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Birdie Borracho
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm curious to know other's experiences. As ENTPs, we are often distinguishable, because we are often detached from cultural stereotypes. Every ethnicity and cultural group is a "Proud people." Conveniently, type percentages are relatively similar all over the world. I can only imagine how difficult it would have been to be an ENTP in a small rural farming community, somewhere.

(WARNING, I AM MAKING GENERALIZATIONS THAT DO NOT APPLY TO EVERYONE)
Personality Types in the Population by Gender
Every country has their 20-25% STJ population that is proud of their history and believes all people of their ethnicity should think and behave similarly. There is also the 20-25% SFJ population that is proud of their culture and social customs. The 30-35% SPs are generally attached to the present day culture, while the SJs attach themselves to the history. For example, African-American SJs are proud of black history month and will talk about how they carry themselves with dignity and talk about the importance of building the black community. African-American SPs are often more interested in the present day and often affiliated with hip-hop culture. I've seen hilarious arguments between a ESTJ telling an ESTP that he needs to pull his pants up. Both are proud of their heritage for two different reasons.

Here in the United States, the African-American dual-cultures is prominent throughout a lot of the country. In the South, there are also predominantly white subcultures as the "Born Country" SJs, "Git-R-Done" SPs, & "Southern Gentlemen & Ladies" SJs. There are also many other subcultures, but the main thing I've noticed is the detachment of iNtuitive Thinker types.

I can't speak for NTJs, but us NTPs often seem out of place. Like we are universal in our approach. I believe this is a good thing, for us, as we can adapt to different cultures. I can pose as a Southern Gentleman, Born Country, or Git-R-Done guy. I believe this is because our sense of self-perception, Si, is inferior is probably doesn't manifest itself until much later in life. I tried on several different "cultural" hats.

My questions are
1) How thick is your accent compared to others? Also How flexible is it in terms of adapting to your surroundings? People in the South do not hear an accent from me while others do, but they say it isn't thick.

2. Do you find yourself adapting to SJ sub-cultures, SP sub-cultures, iNtuitive hipster sub-cultures, or are you some special ENTP who doesn't identify with anybody? I tend to identify more with SJ sub-cultures.

3. How much do you identify with your regional/national culture, as a whole? I am able to identify as a Southerner and as an American just fine. I like my SEC football team and I follow US Men's soccer. However, I believe I could transplant to almost anywhere in the world and adapt. It's like I'm silly putty or a chameleon.

Anyway, thought?
 
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1. How thick is your accent compared to others? Also How flexible is it in terms of adapting to your surroundings?
We don't have that many different accents, although I tend to speak quite fast and once had someone ask me how long I had lived here for and if it took me long to learn the language because "I could almost think you're a native speaker". Was mildly confused for a while.

2. Do you find yourself adapting to SJ sub-cultures, SP sub-cultures, iNtuitive hipster sub-cultures, or are you some special ENTP who doesn't identify with anybody?
Don't adapt to any subculture, I for example dress almost like you're expected to but not quite and this country is not the biggest fan of extraversion. Luckily people here don't like to express their emotions in general so I'm quite covered. Don't adapt to other NTs except for one person because most are boring and other ENTPs I've met don't like me (the feeling is mutual). Luckily I'm now in an environment where everyone is different, being in a normal school with people from the same background was a pain. I get along with all kinds of people as long as there is variation to choose from and they don't get on my nerves too much, although sometimes it can be a challenge to get them on my side as those who don't know me have in their own words hated me deeply until circumstances forced them to give me a chance. I guess that since I don't really adapt people either like me a lot or deeply dislike me, nowadays they tend to think more positively which wasn't always the case. My ENTJ father is of the opinion that I'll never find my place in the world though.

3. How much do you identify with your regional/national culture, as a whole?
I manage fine, I can get excited with others if we do win the ice hockey championship (although I have no idea what's going on atm) and after having to live a year abroad learned to appreciate it here. I easily identify with this specific area of the country but would hate it if I had to move any further from the centre of the capital than I live now. Socially I'm incapable of identifying with the stereotypical Finnish people. Despite having naturally light blonde hair people even told me that I look like I'm from somewhere else:)) Apparently it's because I'm short and my face doesn't fit in, I don't know or care. Many from my class thought I was something else than Finnish because my family doesn't live here until they learned through some misunderstandings.
 

