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Anyone have a certain attraction to death. Not in the emo/gothic sense, nor the desire to kill oneself. What I am talking about is the intense emotion that it causes. The depth. How it's final and blunt. An appreciation for it cus it triggers existential thoughts...

i hope I am not the only or you guys think I am a freak. But songs, shows, books, movies about death attracts me.
 

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Anyone have a certain attraction to death. Not in the emo/gothic sense, nor the desire to kill oneself. What I am talking about is the intense emotion that it causes. The depth. How it's final and blunt. An appreciation for it cus it triggers existential thoughts...

i hope I am not the only or you guys think I am a freak. But songs, shows, books, movies about death attracts me.
I'm don't think I'm attracted to death, but it's something I have a lot of experience with. I spend a lot of time with elderly people, especially ones who don't have family to visit them. And, as with all people, they eventually move on from this world. There's a concept or whisper of an idea, I often find in death, and it's both painful and fascinating. I'll share it with you.

To me, there's something intensely selfish that occurs when another dies around you. Every time. It's annoying, because I always tell myself... be in the moment, don't be selfish. But, hours go by as you sit there in the hospital, and it's hard to sit still. Watching someone you love disappear. It's a very real experience.

I wrote a little something, awhile back. One Last Breath | David L. Bowman
 

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It's hard for me to say, @arwen7.

I've been wrapped up in the existential consideration of "to be or not to be" since 7th grade throughout much of my life.
 
...To die, to sleep,
To sleep, perchance to Dream; aye, there's the rub,
for in that sleep of death, what dreams may come,
when we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
must give us pause. There's the respect
that makes Calamity of so long life:
...Thus conscience does make cowards of us all...
Hamlet, Shakespeare​
Around that time I also began to understand my own mortality, that I will die some day. Hearing my heartbeat while my head lay on a pillow trying to fall asleep has often hindered my falling asleep because of the implications of its cessation. So consideration of my own death is a very complicated and contradictory combination of competing ideas and feelings.[SUP]1[/SUP]

I'm not sure that I can unravel the attraction to death well enough to see if there is that more detached examiner's approach in me. It could be me lying to myself.
I have found in my experience that I am able to handle the grotesqueness of death in its physical manifestations, as gory and horrific as they may be, more so than I am able to experience people going through the process of dying. [That's regarding strangers or people only casually known.][HR][/HR][SUP]1[/SUP] I suppose the more accurate reality of my attraction to my own death is, in the most self-rejecting/reality-rejecting position, the closest possible real condition approaching having never lived at all. Nullification. It can't happen. I can only stop being in this world.
 
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I don't think you're a freak, nope.
I don't share the sentiment. I think about death quite a lot, but I don't feel about death.
I think about it because it's the Great Mystery.

And nope, when there's death in songs, movies, tv shows, etc. I am not attracted or fascinated. I feel consumed by grief if I cared about the characters, and I get angry and want to punch things "Give me the character back!!!!"

And for example, thinking of Lily and James Potter, I've never been interested or fascinated by their deaths like so many people are, they even make entire podcasts about it. I've always been fascinated by their lives before they died.

And for example, I'm a huge fan of Ghost Whisperer, but I am bored to death (oh no I didn't say that!) by all the ghosts and how they died and going to the light and whatnots. I yawn. What I'm interested in is the lives of the actual living characters, like the medium, her husband, the alive humans that come and go, the neighbors, etc.
 
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INFPs are types that want to know what it means to be alive, and because death is so closely entwined it is logical to also comprehend death. It is only weird here in the west because it is not openly talked about, because of this we have a mentality of living forever which is false. If too many people realised what death meant in every passing moment, their attitude to how they have lived and will live would slowly take different forms compared to each other. People will do what they actually want to be doing, not just doing to stay alive through a economic context. Why are people trying to buy their lives back when they are already living?

I do not experience these intense emotions toward death, but a younger me did. However it still remains profound. I boiled it down to a feeling of deep regret, of what i could have become if only i had been more aware. These type of realizations are seen through the lens of death and i find it is a really helpful way to prioritize when i'm stuck.
 

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Hmm... I would classify it as more of an interest in the consequences of death. For example, I love Alfred Hitchcock Presents, and many of the characters die or are murdered by other main characters. I wouldn’t say I anticipate the death itself, but for the twist of fate that leaves the wrongdoer caught out. So, maybe my curiosity is more with justice after death. Movies like the Saw series and gory films / books are not my cup of tea in general. It leaves me unsettled.
 

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It's certainly an existential topic for me at times. I also like learning about different culture's reaction to death; that it's just part of the cycle.
 

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No to all you mentioned. The only thing I'm curious about are first hand reports of NDE. That's it. I want to know what people experience when heart/brain activity stops, and then they are brought back to life.
 

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I wouldn't say I think about it a lot. Death is not the worst thing that could happen to me or my family members, honestly.

