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One thing I love about this group is how international we are - while native English speaking members are most common, due to this being an English-language group, we have many from many other countries, and despite cultural differences (which I see as mostly superficial, if interesting), I do feel our mutual interest in MBTI and where it applies type similarity cuts through that.

Still, there are many other factors that contribute to or define a person's personality other than cognitive functions (I believe) or enneagram, socionics, big 5, whatever else. Things like your family upbringing, the society and culture you grew up in, social group, various events. I'm interested to what extent do you think your culture has moulded you, especially if it's made you a little 'less' typically like your type, if there's such a thing, or if it has much at all.
Living in urban Australia I think we enjoy more of a freedom to 'be who we are' (whatever our essence is), yet I think there are still noticeable differences between Australian culture and say, American, British, let alone others. I think Australians tend to be a bit less politically correct than Americans or Brits (although we are increasingly), and especially if you're in a certain circle (let's say you work in a blue-collar trade) I think you sometimes have to develop a bit of a thick skin. 'Taking the piss' is a common thing here, not that it's uniquely Australian. I think if you could give typical Australian culture a 'type', ESTP or ESTJ might be it. In that sense, I wonder if being Australian has given me an 'ESTx' edge, if you know what I mean. What do you think?
 

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Interesting thread! I live in Sweden so naturally I don't know as much about what it's like to live in Australia as you do, but I could perhaps mention that the people I've met (online) from Australia have been N's (INTP, INFJ and xNFP). It could just be because these types are more common on the internet, though, probably not very representative of Australia as a whole.

In Sweden I think that most people are ESFJs (I have no idea why but every other person who takes the test seems to get ESFJ, regardless of gender). ESFP and ISFJ also seem to be pretty common. There's also people I don't know whether they've taken any tests or not, and many of them seem ISTJ/ESTJ.

People in my surroundings seem to be mainly ENFJ and ENFP, mostly, but these are people I've chosen to hang out with, so that there'd be a bias in that circle isn't exactly surprising.

Regardless, it seems like there's very many extroverts around. Probably because our Americanized culture is promoting extrovertedness, if you don't list at least 80% of an extrovert's traits in a job application, you're pretty much screwed. Even our curriculums promote extrovertedness nowadays (the culture in our schools is leaning more towards presentations in front of the whole class, debating and putting it upon the individual to make sure he/she is being heard - or their grades will suffer). This makes me think it might be possible that some people who are in fact introverts don't recognize it, because they've been raised to fit into an extroverted culture.

I should perhaps also add that Sweden has historically been known for having a pretty introverted culture, but there's been a change since perhaps the 80s (this was pretty much when American entertainment made its greatest entrance into our culture). This has had some very interesting effects, where most people are (at least according to themselves) extroverted, but they still stay as far away from each other in public spaces as possible. When you see people riding the bus, or sitting at a park bench, you'd think most of them had social anxieties, but when you see them partying you'd think they were all on aphrodisiac and extasy at the same time. It looks hilarious. Our culture basically took "lack of personal integrity" and "shallowness" from the extroverted American culture but skipped "open-mindedness" and "friendliness towards strangers". Cheers for picking the bad parts while ignoring the good ones :p

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My culture depresses me. :(
 

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I mostly agree with that ESTx assessment of Australian culture, although I find that people generally expect F-associated demeanour and behaviour in women, probably given the population tendency that way. And in my preferred circles (and young people/academia in general) there's a bit more of a tendency towards intuitive introverts.

I know in my dad's strict, old-school family, men were expected to be ESTJs and women were expected to be xSFJs, although my ISFJ mum didn't fit in with it very well because part of that, for them, was the expectation of women to be quiet servers of men, and she was just way too intelligent and independent to fit into that. My dad himself came out a dysfunctional ISTJ.

If I had to compare the culture I know to somewhere completely different, I'd say my experiences of southern California were of a much stronger ExFJ vibe.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Interesting thread! I live in Sweden so naturally I don't know as much about what it's like to live in Australia as you do, but I could perhaps mention that the people I've met (online) from Australia have been N's (INTP, INFJ and xNFP). It could just be because these types are more common on the internet, though, probably not very representative of Australia as a whole.

In Sweden I think that most people are ESFJs (I have no idea why but every other person who takes the test seems to get ESFJ, regardless of gender). ESFP and ISFJ also seem to be pretty common. There's also people I don't know whether they've taken any tests or not, and many of them seem ISTJ/ESTJ.

People in my surroundings seem to be mainly ENFJ and ENFP, mostly, but these are people I've chosen to hang out with, so that there'd be a bias in that circle isn't exactly surprising.