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Birdie Borracho
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1. How thick is your accent compared to others? Also How flexible is it in terms of adapting to your surroundings?
We don't have that many different accents, although I tend to speak quite fast and once had someone ask me how long I had lived here for and if it took me long to learn the language because "I could almost think you're a native speaker". Was mildly confused for a while.

2. Do you find yourself adapting to SJ sub-cultures, SP sub-cultures, iNtuitive hipster sub-cultures, or are you some special ENTP who doesn't identify with anybody?
Don't adapt to any subculture, I for example dress almost like you're expected to but not quite and this country is not the biggest fan of extraversion. Luckily people here don't like to express their emotions in general so I'm quite covered. Don't adapt to other NTs except for one person because most are boring and other ENTPs I've met don't like me (the feeling is mutual). Luckily I'm now in an environment where everyone is different, being in a normal school with people from the same background was a pain. I get along with all kinds of people as long as there is variation to choose from and they don't get on my nerves too much, although sometimes it can be a challenge to get them on my side as those who don't know me have in their own words hated me deeply until circumstances forced them to give me a chance. I guess that since I don't really adapt people either like me a lot or deeply dislike me, nowadays they tend to think more positively which wasn't always the case. My ENTJ father is of the opinion that I'll never find my place in the world though.

3. How much do you identify with your regional/national culture, as a whole?
I manage fine, I can get excited with others if we do win the ice hockey championship (although I have no idea what's going on atm) and after having to live a year abroad learned to appreciate it here. I easily identify with this specific area of the country but would hate it if I had to move any further from the centre of the capital than I live now. Socially I'm incapable of identifying with the stereotypical Finnish people. Despite having naturally light blonde hair people even told me that I look like I'm from somewhere else:)) Apparently it's because I'm short and my face doesn't fit in, I don't know or care. Many from my class thought I was something else than Finnish because my family doesn't live here until they learned through some misunderstandings.
That's interesting. Social identity theory says people constantly categorize themselves from larger groups to small groups and identify rival groups. It's funny how over here, the average person lumps all of Europe, together; while some smarter people just think of Scandinavians in general. Basically, what's the difference between a Swede, a Finn, and a Dane? The answer is we don't care. Sure, I'm pretty cultured and I recognize that Finnish language is remarkably different from the rest of the North, but I couldn't actually tell you much about the culture except the 2 Finnish people I met were highly educated and spoke grammatically perfect English.

ENTJ father? I don't envy you.
 
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That's interesting. Social identity theory says people constantly categorize themselves from larger groups to small groups and identify rival groups. It's funny how over here, the average person lumps all of Europe, together; while some smarter people just think of Scandinavians in general. Basically, what's the difference between a Swede, a Finn, and a Dane? The answer is we don't care. Sure, I'm pretty cultured and I recognize that Finnish language is remarkably different from the rest of the North, but I couldn't actually tell you much about the culture except the 2 Finnish people I met were highly educated and spoke grammatically perfect English.

ENTJ father? I don't envy you.
True, I think we only care of those differences that immediately affect our own lives or that are observable without any extra effort.

Wise choice, I'm of the opinion that an ENTJ father and an ENTP daughter isn't too ideal of a combination:D
 

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My questions are
1) How thick is your accent compared to others? Also How flexible is it in terms of adapting to your surroundings?
Well... I can do Yorkshire, Cornwall, Devon, Newcastle, Suffolk, London, Cockney, RP, Shields, Liverpool, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Glaswegian, Highlander, Islander, North Irish, Dublin, SouthUS, Californian, Washington, New York, Italian, Afrikaan, French, Turkish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Danish, Polish, Russian, Aussie, Indian, Pakistani, New Zealand, etc etc etc etc etc :p you get the point.

Which I use depends on my mood. I also frequently change my tone.

2. Do you find yourself adapting to SJ sub-cultures, SP sub-cultures, iNtuitive hipster sub-cultures, or are you some special ENTP who doesn't identify with anybody?
Usually when people ask me to choose sides, the answer I give would be; "I choose my side."
To be honest I can be a part of both, I lived in an intuitive dominated population in my childhood. Now I'm more a part of the SJ subculture, but I can say I like the N version more. I wouldnt really call it hipster though.