I also work with a lot of older people, some of them with chronic unrelieved severe pain from cancer, some of which have advanced dementia and are not really "living" anymore (in the sense that they are no longer holding on to experience and have lost even their sense of self), but their family is so set on just keeping them alive that they continue to consent for procedure after procedure, some of which are straight up painful.

As much as it hurts to lose a loved one, death is natural and normal... trying to fend it off no matter the cost can be problematic, imo.
 

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I am very closely acquainted with death, having been very close to my own death numerous times in my life--most closely just in April, when I suffered a coronary vaso-spam that crushed my coronary arteries. I was flatline in the ambulance. As an allergic person, I've had more close calls than I can count when I was saved by my epipens and Emergency Room doctors. Also, I once fell over 1400 feet off a glacier and over a cliff, resulting in 17 broken bones and a lacerated heart.

I'm comfortable with the topic of my own death and accepting when it happens to people I love. I lost a college friend this week. Of course I'm sad and I grieve, but I have to be ok with it because it's reality.

The moment of death, when consciousness ceases is not scary to me. I just don't like to see people suffer. That is my outlook on death.
 

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There are many stories inspired or themed with death. Majora's mask from the LoZ series is an example. One of it's themes is the fear of death and mortality.

The concept is fascinating but also scary. Like when you realise your existence is only temporary and one day you won't be around anymore. Not the most pleasant thing to think about when I get lost in thought!

If you have lost someone close to you or seen others who have you will know that dying is not pleasant. To quote from a tv show "death is not serene." It's one of the worst things to experience, when a family member gets gravely ill.

It's also ironic though. The reason we age is because oxygen in the air slowly damages our cells. The thing that's keeping us alive is also well, not.
 

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@arwen7

Have you experienced a lot of death in your life? The reason I ask is that I have and I also share a very strong fascination with death. I think it's human to be attracted to discovering the "unknown" and some people may feel even more strongly pulled toward this theme than others.

When I was a teenager, my two close friends both died along with my (step) brother. I always thought it was my experiences that created the fascination and desire to examine it rather than anything else. Just wondering how many of you who say that you are fascinated with it have experienced a lot of it.

I don't think there's a day that goes by that I don't put at least 15 minutes of time into examining death. It's a huge theme in my life and it seems to be an important thing to gain comfortability with and be able to face.
 

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Also, we currently have the right amount of oxygen in the air (It contains 21% of the atmospheric gases), a little bit more or a little bit less could already have severe implications. A very long time ago (especially before Snow Ball Earth), we had way less oxygen in the air, but currently we have less oxygen in the air than we had previously. I'm not sure how oxygen levels evolved specifically, but I know that 300 million years ago, oxygen almost did contain 30% of the gases, and beasts, especially insects were much larger then. When we have more oxygen in the air, we generally are able to get bigger, the planet would cool but also there would me much more forest fires and less forests, and it's actually keeping a balance in some way, since forests "breathe" CO2 and "produce" oxygen, so if forests burn, there are less forests to produce oxygen (the thing that set them in fire), but of course it's not that simple. But the planet in general will cool when you have more forests, and would warm, if forests decline. If everything (or even half) in the atmosphere would be oxygen, everything would burn to death. EVEN STEEL. Nothing would be left. It would be an apocalypse. Earth would be a hellhole that never stops burning. We would be death or have to flee underground or to Mars. Our entire atmosphere would most likely be gone in a matter ... of yeah weeks?
 

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These are the oxygen levels. You can see that during Snowball Earth (when the whole earth was covered with a metres thick ice glacier (almost more than 1000-2000 metres long), a lot of oxygen was produced in the atmosphere (levels sharply rose) and this may have created the bottleneck required for the evolution of multicellular life. The first Snowball Earth 2400 million years ago called Huronian glaciation also created the Great Oxygenation Event (where Oxygen made it's first appearance in the atmosphere). Oxygen back then was a toxic gas for bacteria, and there was possibly a mass extinction event between bacteria (with (and because of) the evolution of cyanobacteria).

On the continents, the melting of glaciers would release massive amounts of glacial deposit, which would erode and weather. The resulting sediments supplied to the ocean would be high in nutrients such as phosphorus, which combined with the abundance of CO2 would trigger a cyanobacteria population explosion, which would cause a relatively rapid reoxygenation of the atmosphere, which may have contributed to the rise of the Ediacaran biota and the subsequent Cambrian explosion — a higher oxygen concentration allowing large multicellular lifeforms to develop. Although the positive feedback loop would melt the ice in geological short order, perhaps less than 1,000 years, replenishment of atmospheric oxygen and depletion of the CO2 levels would take further millennia.
The second spike in oxygen levels was caused by the first appearance of land planets (of population/colonization of the barren Earth land by plants). Back then, we were in the Devonian, and the seas were heavily population with many different of marine species with the first sharks, lots of trilobites, large sea scorpions, many cephalopods, and name it. The sudden increase of oxygen because of the land colonization of the plants caused a catastrophe in the seas. A series of extinction pulses happened in the Devonian seas over multiple million years (as long as 25 million years, but with very large spikes over a time of three million years). Those were created by the anoxia events and climate changes associated with sea level changes as a consequence of the land colonization of forests.

