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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I'd appreciate advice on how to choose 2 majors (definitely doing) and wanted to get some advice from NT's and decided that INTJ was a fair match based on what I'm considering.
-Natural Sciences in general (Biology, Chemistry, Biophysics etc....) because it covers premed and the medical field seems to be loaded with all sorts of different jobs.
-Business: I'm considering Finance, Econ, or Accounting. If I do one of these I'm likely to grab a CPA/CFA license.
-Engineering: I have no idea which kind but many of them all seem to cover premed, they are also involved with science and I want at least one of the majors so be math and science heavy. The job market for them is great too of course.
-Computer science: I've always enjoyed working with computers, I find them to be very interesting in general. Love how the field is always developing.
-Music (piano performance): Personal interest, definitely will study it professionally in the future anyways, it's hard to determine if it's appropriate now though.
In terms of advice I want some insight on how you would make your decision and what the advantages are in each major. It would be even more helpful if someone had a lot of knowledge about the advantages a combination of 2 specific major entails, and would share it. I think the main problem is that I don't know what I want to go into.
I've already tried talking to a college counselor because that's what everyone says and based on what they tell me, they don't seem to know a lot about each major and seem to give very basic, vague advice that doesn't do much for me. How does what you choose to study connect with your personality? I'm going to be putting this in the career forum too. Thank you for your time.
 

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Personally, I've always liked science, so I mostly focused on science classes, but I also took classes in a variety of other things just to get a flavor of what they were about, especially things that I had little or no exposure to when I was in high school. In the end I ended up getting a degree in geology because it was interesting to me and appealed to my desire to understand how everything is connected. It's surprising what you can tell about the history of an area just by looking at a bunch of rocks, and it really does tie into other areas of science, so knowing some chemistry, physics, and biology was extremely useful. I think that if after 2-3 classes, you're still interested in something, that's a good way to tell it's a good fit. Unless you're in a highly competitive program, declaring a major right out of the gate isn't that important. If you're already at college, it might be worth talking to a few people from those departments, students and professors, that interest you to get a better idea of what to expect. If you're not in college yet, it might be worth sitting in on a few lectures when you're out doing college visits.
 
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The following are the only two I can speak to, but here's my spiel...


-Engineering: I have no idea which kind but many of them all seem to cover premed, they are also involved with science and I want at least one of the majors so be math and science heavy. The job market for them is great too of course.
I got my degree in Computer and Electrical Engineering, but I also got minors in Computer Science, Physics, Math, and a couple of other things. If you decide to go the engineering route, it will consumer your every waking moment of the day by the time you make it to graduation.

The way it worked at my school (it actually seemed like it worked this way at every accredited college) was that in your freshmen and sophomore years you took an "Intro to Engineering" class where you covered all of the different engineering disciplines so that you could get a feel for what to expect from each program and to help you choose a path.

You also had to take core engineering classes like chemistry, physics, calculus, engineering math, statics and dynamics, intro to circuits/electrical engineering, a basic C programming class and a couple of other classes and you had to PASS all of these classes with a certain combined GPA before you could even declare a specific engineering discipline as your major (ie. I was a junior before Computer and Electrical Engineering was officially my major).

So going back to the "Intro to Engineering" class... in my class there were probably about 120 students. The class was offered at 3 different times throughout the day, so I figure there were about 350ish students that were interested in becoming engineers my freshmen year. When it came time to do our senior design projects and ultimately time to get our diplomas... there were 12 of us from that initial group that made it. That's 12 Computer Engineers, Electrical Engineers and those that dual majored in Computer and Electrical engineering.

Lots of people mismanaged their time, took on too much and their grades suffered or just found that engineering wasn't for them, so I would suggest talking to students currently going through the grind and get a pulse on what their workload entails and REALLY stop to reflect on whether that's something you want to do.

I remember my days starting at 5 or 6am where I'd start trying to prep for the day's material... sit through class from like 8am-5pm and then sit through labs from 6pm-12am and THEN go home and try to knock out some homework before ultimately falling asleep with my face firmly planted in a textbook. Also, spending the weekends either in a lab or hidden in my cave in the library studying the day away.

It was VERY rewarding in the end, but it takes dedication and a lot of work to make it through.