3. How much do you identify with your regional/national culture, as a whole?
0%
 

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Birdie Borracho
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My questions are
3. How much do you identify with your regional/national culture, as a whole?
0%
Shouldn't being white count towards at least 2%? After all, you can identify just by kind of looking similar to everyone else. Also, you speak English so maybe another 3%? Come on, don't completely give up.
 

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Shouldn't being white count towards at least 2%? After all, you can identify just by kind of looking similar to everyone else. Also, you speak English so maybe another 3%? Come on, don't completely give up.
My mother tongue isnt english,
And people actually tell me that I dont look like "where I'm from".
Which I take as a compliment :)
 
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1) How thick is your accent compared to others? Also How flexible is it in terms of adapting to your surroundings?

2. Do you find yourself adapting to SJ sub-cultures, SP sub-cultures, iNtuitive hipster sub-cultures, or are you some special ENTP who doesn't identify with anybody?

3. How much do you identify with your regional/national culture, as a whole?
Well, I'm a German who has lived in the Netherlands for all of my life so...

1) Some people can hear that I'm from the north in both of my languages (my family comes from north-east Germany, so that's the kind of German I've learned at home.) I speak pretty standard German and Dutch though, with just a few local words and expressions thrown in that I like. I'm very flexible in what language I use and what words I use to express myself. If I'm speaking to someone who is from where I am from, I will use local words and expressions, if the person I speak to is from another part of the country I won't use them. I don't change my accent because I don't have much of an accent to begin with. I learned Dutch at school and by talking to people around me, we didn't speak the local dialect at home because we were talking German. And we talked standard German at home, so...

2) I find history more important than conserving customs. I think that we should just stop painting Pete black if some people are upset about it, and stain him liberally with soot to make clear the he is unrecognizable because he goes through the chimney. I wouldn't immediately call that SJ though. I always go to the memorial on the fourth of may, and feel awkward. I think that's important, to remind yourself that people telling you that something is good doesn't make it so. I don't know what I am. I get on with SP's in general, with NP's and SJ's as well. NJ's... less so. They worry too much for my liking, they see dangers everywhere that just aren't there. Important is that the other person knows and accepts that different people think differently.

3) When someone asks me where I'm from, I quickly think about how deep I want to go into it. If it's another Dutch person, I will name my city (Groningen.) If it's someone in my city, I will name the village where my parents live. If I feel like we could talk about it longer, I explain that I grew up in the Netherlands, but have a German nationality. If someone asks me for my nationality, I answer German. I am a German. I feel German. However, I am also someone who grew up in Drenthe and lives in Groningen, so I identify as a North-Eastener as well, I'm from the 'veenkolonien', (turf colonies). Willem-Alexander is my king, Angela Merkel is my chancellor. It's complicated, these feelings. I identify with this parts of the Netherlands locally, but my country is Germany. At the world cup, I was glad that Germany won, but I would have liked it even more if the Netherlands would have made it to the final also.

If we just got the old Frisian state back together it would be much easier.

Despite all this, geography isn't the most important part of my identity. Languages, customs are nice, but much more important are shared ideas, and those transcend borders.
 

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Gonna start out by mentioning that I'm from Southeast Texas. In addition to the whole "Southern US culture" thing, I'm also Cajun (for those of you who don't know, basically the French/Native American/sometimes Afro culture from Louisiana)


1) How thick is your accent compared to others? I used to think my accent wasn't thick (in comparison to others), then I took a trip to the Northeast US. Dear god, I could hear another southerner from a mile away. I don't really have the slow paced "southern drawl" that people think of. Instead we talk kinda fast, and the french-ness will pop out if I'm talking with my family.

2. Do you find yourself adapting to SJ sub-cultures, SP sub-cultures, iNtuitive hipster sub-cultures, or are you some special ENTP who doesn't identify with anybody? It depends. I've learned to adapt and fit in just about anywhere. Sometimes it takes some social gymnastics, but I'm flexible so it works :wink: I've also learned to "choose my battles" when it comes to arguing. That's definitely something ENTPs should learn to do in any culture.

3. How much do you identify with your regional/national culture, as a whole? This also depends. As a whole, Cajuns tend to be friendly, argumentative, and boisterous, so that suits me well. They're also fond of parties (think Mardi Gras), have a taste for good food and drink, and can be indulgent. I really enjoy this about my culture. It's fun, I'm actually good friends with most of my first cousins, aunts, and uncles. They're people I talk to on a weekly basis.

