reason: the schedule. It is an incredible amount of nighttime shift work, when you are starting out. You begin at the bottom of the totem pole and work night shifts for years, or I guess you get lucky and get a job in a doctor's office with 8-5 hours.

I'm not too gushing or sympathetic either, unless it's kids. I thought about working maternity but then I thought... when a baby dies (which eventually will happen no matter how good the prenatal care)..it might be too depressing for me! We might not be super sympathetic, but we probably make damn competent nurses.
Being someone who worked for an agency that had to intervene between disputes, and because of a traumatic experience in the past two years to a family member that finds me at the hospital on a weekly basis, this is what I have observed. Some find a great need for being appreciated and this seems to become problematic when they are stressed or have not had the opportunity to get adequate rest. They have a delusion of persecution about them which always made them high maintenance employees. However for the most part, I have never seen anyone more realistic about life in general than R.N.s. They may attempt to be sympathetic, but they can't. Their jobs require them to be as hands off and not getting attached. Remember what type of client they are generally working with. I think that administrators have this belief that they should be some gushy motherly type, but those administrators who have actually done the job would prefer they work in a detached mode. They are highly technical (they have to be, I would take a nurses diagnosis before a doctor's anytime).

These are the people I want around when a crisis unfolds. They have been through the scenario so many times, they react. Doctors are too damn concerned about a lawsuit. The nurses I have observed are generally cool calm and collected when needed, but funny as hell with their direct comments. In general they're realists. As for Ms. Fix It, I am not sure where you reside, but where I am there is such a shortage of R.N.s that they make their own schedules. I know some who work 3-12s, 4-12s, PRN, alternate 4 day-3 day work periods, etc. Because there is such a shortage, those who remain in the field have carte blanche in flexing their schedules. I think that SPs in general would make excellent nursing staff because of the flexible schedules, not to mention they make incredible money. I guess all of the nurses I know personally have been in the field for decades and pretty much work when they want. None of them work for a particular hospital, instead the rover in a regionally.
 

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I am in school now to get a BSN. I am not a very caring person by nature but I feel I can be professional enough to get the job done. I plan on working in an ICU or OHU for a few years. After that I will go back to school to become a nurse anesthetist. This is the ideal nursing job for me. It is hands on, great pay, and your patient is asleep for 90% of the time you're with them. Plus I love the OR atmosphere.
 

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From what I heard, nursing can be really physical, e.g. lifting people. That will probably not apply to psychiatric nursing and maybe it doesn't apply to all other nurses either.

Anyways for me, nursing wouldn't be the right thing. Puke, shit, blood? No, thank you. See people suffer? I can't deal with that for long. If someone complained about some nagging illness, I could take it. I wouldn't care, but see people in real pain? I'd feel the pain!

In the medical field, I think driving an abulance would appeal most to me.

I'm in IT (systems analyst and software developer) and I like it. I often wonder if engineering would have been the better choice, especially research would be cool, but IT is okay. It's not physical at all, but requires knowledge. You might be able to teach yourself, if you're motivated. When you become good, you can probably also get a job without a fancy education. Still, probably not a short term solution.

I have a book on MBTI and it says that "dental or medical assistant" (among many others) are good fits for the ISTP. Dental assistant doesn't sound physically challenging at all, but I have no idea what education would be needed. It wouldn't fit me, I've seen people suffer at the dentist and I felt the pain.

I served 13 months in compulsory paid community service. I was working at a workshop for disabled people, doing all kinds of things. Supervising, transportation of people and/or things (also some heavy lifting) or whatever needed to be done. When supervising, I joined the disabled people in whatever they did (disassembling electronic devices, packaging stuff, gardening or whatever). The job was okay. Not more, not less, but maybe that (or sth. similar) would be something for you to consider.

And on a final note, I want to encourage you to be a little more egoistic. Don't worry so much about if you make people happy with your job ... unless that's what you want. If you want to be a nurse, follow the ISTP motto: Just do it.
 

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It's so funny that this topic came up here, because after i commented last week, my niece was born with complications and just got out of the NICU today. I went to the hospital to see her last weekend, and that was my first time in a NICU.

I was soooo pulled by that place. I wanted to work there in the worst kind of way. Seeing all those tiny babies lined up in little incubators, charts and monitors and equipment everywhere...God I just know that I could work there and love it.

And what's funny about it, is that I wasn't overcome with gushy feelings toward the families...just a feeling that I would be good at those tasks for some reason..it helps that i love newborns, but I am thinking the underlying motive is wanting to FIX their problems.
I have been thinking that NICU nursing might be my second career when I'm done with engineering. I've got to get my kids through school, and then I might make the leap finally.

edited to add-- I just remembered about 8 years ago, I briefly knew another engineer who lasted only a year in his job (after college) -- and he totally abandoned his career and went to nursing school. Interesting! At the time I thought it was crazy, but now....
 

