Personality Cafe banner

1 - 20 of 125 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,486 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Post interesting research articles and papers here.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cari Knip

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,486 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Top performers are not the most impressive when extreme performance indicates unreliability

Abstract

The relationship between performance and ability is a central concern in the social sciences: Are the most successful much more able than others, and are failures unskilled? Prior research has shown that noise and self-reinforcing dynamics make performance unpredictable and lead to a weak association between ability and performance. Here we show that the same mechanisms that generate unpredictability imply that extreme performances can be relatively uninformative about ability.

As a result, the highest performers may not have the highest expected ability and should not be imitated or praised. We show that whether higher performance indicates higher ability depends on whether extreme performance could be achieved by skill or requires luck.



Top performers are not the most impressive when extreme performance indicates unreliability
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,486 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
What defines define?

Google definition:

in·ter·est·ing adjective /ˈint(ə)ristiNG/ /ˈintəˌrestiNG/ Arousing curiosity or interest; holding or catching the attention.

INTP definition:

in·ter·est·ing adjective /ˈint(ə)ristiNG/ /ˈintəˌrestiNG/ Almost everything / anything.
 

·
黐線 ~Chiseen~
Joined
·
5,240 Posts
back in my college days, I came across an article in the schools newspaper.

it was research on how male perspiration messes with a females mind in certain situations. It could have been this link or related to this link

Pheromones in Male Perspiration Reduce Women's Tension, Alter Hormone Response that Regulates Menstrual Cycle | Penn News

for a brief moment in time, i had a pique of curiosity of how this research played out.

sadly, after googling 'perspiration + pheromones', there hasnt seem to be any break throughs or continuation of its research other than the regurgitation of the above article.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,510 Posts
Well, my greatest fascination is when people do what to me seems to be hypocritical and irrational things. I've focused my academic interest on heavy metal music for this reason. Beware, some self-promotion!

Satan: The Perfect Man (Sanna Fridh) - Academia.edu

In Pursuit of the Vikings - An anthropological and critical discourse analysis of imagined communities (Sanna Fridh) - Academia.edu

:laughing:

Also:
http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/mmp3ever1140211.pdf

Other than that, I can't say I've read any recent academic article that piqued my interest.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,669 Posts
Top performers are not the most impressive when extreme performance indicates unreliability

Abstract

The relationship between performance and ability is a central concern in the social sciences: Are the most successful much more able than others, and are failures unskilled? Prior research has shown that noise and self-reinforcing dynamics make performance unpredictable and lead to a weak association between ability and performance. Here we show that the same mechanisms that generate unpredictability imply that extreme performances can be relatively uninformative about ability.

As a result, the highest performers may not have the highest expected ability and should not be imitated or praised. We show that whether higher performance indicates higher ability depends on whether extreme performance could be achieved by skill or requires luck.



Top performers are not the most impressive when extreme performance indicates unreliability
Did you have a password to read this? Because the actual article is behind a pay wall... If so, please post the full text.

I'm curious how they measured "performance", and in what domain. It would be very difficult to conduct an experiment about generic "performance" across several domains and still be able to perform a sound statistical analysis on the results. It would be extremely difficult to control for different factors that would inevitably skew the results unless the research question was narrowed.

It seems that this article is about people at work who outperform others, and how they can often be unreliable in their performance. This is not very interesting to me, because it is so obvious. But maybe the article is about something more interesting, who knows...

Edit:

Ahh, here, I've found something. Apparently the study is about how upbringing affects performance for "top performers" such as Bill Gates, who are often unreliable in their performance at work. It says the people who are actually the highest performers are often the people who work for people like Bill Gates in auxillary roles. It says that apparently, dropping out of college and becoming a mogul is very unlikely to happen to all but the luckiest individuals. Well, that's nothing too earthshattering. I grew up quite poor, and I'm no Bill Gates. But I still consider myself successful. Maybe I'm a better performer than Bill Gates-- woot, that idea strokes my ego, given that he's so rich and all. As a scholarship kid who went to a school full of highly privileged kids, and at times could not afford a bus ticket home for vacations, I can relate to the resentment of the idle rich. I also like the idea that my performance is better than theirs, although the article wasn't actually talking about run-of-the-mill white collar workers, but Fortune 500 founder and CEO types.

Work hard is the take away message, because it's unlikely grand things are going to fall into your lap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,669 Posts
These are articles about research articles, but they are much more fun to read.
Research Shows That the Smarter People Are, the More Susceptible They Are to Cognitive Bias : The New Yorker <- Smarter people make dumber mistakes
Famous Novelists on Symbolism in Their Work and Whether It Was Intentional - Mental Floss <- famous novelists on whether symbolism in their work was intentional
Yeah, I got those two bias questions correct the first time I read the top one. But I'm still biased.