Growing up, my mom taught me manners, how to dress appropriately, how to set a table, send thank you notes etc. As a kid, I hated that stuff. Thought it was stupid. Now as an adult, I use it to my advantage because it impresses people. You'd be surprised at what looking nice, formality, and a bit of small talk can get you.

On the contrary, it's a very traditional culture. I don't do the whole "God 'n Guns" religious thing. I don't like the pettiness (had a second cousin de-friend nearly all of my first cousins on facebook because a wedding invitation got lost in the mail. seriously.) Some of the older folks tend to be racist, which is ironic because most of our traditional food has African and Native American roots (this comes from the side of my family that basically whitewashed themselves, tho). Obviously I don't support this either. Socially, I'm pretty liberal. I think it's also worth noting that my family doesn't know I'm bisexual, bust mostly everyone in the small town I live in right now does, and that hasn't been a problem.

Basically, I've found that I can use my Fe to play the whole SJ game and entertain myself. I've noticed that my family is more SJ-ish than my friends, but I run around with a lot of musicians and artists. Now, I know this was mostly about my family, rather than my actual friends and stuff, but a lot of my friends are from different places so I'm around a lot of different cultures.
 

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1) It took a long time to get a slight accent. I hate those snobberies.
2) I am culture-proof. Making sense is my drive. No really, I can't adapt at all. SI, TE, FE and SE behaviors irritate me, can't help it. Only a few NPs don't use them at all, 5% of humanity at best I'd say. No, probably less, 3% at best, and I'm optimistic.
3) My country is a mix of the Shire and the Vogsphere.
 

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Birdie Borracho
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
@stultum that was very interesting to read. I know the differences between Dutch and Deutsche, linguistically, although I couldn't tell you much, culturally. People complain about racism, here in America, but the fact that we've settled on White, Black, Mexican, Asian, Arab, and Indian is progress, in a weird way. Those of German descent are throughout the whole country with higher percentages in the Midwest and Texas. I had to look up the May 4th thing, and it sounds like our Memorial Day. I, too, rooted for Germany as they are my second favorite team. I love their style of play, specifically because they aren't as prone to theatrics. As an American, I do not focus huge amounts of time watching soccer, although it is my 2nd favorite sport, behind American Football. Quick question, to me, it seems there is a cultural divide on who takes "dives" and plays the ref. In my opinion, Romantic language countries like France, Spain, Italy and Portugal, as well as Latin American loves to act out. Africans and hit and miss, Middle Easterners are cry babies, and Germanic, Slavic, and Oriental players generally just playing. It depends on individual players, but I'm curious if there is a perceived cultural perception.

If we just got the old Frisian state back together it would be much easier.
Despite all this, geography isn't the most important part of my identity. Languages, customs are nice, but much more important are shared ideas, and those transcend borders.
Is there a real movement for this? Like to create an Independent Frisian state or to incorporate Frisia as a state of Germany? The last part is very much the ENTP in you. I believe I have just as much in common with the ENTPs on this forum as I do with people I grew up with. I met an ESFP from Norway, the other day, and I had very little in common with her. I could appreciate she had a great body from years of playing soccer, though haha. Sex is universal, after all, and I there are good looking people from every country.
 

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1) How thick is your accent compared to others? Also How flexible is it in terms of adapting to your surroundings? People in the South do not hear an accent from me while others do, but they say it isn't thick.

I don't really have an accent, I don't think. Sometimes I blurt southern sounding words but it's extremely rare. I think I adapt my personality more to my surroundings than my accent. I think people who change their accent are pretty funny and naive.

2. Do you find yourself adapting to SJ sub-cultures, SP sub-cultures, iNtuitive hipster sub-cultures, or are you some special ENTP who doesn't identify with anybody? I tend to identify more with SJ sub-cultures.

I used to be what you would call a gamer, but in general I don't feel a need to actively identify with any subculture. One interesting thing I hear out of people who have a certain subculture is that people "need to be free to be themselves." I think it's one of the more ironic things I hear.

3. How much do you identify with your regional/national culture, as a whole? I am able to identify as a Southerner and as an American just fine. I like my SEC football team and I follow US Men's soccer. However, I believe I could transplant to almost anywhere in the world and adapt. It's like I'm silly putty or a chameleon.