During the Devonian, land plants underwent a hugely significant phase of evolution. Their maximum height went from 30 cm at the start of the Devonian, to 30 m[28][citation needed] at the end of the period. This increase in height was made possible by the evolution of advanced vascular systems, which permitted the growth of complex branching and rooting systems.[14] In conjunction with this, the development of seeds permitted reproduction and dispersal in areas which were not waterlogged, allowing plants to colonise previously inhospitable inland and upland areas.[14] The two factors combined to greatly magnify the role of plants on the global scale. In particular, Archaeopteris forests expanded rapidly during the closing stages of the Devonian.
Life was ROUGH, and because of the anoxia events (toxis seas), many animals went higher into the seas, because anoxic conditions extended into even upper water columns. Sea species that needed oxygen to survive went higher and higher (more overpopulated higher seas), while the deep waters were toxic (and creatures who don't need oxygen) were flourishing. Jellyfishes also like anoxic conditions, since they produce very rapidly, are predators, and not many species have them as prey, and they can't see but move through touch, making them effective at night as well. Some species even WENT OUT OF THE WATER, BECAUSE THEY COULDN'T BREATHE. The oceans was soo toxic. Or the higher columns were so overpopulated that many sea species died... and to escape the really dangerous higher seas, they just tried to be as much on the land as they could. It was dangerous, they didn't like it, but at least, there weren't predators there... and they could even relax there (and then go in the water to breathe) and jump out of the water again, even deliberating injuring them on their fins, since they didn't like it. It's like someone who lost their hands, using their knuckles. Eventually over time, some of them EVOLVED, and the fins changed into very primitive legs, the first amphibians were born. They didn't had to care about the toxic seas. They didn't had to care anytime longer about the predators. There was plenty of food on the land (the trees or the insects).

During the Carbineforous, the Earth cooled, got very wet, and plant life flourished. Oxygen levels increased, and insects could become VERY LARGE.



Meet the dragonfly of a metre long. They were predatory... and were one of the largest flying insects we've ever know



This is one of the largest centipedes ever in a legendary fight with an amphibian of the Carbineforous age. It is thought that the centipede would have won the fight, and killed the amphibian.
 

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We age, forests burn and iron rusts. SCREW YOU, OXYGEN. The cause of death for planets, animals and even objects.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
@arwen7

Have you experienced a lot of death in your life? The reason I ask is that I have and I also share a very strong fascination with death. I think it's human to be attracted to discovering the "unknown" and some people may feel even more strongly pulled toward this theme than others.

When I was a teenager, my two close friends both died along with my (step) brother. I always thought it was my experiences that created the fascination and desire to examine it rather than anything else. Just wondering how many of you who say that you are fascinated with it have experienced a lot of it.

I don't think there's a day that goes by that I don't put at least 15 minutes of time into examining death. It's a huge theme in my life and it seems to be an important thing to gain comfortability with and be able to face.
No i haven't aside from the knowledge that my condition has the potential to kill me. If a seizure lasts more than 5 minutes, chance of death skyrockets. And there has been times when I feel myself going into a seizure knowing that I may very well not wake from it.
 

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I find a body or skeleton resting in the natural place of death to be peaceful. I don't like the idea of moving dead people around or messing with them. I know their spirit is gone, but it doesn't make their body register as a mere object to me. I don't want to be embalmed, and I don't want to be disturbed. I don't want my body to travel from place to place. Just let it rot in the ground.
 
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I had the following random thoughts on death. This is an incomplete summation of what one can say about this life changing experience. (I don't think there is ever enough to write about the subject.)



Death of close ones has a profound effect on survivors. While it is a form of suffering to lose someone close, it is one of the most profound learning experiences in life. It opens your mind to what you haven't been paying attention to.

Firstly, you suddenly realize a great deal of things that the person who passes was trying to communicate.

Secondly, you see more realistically the reality of life you've been ignoring. For example, just how big or small is your circle of close relatives and friends.

Thirdly, it makes you more human and appreciate others and their suffering by increasing your capacity for empathy.

The period of grieving that follows the death of a close one, is more fulfilling and teaches you more in a short time than the experience of many years of living without loss.

I lost my mother when I was 11 and my wife of 25 years 8 years ago. These losses imprint you with a sadness, the likes of which is both profound and it never stops teaching you about the suffering that many lonely people go through one day to day basis.

Songs like Eleanor Rigby are born of that sadness and in fact songs that pull on your heart strings help you to experience your emotions again which is cathartic in your recovery from grief.

It's mind boggling to survivors that this profound life altering experience one can go through is somehow out of awareness of the many who have yet to experience it.

To people who have to come to terms early in life with the experience of death and loss, death is like the elephant in the room that the entire rest of the world is blind to.
 
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