-Computer science: I've always enjoyed working with computers, I find them to be very interesting in general. Love how the field is always developing.
Computer Science was a little more forgiving than engineering, but there were lots of late nights filled with programming, debugging and compiling while I worked on my engineering stuff (only to find out that my logic was reversed somewhere and after my 2 second change to the code was done, I had 20-30 solid minutes of compiling ahead of me...again). I think dual majoring would be easier to pull off as a CS major, but there's still plenty of time and dedication required to make it through the classes. ESPECIALLY if you don't fully grasp a concept (like the first time I was introduced to referencing and de-referencing pointers).


Also know that you don't necessarily have to have your plan pinned down on day one of college. Some of my friends changed majors countless time. Some stuck with their original majors. Some failed out. Some decided college wasn't for them and some got cold feet before the whole experience began.

Take your classes seriously, but do take time to have some fun. I think if I could relive my undergraduate experience again, I definitely would've tried to have more fun.

Okay, I feel like I've rambled on and gone off on quite a few tangents, but hopefully you find something useful in here.
 

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If you happen to like all the above subject, take Computer Science as your major. The reason is you could fuse/intersect your computer science knowledge with Natural Science, Finance/Business, Engineering, Music to create something revolutionary new thing - which is a good thing if you want to start a billion dollar company.


Why Software Is Eating The World


"And that could open up a whole new realm of biology. In other words, biology will be reduced to computer science."-
Michio Kaku

An explosion of start-ups is changing finance for the better
 

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If you're going to double major, I would certainly not do piano performance as one of them. You'd be practicing too much to have time for anything else. I do not believe it's possible to go wrong with an engineering degree.

I would pair up engineering with whichever of the remaining three you like doing the best because, despite all the rationale and practicality I'm used to giving, when deciding upon a career, I am a solid advocate of doing what you enjoy rather than doing what will earn you the most money. If you strive to be the absolute best and pair engineering with biochemistry, business, or computer science, you're bound to be near the top of any potential employer's list.
 

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Two things are virtually certain you're going to change your major, and have more than a dozen different careers in your life. Choose something that's virtually universal, or hell it almost doesn't matter considering the different career changes you'll experience.
 

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Study mathematics if you can't make up your mind... It basically transfers anywhere due to its universality. Regardless of branch or degree program, higher math will help. If you end up switching your mind, then a math minor will make-up for your efforts.

All in all, studying mathematics makes your brain form essential neural circuits that help in analytical and critical thinking.

Or you could study something retarded that only requires a pulse and a library card in order to graduate.... Something like 75% of college students tend to go for 'cause they're lazy, dumb and conformists (plus we all know everyone goes to college to party and get some pussy and not to pursue intellectual enlightenment because that's like totally for losers). Something like a B.F.A. in Liberal Tarts.

In the process, join a whore-rority/fag-ternity, give the true intellectuals a hard time (picking on them for being social retards or just not being "fun", take away resources e.g. parking spaces, loan funds, class overloads/wait-listing them, post on PerC as to why so and so INTJ won't ask you out, etc). Act like a pretentious douche because you think you can change the world with your petty degree. Get yourself in astronomical student loan debt, move back in with your parents and then proceed to cry like a bitch when you don't get hired.

Also, make sure to vote Obamerz like all these cliche-tards did twice.

Yes, we can haz.

#whitepplproblemz
 

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I'm going for Computer Science and Mathematics. They go well together and individually they both are useful for a career. I found my passion for these subjects just by exploring them. For math, I have watched and read a lot of things about graduate level mathematics and my interest has stayed strong (even though I don't understand everything), and all my life I've loved the subject, so it's a safe choice. Computer science is less a safe choice because I've only been working with it for a year or two, but so far I've loved learning it and have done some independent study of different programming languages to great success. So, my suggestion is take a few classes in the things you might be interested in and see if you are. Also utilize the beauty of the internet and ask people questions who have jobs in these fields already- seriously, if there is a forum for MBTI there is a forum for people in the subjects you like (___exchange websites are also good. e.g. stackexchange.com).

If you have no idea and just want to chose something, I agree with previous people that Math and CS are both great choices for the economy and they allow for flexibility in finding your career later on. I'm not so sure a degree in Music would give you flexibility in choosing a career.
 