Regardless, it seems like there's very many extroverts around. Probably because our Americanized culture is promoting extrovertedness, if you don't list at least 80% of an extrovert's traits in a job application, you're pretty much screwed. Even our curriculums promote extrovertedness nowadays (the culture in our schools is leaning more towards presentations in front of the whole class, debating and putting it upon the individual to make sure he/she is being heard - or their grades will suffer). This makes me think it might be possible that some people who are in fact introverts don't recognize it, because they've been raised to fit into an extroverted culture.

I should perhaps also add that Sweden has historically been known for having a pretty introverted culture, but there's been a change since perhaps the 80s (this was pretty much when American entertainment made its greatest entrance into our culture). This has had some very interesting effects, where most people are (at least according to themselves) extroverted, but they still stay as far away from each other in public spaces as possible. When you see people riding the bus, or sitting at a park bench, you'd think most of them had social anxieties, but when you see them partying you'd think they were all on aphrodisiac and extasy at the same time. It looks hilarious. Our culture basically took "lack of personal integrity" and "shallowness" from the extroverted American culture but skipped "open-mindedness" and "friendliness towards strangers". Cheers for picking the bad parts while ignoring the good ones :p

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How interesting. Yes, I think of Sweden as very reserved and introverted. I haven't met many Swedes, a few here, and most were pretty quiet, and not very expressive, like say South Americans or Southern Europeans, some of whom have been SUPER extroverted lol. I had a classmate who spent a year living in Sweden, and she said it was almost unheard of for strangers to talk to each other on the bus.etc, moreso than here. But what you say is interesting...I think Northern Europeans are a bit more matter of fact, pragmatic, stoic, but a lot of them do like to party. Maybe work hard and play hard?

Yeah it's definitely more just because they are drawn to the MBTI community. The dominant culture here is hardly very intuitive.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I mostly agree with that ESTx assessment of Australian culture, although I find that people generally expect F-associated demeanour and behaviour in women, probably given the population tendency that way. And in my preferred circles (and young people/academia in general) there's a bit more of a tendency towards intuitive introverts.

I know in my dad's strict, old-school family, men were expected to be ESTJs and women were expected to be xSFJs, although my ISFJ mum didn't fit in with it very well because part of that, for them, was the expectation of women to be quiet servers of men, and she was just way too intelligent and independent to fit into that. My dad himself came out a dysfunctional ISTJ.

If I had to compare the culture I know to somewhere completely different, I'd say my experiences of southern California were of a much stronger ExFJ vibe.
That's true, I think Australian culture/society - especially mainstream - can be very gendered...blokey blokes and girly girls, with a lot of girls being sort of over the top with their Fe type expressiveness. In a sense we're culturally in between the US and UK. I've noticed Northern European women are less that way. Less fake friendly and ditzy, as a general rule.

I'd say yeah, the typical hard-working 'Aussie battler' would be an ISTJ.
 

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@The Nameless Composer - I think it's because so many of them are ESFs (I'm sorry ESFs!) that they're easily pushed into a sort of main stream way of behaving. If the general consensus is that one shouldn't talk to strangers, they won't. If the general consensus is that one should go out and get drunk 4 nights a week, they will. They don't really question much. At least not the ones I know, I hate to say it and I know it's offensive, but that is what the ESFs I know are like...

There might also be a difference between generations - people born before 1990 seem to have more of a work-hard attitude, while those born after 1990... Nope, just party-hard.

About us being stoic and pragmatic - these winters would make anyone stoic and pragmatic, haha, you have to be to survive!

But it's interesting that the view of Northern Europeans is so different in different countries... All the Japanese people I've met who have been to Sweden have seemed to like our culture, although they seem a bit more caring in Japan (I've been there as an exchange student and had a Japanese girl live with my family as an exchange student). Other Europeans seem to think of Northern Europeans as, pretty much how you put it, pragmatic, down-to-earth, not very "fiery" and so on.

While people in Spain (where a lot of Northern Europeans go for holidays) seem to think Swedes are lazy freeloaders who get cash for nothing, then go to their country (Spain) and throw their trash around, vomiting everywhere, not contributing at all. Lazy and spoiled, to put it shortly.
 

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@The Nameless Composer - I think it's because so many of them are ESFs (I'm sorry ESFs!) that they're easily pushed into a sort of main stream way of behaving. If the general consensus is that one shouldn't talk to strangers, they won't. If the general consensus is that one should go out and get drunk 4 nights a week, they will. They don't really question much. At least not the ones I know, I hate to say it and I know it's offensive, but that is what the ESFs I know are like...

There might also be a difference between generations - people born before 1990 seem to have more of a work-hard attitude, while those born after 1990... Nope, just party-hard.

About us being stoic and pragmatic - these winters would make anyone stoic and pragmatic, haha, you have to be to survive!