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Of course I have no clue what kind of nursing you mean, and with the different countries having different regulations about what a person called "nurse" can and cannot do.. well, you know better of course. I myself was once a nurse but only by title: my job was to clean rooms. However, I've seen my share of the health care people from the other side.

Nursing can be very physical. My schooltime friend did just bust her back very badly because a bit heavier lady wanted to go potty five times a night and she was alone in the night watch. (She was also too nice to tell her to stay put and use the appliances..) However, there is a chance that there is a lot of lifting and carrying and supporting and stuff going on in the nursing world, the difference to the warehouse work being the absence of liftforks. It might be very heavy and very un-ergonomical.

I'm not sure whether nursing has any problem solving in the picture. I have understood that it's the doctors that do that part while nurses (at least the lower ranked ones) only do menial tasks. I'd check this up first.

The hospitals can easily be places of strict hierarchy. At least in the one I worked there was no rule that a doctor wouldn't break (like "don't walk on a freshly walked floor you moron") and as a lowly temp nurseling I wasn't supposed to call them on that. There was one ward where the higher ranked nurses would actually help me, but they had an extraordinary head nurse. Also, the work load here is huge and the salaries are poor, and because nursing is still being considered a bit of a calling instead of a real job or, heaven forbid, a career, the situation is not really improving. A couple uncaring bastads would do the nursing world a lot good.


Then a rant about whether a nurse should be an F type or not:

Comforting and stuff can be done (in my opinion even better) without being an F. Remember how you felt when you lost someone (a gf walked out or whatever), hurt yourself and so on, and think what you'd wanted to hear then - then take that thing that'd comfort you best and offer it to the patients. Just look at them and see if it worked, if not, try something else.. Also, not actually sharing that feeling in an F way (aka "caring") is, as I see it, a good thing, because it makes you more concentrated on how the patient feels and not how YOU feel about the patient feeling bad.

This brings me to
specifically people who have experienced the same troubles in life as myself. I don't know if this is something specific to me because I have read quite a bit about ISTP's not really caring much about other people's problems. I can listen to problems as long as we are working toward a solution, but listening to a person go on and on endlessly about the perils of life...that I can't do. I can help you with your problems but I'm not going to listen to them without a plan of action.
That's stupid.
You should take a good look about what your goal is. What is helping and what is not? If you've gone through anything you should've noticed that there is no magic switch that someone ELSE can pull and that'd make everything all right. There is no problem for you to solve. There is no need to actually care about their problems and issues, either. One can NEVER really change the way another person is or thinks or behaves; the only person that can do this is he/she themselves. Very often the thing is that people have nobody to talk to and it's hard to get distance to the stuff that's happening when you can't let the feelings out. If you feel there's nothing you can say or do, just switch to "oh, really?" and "mh-hm".

You know the story about teaching a poor man to fish, instead of giving him one? There is no fish here. And learning fishing takes goddamned long thing to do and looks like they're doing nothing. And sometimes they're actually doing nothing, too..

Things that work best in the emotional crises in my opinion:
- Asking how the other one feels (and not assuming you know how they should in the situation they are in),
- listening to what they say (and not giving them personal advice because what do you know anyway, they probably heard it several times before) and
- being honest (and not telling what you assume they'd want to hear because that's just so damned fake).

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Edit:

An example from an operating room, patient having pains during a surgery. The doctor says: "this doesn't hurt" and continues. The nurse looks at the patient and asks: "does it feel like this-and-this? Yes? Yeah, it can do that".

Edit 2:

Forgot this: No, I wouldn't be a nurse, because there's too much obeying orders and too little pay. I could be a doctor, I guess, if I wouldn't get this puke reflex every time I smell something bad. I could probably consider getting some kind of therapist degree..
 
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Could I be a nurse?...yes
Would I want to be?...no..mainly to many whiny ppl getting in the way of the real hurt ppl....plus I don't want a job were my duties may consist of cleaning bed pans, shaving some guy's testicles for a heart surgery....or cleaning up after old ppl...or watching ppl suffer if they arent getting better...

I'm doing clinical lab science.....look it up you might like it more than nursing....still in the medical field just don't have to deal with patients...just a microscope tons of lab equipment..and body fluids/tissues in sample sizes :p
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Could I be a nurse?...yes
Would I want to be?...no..mainly to many whiny ppl getting in the way of the real hurt ppl....plus I don't want a job were my duties may consist of cleaning bed pans, shaving some guy's testicles for a heart surgery....or cleaning up after old ppl...or watching ppl suffer if they arent getting better...

I'm doing clinical lab science.....look it up you might like it more than nursing....still in the medical field just don't have to deal with patients...just a microscope tons of lab equipment..and body fluids/tissues in sample sizes :p
Hey, that doesn't look too bad. I researched it a little and it looks like the job outlook is excellent. I figure that if I'm going to spend a whole bunch of time in school I had better have a job when it get done lol I know nothing is promised but it's good to know the jobs are out there...just like nursing. Anything in the medical field interests me.
 
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