If someone asked me who I was in my culture, I'd probably say that I'm a product of upper middle class idealistic/democratic environments more than anything. Next to that, my country of origin is obviously a big factor.

I used to follow sports and I still feel a bit of concern for how my hometown's college basketball team is doing. My teams still feel like "mine" even though when I am around actual fans I have trouble talking to them about it.

I think I'd be pretty adaptable to, I move a lot. Actually, I'd really like to travel just to be able to do it. Living in new places is usually a juicy info download until you get used to it.
 

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[MENTION=142354]Is there a real movement for this? Like to create an Independent Frisian state or to incorporate Frisia as a state of Germany? The last part is very much the ENTP in you. I believe I have just as much in common with the ENTPs on this forum as I do with people I grew up with. I met an ESFP from Norway, the other day, and I had very little in common with her. I could appreciate she had a great body from years of playing soccer, though haha. Sex is universal, after all, and I there are good looking people from every country.
No, it's far to long ago that it was one unified cultural area, and even longer ago that they weren't ruled by other kingdoms and bishops.

There's a bit of an 'Independent Frisia' movement in the Dutch province of Frisia (compare catalonia) but it isn't taken very seriously by most. By far most Frisians are fine with being Dutch. Most other parts of what once was Frisia now have other names. What remains is a set of dialects, a tendency to give kids names that end on -ke and a stoic attitude.
 

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Birdie Borracho
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
@DeductiveReasoner You're not too far from me, in regards to the globe, haha. TN, where I am, is pretty homogenous with the rest of the South, although Cajun culture is definitely a sub-culture.

I used to think my accent wasn't thick (in comparison to others), then I took a trip to the Northeast US. Dear god, I could hear another southerner from a mile away. I don't really have the slow paced "southern drawl" that people think of. Instead we talk kinda fast, and the french-ness will pop out if I'm talking with my family.
Water Boy comes to mind when I think Cajun, haha.

Growing up, my mom taught me manners, how to dress appropriately, how to set a table, send thank you notes etc. As a kid, I hated that stuff. Thought it was stupid. Now as an adult, I use it to my advantage because it impresses people. You'd be surprised at what looking nice, formality, and a bit of small talk can get you.
That is sooooo Southern SJ. My mom is an ISFJ, step-dad ESTJ and they taught me the same things. I don't do it, though, because I don't care. Although I can't disagree on impressions.

On the contrary, it's a very traditional culture. I don't do the whole "God 'n Guns" religious thing. I don't like the pettiness (had a second cousin de-friend nearly all of my first cousins on facebook because a wedding invitation got lost in the mail. seriously.) Some of the older folks tend to be racist, which is ironic because most of our traditional food has African and Native American roots (this comes from the side of my family that basically whitewashed themselves, tho). Obviously I don't support this either. Socially, I'm pretty liberal. I think it's also worth noting that my family doesn't know I'm bisexual, bust mostly everyone in the small town I live in right now does, and that hasn't been a problem.
I love that first sentence. Not trying to mock you but every culture is a traditional culture because SJs make up a significant population everywhere and the SPs mimic the current culture, which is based on tradition. A place like San Francisco is liberal now and the SJs are liberal because it is now traditionally liberal. When I read studies that most people tend to have similar views as their parents, I immediately think SJs, but clearly we aren't immune to it either. Hell, I'm neutral on LGBT rights, and I'd say that's a 'win' for that community considering the traditional Baptist world I was brought up in. I understand, though, how that can be frustrating. ENTPs do not like being judged, on a transcendental level, but at least you seem content about where you live now.
@Tzara, I probably look more stereo-typically British than you, haha. I'd invite you to change places, but most white people in the South are Scot-Irish and English so that wouldn't fix anything.
@IDontThinkSo that added nothing. Can you offer any analysis about where you currently live?
 