But it's interesting that the view of Northern Europeans is so different in different countries... All the Japanese people I've met who have been to Sweden have seemed to like our culture, although they seem a bit more caring in Japan (I've been there as an exchange student and had a Japanese girl live with my family as an exchange student). Other Europeans seem to think of Northern Europeans as, pretty much how you put it, pragmatic, down-to-earth, not very "fiery" and so on.

While people in Spain (where a lot of Northern Europeans go for holidays) seem to think Swedes are lazy freeloaders who get cash for nothing, then go to their country (Spain) and throw their trash around, vomiting everywhere, not contributing at all. Lazy and spoiled, to put it shortly.
So many Swedes are ESFx? Interesting, I would expect ISTJ to be the typical Swede, or the typical Germanic person, but those are stereotypes, of course. If type is mostly innate, one should find the full array of 16 types there in fair numbers.

Yeah there's this idea that young people don't wanna work hard, want everything handed to them...maybe there's some truth to that, but I feel it's a bit of a generalisation.

Yes, I think since in colder climates people spent more time at home and not outside mingling with people, it's theorised people in colder climates are more private, reserved, less sociable than those in warmer climates, and in my experience that is true. The UK tends to be more reserved than Australia or the US, Japan more than Indonesia, but there are other causes of course.

I've been to Japan and have met many Japanese here, so I'm pretty familiar...yeah, in some ways Japan does fit the stereotypes. It's like as you describe Sweden to be, can be quite conformist, yet it has a really quirky side, and some Japanese people are like really extroverted. Japanese I've met have been pretty friendly, but there is that sense of privacy one often encounters among Northern Europeans.

Sounds like the reputation Brits have. Swedes always seem more well-behaved, but maybe a lot aren't haha.
 

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@The Nameless Composer - It seems like it, I've done some vague research and the vast majority of my acquaintances are ESFs, the whole crew at my fiances working place (and they're a bit more than a 100 people) are ESFs with a tiny exception of a few ENFPs, 1 ISTJ and 1 ESTJ, most of his acquaintances outside of work seem to be ESFs... And at the hospital in his home town many of the employees took the test as a part of some project, and there a lot of the nurses and doctors were ESFJs (with ESFP being a bit more common among the nurses). Maybe we're just unlucky and happened to end up in a place where everyone's an ESF (both in working places and apparently every other social space around us), or maybe everyone who takes the test just want to be like "everybody else", but it'd still be weird that everyone would want to be an ESF. Not that there's anything wrong with ESFs, it's just that it feels a bit overwhelming if they're really everywhere...

But I agree that the typical image of Swedes would be that they're the ISTJ type. I wonder where all the ISTJs are hiding, they've got to be out there somewhere, right?

And I think that reputation that apparently both Brits and Swedes have further south on the continent might be because generally people seem to behave less well when away from home... Tourits *shakes head*.
 

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[MENTION=160394]It seems like it, I've done some vague research and the vast majority of my acquaintances are ESFs, the whole crew at my fiances working place (and they're a bit more than a 100 people) are ESFs with a tiny exception of a few ENFPs, 1 ISTJ and 1 ESTJ, most of his acquaintances outside of work seem to be ESFs... And at the hospital in his home town many of the employees took the test as a part of some project, and there a lot of the nurses and doctors were ESFJs (with ESFP being a bit more common among the nurses). Maybe we're just unlucky and happened to end up in a place where everyone's an ESF (both in working places and apparently every other social space around us), or maybe everyone who takes the test just want to be like "everybody else", but it'd still be weird that everyone would want to be an ESF. Not that there's anything wrong with ESFs, it's just that it feels a bit overwhelming if they're really everywhere...
That's really interesting, since it looks like a very strong trend. I'm wondering how far you've taken into account that certain workplaces, jobs and industries will attract more people of a particular type?
 

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That's really interesting, since it looks like a very strong trend. I'm wondering how far you've taken into account that certain workplaces, jobs and industries will attract more people of a particular type?
I have been thinking about it, and as for my fiances workplace - it does make sense for most of the employees to be ESFJ as he's working in a school (for ESFJs to work with children doesn't seem very surprising, somehow). However, like I said many people around us who don't work there also test as ESFs, and they're working in various positions such as doctors, nurses, storemen (working in a warehouse), telemarketing, broadband/fiber-installation, priests, psychologists, teachers, dentists, cleaning services, social workers, and there's even one who works with programming (this was perhaps the one I least expected to test as ESF). However, one thing that most of these places have in common is that they're all - to some extent - working with people, but some of them are a of course a bit less about human interaction than others.

It kind of seems like ESFs (especially ESFJs) have a kind of "allround" way of working, that works pretty well almost anywhere.
 