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Guess I'm the weird one. Law with a focus on Criminal Justice is my major. I get to solve the puzzles and win against the defense in the courtroom. Go for engineering if you want to most versatile and the sciences if you want to explore the unkown. I wish you luck in whichever major as they are all difficult paths with worthy rewards at the end.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Personally, I've always liked science, so I mostly focused on science classes, but I also took classes in a variety of other things just to get a flavor of what they were about, especially things that I had little or no exposure to when I was in high school. In the end I ended up getting a degree in geology because it was interesting to me and appealed to my desire to understand how everything is connected. It's surprising what you can tell about the history of an area just by looking at a bunch of rocks, and it really does tie into other areas of science, so knowing some chemistry, physics, and biology was extremely useful. I think that if after 2-3 classes, you're still interested in something, that's a good way to tell it's a good fit. Unless you're in a highly competitive program, declaring a major right out of the gate isn't that important. If you're already at college, it might be worth talking to a few people from those departments, students and professors, that interest you to get a better idea of what to expect. If you're not in college yet, it might be worth sitting in on a few lectures when you're out doing college visits.
Yeah all the concepts in Geology really drew me in because it was so easy to see how everything was connected. I really liked the first few days of class....until the damn rocks came in and it didn't seem very big picture anymore. I took a class in my first semester and know it's not for me in terms of a major.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The following are the only two I can speak to, but here's my spiel...




I got my degree in Computer and Electrical Engineering, but I also got minors in Computer Science, Physics, Math, and a couple of other things. If you decide to go the engineering route, it will consumer your every waking moment of the day by the time you make it to graduation.

The way it worked at my school (it actually seemed like it worked this way at every accredited college) was that in your freshmen and sophomore years you took an "Intro to Engineering" class where you covered all of the different engineering disciplines so that you could get a feel for what to expect from each program and to help you choose a path.

You also had to take core engineering classes like chemistry, physics, calculus, engineering math, statics and dynamics, intro to circuits/electrical engineering, a basic C programming class and a couple of other classes and you had to PASS all of these classes with a certain combined GPA before you could even declare a specific engineering discipline as your major (ie. I was a junior before Computer and Electrical Engineering was officially my major).

So going back to the "Intro to Engineering" class... in my class there were probably about 120 students. The class was offered at 3 different times throughout the day, so I figure there were about 350ish students that were interested in becoming engineers my freshmen year. When it came time to do our senior design projects and ultimately time to get our diplomas... there were 12 of us from that initial group that made it. That's 12 Computer Engineers, Electrical Engineers and those that dual majored in Computer and Electrical engineering.

Lots of people mismanaged their time, took on too much and their grades suffered or just found that engineering wasn't for them, so I would suggest talking to students currently going through the grind and get a pulse on what their workload entails and REALLY stop to reflect on whether that's something you want to do.

I remember my days starting at 5 or 6am where I'd start trying to prep for the day's material... sit through class from like 8am-5pm and then sit through labs from 6pm-12am and THEN go home and try to knock out some homework before ultimately falling asleep with my face firmly planted in a textbook. Also, spending the weekends either in a lab or hidden in my cave in the library studying the day away.

It was VERY rewarding in the end, but it takes dedication and a lot of work to make it through.




Computer Science was a little more forgiving than engineering, but there were lots of late nights filled with programming, debugging and compiling while I worked on my engineering stuff (only to find out that my logic was reversed somewhere and after my 2 second change to the code was done, I had 20-30 solid minutes of compiling ahead of me...again). I think dual majoring would be easier to pull off as a CS major, but there's still plenty of time and dedication required to make it through the classes. ESPECIALLY if you don't fully grasp a concept (like the first time I was introduced to referencing and de-referencing pointers).


Also know that you don't necessarily have to have your plan pinned down on day one of college. Some of my friends changed majors countless time. Some stuck with their original majors. Some failed out. Some decided college wasn't for them and some got cold feet before the whole experience began.

Take your classes seriously, but do take time to have some fun. I think if I could relive my undergraduate experience again, I definitely would've tried to have more fun.

Okay, I feel like I've rambled on and gone off on quite a few tangents, but hopefully you find something useful in here.
Have fun? How could anyone have fun in the tornado you've described and if engineering swallowed that much of your time than how did you manage CS on top of it? What kind of school was this? All the Universities I know always have tons of engineers graduating every year, it's such a popular major.
I can be dedicated so as long as I feel that my decision to go along that particular path was a good one. Once I've made my decision, I'll make a full effort. I need to be passionate about what I'm studying though, and that can come from many sources. But what you say above actually worries me. I mean if you had to work LITERALLY all day like that than I may have underestimated how hard a engineering degree is. Not to mention that I care about maintaining a high GPA.
I don't even know if I'm smart enough give what you've said. To my very limited experience thus far there hasn't been anything where if I tried, that I couldn't get an A in . But you make it sound like....
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If you're going to double major, I would certainly not do piano performance as one of them. You'd be practicing too much to have time for anything else. I do not believe it's possible to go wrong with an engineering degree.