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@Tzara, I probably look more stereo-typically British than you, haha. I'd invite you to change places, but most white people in the South are Scot-Irish and English so that wouldn't fix anything.
I live in helsinki :p Thanks though :proud:
 

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I
My questions are
1) How thick is your accent compared to others? Also How flexible is it in terms of adapting to your surroundings? People in the South do not hear an accent from me while others do, but they say it isn't thick.
Extremely random, I've emulated too many accents and... I can't tell which ones I'm using to the point that it might actually tel where I got the words from.
2. Do you find yourself adapting to SJ sub-cultures, SP sub-cultures, iNtuitive hipster sub-cultures, or are you some special ENTP who doesn't identify with anybody? I tend to identify more with SJ sub-cultures.
I identify with everyone, but apparently that's a big no-no.
3. How much do you identify with your regional/national culture, as a whole? I am able to identify as a Southerner and as an American just fine. I like my SEC football team and I follow US Men's soccer. However, I believe I could transplant to almost anywhere in the world and adapt. It's like I'm silly putty or a chameleon.
Nothing culturally though. Moved to the U.S. when I was 8 from Phillippines, never paid attention to culture there too though.

Anyway, thought?
Is bacon just meat french fries?
 

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1. How thick is your accent compared to others? Also How flexible is it in terms of adapting to your surroundings?

I too am a Southern, however, Asian-American, I sound like a Southerner, but sometimes a little Asian accent pops up. I'm very adaptive mainly because I don't associate myself with other Asians, I can't relate to them. I grew up around White and Black Southerners. My taste in things are a mix match of everything.

2. Do you find yourself adapting to SJ sub-cultures, SP sub-cultures, iNtuitive hipster sub-cultures, or are you some special ENTP who doesn't identify with anybody?

I know how to be fashionable and blend in, but most of the time I don't care how I dress depending on the situation. I dress in what I feel comfortable in. I think I am able to easily adapt to other subcultures.

3. How much do you identify with your regional/national culture, as a whole?

I am in-tuned to the Southern American culture, mainly cooking and food. As a Southerner, cooking is a very large part of our culture. I also able to blend in Asian cooking with Southern and American in general. I'm also fairly polite, but sometimes I just say F it to cultural norms of politeness as a Southerner, where I live, the native Southerners are losing to the Northern transplants. Northerners are moving in like crazy.
 

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Birdie Borracho
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
1. How thick is your accent compared to others? Also How flexible is it in terms of adapting to your surroundings?

I too am a Southern, however, Asian-American, I sound like a Southerner, but sometimes a little Asian accent pops up. I'm very adaptive mainly because I don't associate myself with other Asians, I can't relate to them. I grew up around White and Black Southerners. My taste in things are a mix match of everything.

2. Do you find yourself adapting to SJ sub-cultures, SP sub-cultures, iNtuitive hipster sub-cultures, or are you some special ENTP who doesn't identify with anybody?

I know how to be fashionable and blend in, but most of the time I don't care how I dress depending on the situation. I dress in what I feel comfortable in. I think I am able to easily adapt to other subcultures.

3. How much do you identify with your regional/national culture, as a whole?

I am in-tuned to the Southern American culture, mainly cooking and food. As a Southerner, cooking is a very large part of our culture. I also able to blend in Asian cooking with Southern and American in general. I'm also fairly polite, but sometimes I just say F it to cultural norms of politeness as a Southerner, where I live, the native Southerners are losing to the Northern transplants. Northerners are moving in like crazy.
From your typing you still sound like English is your second language. Welcome to the South, anyway. People all the time, city to city. Rural areas usually stay pretty consistent. Fried chicken and fried rice sounds like a dish I'd love to try.
@Tzara I saw the born in country. Assuming your a Scotsman in Helsinki, were your answers based on how much you relate to the Finnish people. If so, how much do you identify as a Scotsman. I'm originally from Florida, but I identify more a Southerner, culturally. The exception is all my favorite sports teams are in Florida.
@aef8234 As usual, you contribute nothing, yet I'm always ok with that.
 

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I identify actively with universalism. In the tradition of Diogenes or Giordano Bruno. I ask myself "Would this still be true?" if the context was changed for example + or - 1000, 10,000, 1,000,000, or 1 x 10^9 years, if the gender was changed, if the planet was changed, etc. I think there are certain things that bind us universally. I am not interested in the particular instance unless it is a moment or a person to love.
 

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@Tzara I saw the born in country. Assuming your a Scotsman in Helsinki, were your answers based on how much you relate to the Finnish people. If so, how much do you identify as a Scotsman. I'm originally from Florida, but I identify more a Southerner, culturally. The exception is all my favorite sports teams are in Florida.
I'm part scottish. Its the part I identify the most with. So I use a scottish banner.

Nah I've been living in finland for 6 months now :p I'm not Finnish ^^
Those were related to the country I was born in.

(keeps being very vague :p)
 
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