That's why science exists. Because humans are always biased, and irrational, it's the scientific method that's rational. Nobody knows like a scientist that unchallenged assumptions simply won't hold water if there's no reliable and replicable data to back them up

I liked this part:

What explains this result? One provocative hypothesis is that the bias blind spot arises because of a mismatch between how we evaluate others and how we evaluate ourselves. When considering the irrational choices of a stranger, for instance, we are forced to rely on behavioral information; we see their biases from the outside, which allows us to glimpse their systematic thinking errors. However, when assessing our own bad choices, we tend to engage in elaborate introspection. We scrutinize our motivations and search for relevant reasons; we lament our mistakes to therapists and ruminate on the beliefs that led us astray.

The problem with this introspective approach is that the driving forces behind biases—the root causes of our irrationality—are largely unconscious, which means they remain invisible to self-analysis and impermeable to intelligence. In fact, introspection can actually compound the error, blinding us to those primal processes responsible for many of our everyday failings. We spin eloquent stories, but these stories miss the point. The more we attempt to know ourselves, the less we actually understand.
Of course, the actual findings are much less sexy than the headline. What they actually indicated is that intelligence doesn't get rid of bias, not that intelligent people are 'more biased' overall, but that all people are equally biased (with a slight correlation between higher intelligence, but not extremely high intelligence, and one certain type of cognitive bias called the "bias blind spot." Other research has shown a correlation between low intelligence/competence and certain other cognitive biases, see also The Dunning Kreuger Effect). I would also argue that anyone who got those bias questions incorrect was not actually very intelligent, but that's a methodology problem. I'd also be interested in seeing these findings replicated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
@nadjasix
As always, your comment was informative and awesome.
You would really like Welcome to Less Wrong, I think.
They have a great wiki, a great portion of which is devoted to articles about cognitive biases.
Check it out. If you want to. (If you decide to read the wiki, read through the sequences.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,011 Posts
What defines "interesting"?
I believe part of the thread's idea is to see what INTPs find interesting.

Check this one out:

The Role of Sociolinguistics in The Development and Conduct of Federal Surveys
by Yuling Pan
http://www.fcsm.gov/03papers/Panfinal.pdf

(Really dry title - don't let it deter you)

Extract:

"In American culture, the use of 'please' and 'thank you' is the normal and standard way to show
politeness. These two phrases are used more often than other polite hedges. Does it always work to insert
“please” and “thank you” in a sentence that we want to use and make it polite?

One example to illustrate this comes from a consultation session with an American telecommunications
company (c.f., Pan, Scollon and Scollon, 2002). A consultant on Chinese language and culture was called
upon to monitor the professionalism and politeness of the Chinese-speaking sales representatives in a
telecommunications company. The training manager of the company was trying to get their Chinese speaking sales representatives to use markers of politeness such as the equivalents of English 'Please' and
'Thank you' in making their sales pitches. The sales representatives were given a Chinese script translated
from the English script. According to the script, the sales representatives were supposed to state their full
name first and use “please” and “thank you” at every possible point in the conversation where it would be
appropriate in American English.

During the three days of the monitoring, 10 Chinese-speaking sales representatives were monitored. Most
of them got 0 point in the item of politeness level because they failed to use 'please' and 'thank you' in
their conversation with their customers. As a result they failed in their performance evaluation, because
their politeness level was not up to the company’s standard. However the calls monitored were very polite
by Chinese standards, and most of the sales representatives succeeded in signing up their customers for the
company’s service. Yet by the manager's rating scale they received 0 point. The sales representatives were
very frustrated with the training program.

In many languages including Chinese, it is not customary to use expressions like 'please' and 'thank you'
in daily conversation. These terms are used mostly on very formal occasions. The use of ‘please’ and
‘thank you’ may sound too formal to the extent that it enlarges, instead of closing, the social distance
between the participants. When used excessively in interviews, it sounds fishy and gives the feeling of
setting up a trap to get customers to buy some service. In Chinese conversations politeness is indicated by
other linguistic features, including repetition of a verb (e.g., 'see, see', 'read, read') or adjective phrase
(e.g., 'fine, fine'), a tag question (e.g., 'Is that OK?'), prosodic features (tone of voice, intonation, rate of
speech, or pauses), and other discursive features (Pan, 2000)."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,486 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
...I believe part of the thread's idea is to see what INTPs find interesting.
It could be.Though personally, I'll take interesting research from anywhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: nadjasix

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,486 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
It could be.Though personally, I'll take interesting research from anywhere.
I'm disappointed in you, Ista...
I thought you were trying to kill two birds with one stone.
I thought about it and then decided the bird killing was not needed, since 80 - 90% of research is probably done by INTPs / INTJs, who often have overlapping interests, it might be sort of incestuous.
 
1 - 20 of 125 Posts
Top