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@The Nameless Composer - It seems like it, I've done some vague research and the vast majority of my acquaintances are ESFs, the whole crew at my fiances working place (and they're a bit more than a 100 people) are ESFs with a tiny exception of a few ENFPs, 1 ISTJ and 1 ESTJ, most of his acquaintances outside of work seem to be ESFs... And at the hospital in his home town many of the employees took the test as a part of some project, and there a lot of the nurses and doctors were ESFJs (with ESFP being a bit more common among the nurses). Maybe we're just unlucky and happened to end up in a place where everyone's an ESF (both in working places and apparently every other social space around us), or maybe everyone who takes the test just want to be like "everybody else", but it'd still be weird that everyone would want to be an ESF. Not that there's anything wrong with ESFs, it's just that it feels a bit overwhelming if they're really everywhere...

But I agree that the typical image of Swedes would be that they're the ISTJ type. I wonder where all the ISTJs are hiding, they've got to be out there somewhere, right?

And I think that reputation that apparently both Brits and Swedes have further south on the continent might be because generally people seem to behave less well when away from home... Tourits *shakes head*.
Is this just based on your guesses, though? How many have been properly typed? It's probably just the people you know/work with, I doubt most people in Sweden (or any country) are ESFP/ESFJ, even though it is one of the most common type (15-18% most estimates say). ESFP is less common, but still pretty common.

Still, it seems the British have a particularly bad reputation among Europeans, both in the North/South/East/West.
 

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It's not just guesses, the majority of those who work there (where my ENFP is working) have taken some MBTI-test themselves (although I do not know which one or how they did it - and my ENFP is too scatter brained to find out or to remember which one it was). It was only a few who haven't done it, or who were unwilling to talk about it (amongst which was the one my fiance is certain is an ISTJ). Mind that I'm not working there and I've only met them sporadically, which is why I'm basing all this on what my ENFP has told me.

I also think I wrote in my reply to @Exquisitor that the weird thing is that so many of our acquaintances outside of this working place (which is a school) are ESFs as well, and that these people work in all different kinds of professions (although most of them involve working with people). And these too have taken different MBTI-tests themselves, so it's not me typing them. They've typed themselves using some MBTI-test online. I know a few of them have used the one at 16personalities.com, while others have used a test in Swedish at personlighetstyp.se.

What I think could be behind it is -like I said- that we seem to randomly have ended up in a place (town and social circle) where loads of people are ESFs. Or, that these people didn't "take the test properly". My guess is that they've just taken the test and answered accordingly to how they think they should answer, without really considering neither the questions nor the theory properly. Perhaps their answers were also affected by the fact that the test was (in the workplace-related test situations) done in a work related setting (I suppose they would want to fit into their respective professions by answering what they think would be most suitable for whatever profession they have).

And, out of all of these who've taken the test themselves (be it at work or at home), I'm guessing that only a handful have actually read up on it to see what it's really about. But that really is just a guess. And I know that online tests aren't great, but either way it's not just me who's guessing, they have (despite their methods perhaps not being great) typed themselves :)
 

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Well, being a patently unassertive, introverted feeler American ain't the easiest thing in the world. And according to America's Mood Map: Find Which State Matches Your Personality Wisconsin, my state, is the most extroverted. Yikes. I actually think I'd make a good Canadian; Canada isn't too far away from my family and it's cold, which I actually like.
 

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Cool thread, really enjoyed everyone's insights. Regarding to myself I think my culture makes me act more introverted, I live in Brazil, the general vibe here is really laid back specially in school and college, of course there are some places and cities where work prevails but generally speaking the country is ExFP most definitely, and Fi users in general, that makes me seem a little more introverted and cold, I believe many people perceive me as INTJ like, I'm kind of a focused ENTP... but is really that at least at my currently environment the general talk is about parties and people, which I like, but the lack of a more meaningful conversation exists on my day to day, meeting a career focused person is really valued by me because of so few I meet, anyway, I think maybe this have more to do with age, here we don't generally have that posture about our future as I imagine North America have, I was surely slackier at high school due to this position I guess.
 

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I'm a southerner, and I think we're simultaneously xSFJ and xSTP, if that makes any sense. The United States as a whole is probably ESTJ. Traditional (Si), an absolute machine of Te, and actually pretty innovative (Ne), but there's definitely a shadow of ESTP. I saw someone from the UK on here mention that very stereotypical SPs (and percievers in general) seem to be held in a better light in The United States. No idea if that's true or not.
 

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Aggressive ESTP types are something of an American ideal, I'd agree with that. You have to be ambitious with a take no prisoners attitude, and have a seize the moment mentality. It's all about keeping score (money) and crushing "losers" without mercy. I'd say this sums up my area of the USA's values.
 
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