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Saiyed En Sabah Nur said:
Seems like one of those dysfunctions of the materially privileged (unless it also applies to being alive). People who have to worry about food, shelter, safety, etc. are probably rarely apathetic.
If you genuinely don't care about shit and want to shake up your routine to change that, try going without something crucial for a while. Like just leave your house/apartment for a couple of days with nothing but the clothes on your back. It may make you feel more alive.
And yes you're right, I like your point, because it doesn't instantly jump to the conclusion of a medical condition, I think it's a little bit of both (in my case), as one brings the other...
Eh, I disagree with the 'materially privileged' part. I was horribly depressed and apathetic when I was a homeless kid. It's trading one type of poison for another.

The 'responsibilities' is what created much of the apathy (even then), because in general the responsibilities I end up with are counter-productive to health and well-being, and serve to advance a lifestyle that I generally disagree with on a fundamental level, or advance someone else's agenda that I disagree with, and that has been like... most of my life.

Just to give a somewhat raw and uncomfortable example, when I was 12 I was living in a shelter that was not following regulations and allowing abuses to occur between residents. When a group of inspectors came, I was told to shut up about everything and pretend I mentored the younger children every day. They set me up with a little fake classroom area where I read to the littler kids as the inspectors walked by, trying to contain my seething rage about the whole thing. At least we had beds to sleep in, so I wasn't about to blow the whistle. That was my 'responsibility'.

And with that kind of realization... that you have no power over your circumstances, that is when one might stop feeling things in a healthy manner.

Apathy is a good defense mechanism when one has buried their anger, helplessness, and disappointment, as someone has said. When alex says there were mental health issues that prevented him from taking on responsibilities, I hear a bit of this type of experience in there, as well. Getting out of that mindset is very difficult if it dominated thinking for a long time. It has nothing to do with being privileged, but I can see where that disconnect surfaces when someone can exercise more control over their life but has learned not to do it, for whatever reason.

So, it's not so much about having responsibilities as it is about the belief that you can change your circumstances, decide how you want to live, and what responsibilities you will have, imo.

(sorry to get all heavy on y'all, it just seems like it should be said)
 

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Eh, I disagree with the 'materially privileged' part. I was horribly depressed and apathetic when I was a homeless kid. It's trading one type of poison for another.

The 'responsibilities' is what created much of the apathy (even then), because in general the responsibilities I end up with are counter-productive to health and well-being, and serve to advance a lifestyle that I generally disagree with on a fundamental level, or advance someone else's agenda that I disagree with, and that has been like... most of my life.

Just to give a somewhat raw and uncomfortable example, when I was 12 I was living in a shelter that was not following regulations and allowing abuses to occur between residents. When a group of inspectors came, I was told to shut up about everything and pretend I mentored the younger children every day. They set me up with a little fake classroom area where I read to the littler kids as the inspectors walked by, trying to contain my seething rage about the whole thing. At least we had beds to sleep in, so I wasn't about to blow the whistle. That was my 'responsibility'.

And with that kind of realization... that you have no power over your circumstances, that is when one might stop feeling things in a healthy manner.

Apathy is a good defense mechanism when one has buried their anger, helplessness, and disappointment, as someone has said. When alex says there were mental health issues that prevented him from taking on responsibilities, I hear a bit of this type of experience in there, as well. Getting out of that mindset is very difficult if it dominated thinking for a long time. It has nothing to do with being privileged, but I can see where that disconnect surfaces when someone can exercise more control over their life but has learned not to do it, for whatever reason.

So, it's not so much about having responsibilities as it is about the belief that you can change your circumstances, decide how you want to live, and what responsibilities you will have, imo.

(sorry to get all heavy on y'all, it just seems like it should be said)
hey squirt, interesting perspective and experience as well, I'm trying to figure it out as well and sort of micro adjusting my thoughts as I read more and have more knowledge, I would say it's possible it can stem from both ways (completely irresponsible, and responsible). The way it stems from irresponsibility is that ; responsibility gives you a purpose (the fundamental reason of why people work is not only to earn money, but to keep them busy, if you don't do anything (your existential purpose becomes meaningless, hence depression occurs), the materially privileged can fall into this gap because of the sole reason that they don't have to do anything and everything is provided for them, it is very possible for them to eventually fall into the umbrella of depression, worrying about life, with the ending state to end in apathy and not caring at all about life whilst having difficulty to keep up with basic or real life responsibilities depending on the time spent doing nothing. Now, likewise when it comes to apathy that sources from responsibility, it's as possible as irresponsibility is, the difference between them is the source and the cause, apathy can be caused by many things so it's definitely not out of the picture to exclude any of them. Your example basically confirms it anyway, if one is not happy with their life route but have no control over it, they are very prone to the same feelings as well. Another example : a person that is forced to go to college but doesn't want to be there, but he can't leave anyway because of parents(?) adult example that could probably cause the same feelings long term..
 
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