I would pair up engineering with whichever of the remaining three you like doing the best because, despite all the rationale and practicality I'm used to giving, when deciding upon a career, I am a solid advocate of doing what you enjoy rather than doing what will earn you the most money. If you strive to be the absolute best and pair engineering with biochemistry, business, or computer science, you're bound to be near the top of any potential employer's list.
I find it interesting that your reasons for these majors seem so pragmatic, yet you say your a solid advocate for doing what you enjoy. Say you do chemical engineering, doesn't that already have a lot of science in it? Why do you think that that pairing engineering with a science would be so great? Also, in your opinion, would you say that a piano performance major is more time consuming then a science/engineering/CS degree than? Because that's what I'm hearing in the other responses. Piano performance would require AT LEAST 4 hours of practice each day, preferably 6 which I think is the standard. The more you practice the higher chances you have of succeeding but I don't think practicing more than 6 hours will yield improvement. Out of all of them, my passion just happens to be music.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If you happen to like all the above subject, take Computer Science as your major. The reason is you could fuse/intersect your computer science knowledge with Natural Science, Finance/Business, Engineering, Music to create something revolutionary new thing - which is a good thing if you want to start a billion dollar company.
If your a genius which I'm not, not sure I wanna start a billion dollar company anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'm going for Computer Science and Mathematics. They go well together and individually they both are useful for a career. I found my passion for these subjects just by exploring them. For math, I have watched and read a lot of things about graduate level mathematics and my interest has stayed strong (even though I don't understand everything), and all my life I've loved the subject, so it's a safe choice. Computer science is less a safe choice because I've only been working with it for a year or two, but so far I've loved learning it and have done some independent study of different programming languages to great success. So, my suggestion is take a few classes in the things you might be interested in and see if you are. Also utilize the beauty of the internet and ask people questions who have jobs in these fields already- seriously, if there is a forum for MBTI there is a forum for people in the subjects you like (___exchange websites are also good. e.g. stackexchange.com).

If you have no idea and just want to chose something, I agree with previous people that Math and CS are both great choices for the economy and they allow for flexibility in finding your career later on. I'm not so sure a degree in Music would give you flexibility in choosing a career.
I've run out of time to pick and choose it seems, the classes in each major start in sophomore year which I will begin in just couple days. I'm registered for a bunch of science and business courses for the time being. Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Analytical Calc & Geometry, Business Stats, Intro Business, Econ (micro)..... Lots of units. My question to you is, would you say a Biophysics (Physics) degree is harder or easier than a Mathematics degree? I'm hearing it's around the same caliber and I'm not sure I'm good enough. There's no way for me to know, someone on other forums said you have to be ridiculously smart. Same with Computer Science. Ahhhh. I've already utilized the internet a bit and lol no, a degree in music won't do much. Except, interestingly enough if you can go to law school with it or if you complete pre-med you can go to medical school.
 

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Honestly sometimes you have to make a choice and close doors. Personally, after a year of physics in high school and 20 hours of exploring it online, I realized it wasn't my thing. I don't like having to deal with units of measure and the physical world, and I know I loved Math, Econ, and Computer Science enough to be certain I still had other doors open. So I never even considered a biophysics degree. I think it's a good choice for you to take all those classes, just make sure you graduate on time!

Remember, to find a good subject you do two things: 1) Make a list of things that you're significantly better at than the average person, and 2) Make a list of things you enjoy doing. Then see where the overlaps are :). Good luck. (And I hope others will be able to give input on math vs. phyz)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Or you could study something retarded that only requires a pulse and a library card in order to graduate.... Something like 75% of college students tend to go for 'cause they're lazy, dumb and conformists (plus we all know everyone goes to college to party and get some pussy and not to pursue intellectual enlightenment because that's like totally for losers). Something like a B.F.A. in Liberal Tarts.
This is not your opinion of the majors I've listed yes? LOL. Most are very math heavy.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
after a year of physics in high school and 20 hours of exploring it online, I realized it wasn't my thing. I don't like having to deal with units of measure and the physical world
Remember, to find a good subject you do two things: 1) Make a list of things that you're significantly better at than the average person, and 2) Make a list of things you enjoy doing. Then see where the overlaps are :). Good luck. (And I hope others will be able to give input on math vs. phyz)
How exactly did you study it online? I think I need to spend some time and do that. I've though of that method but my interests and the subjects I'm good at just don't make very smooth...overlaps. :( For example, what is considered significantly better than the average? I think I'm pretty good at everything, probably more so math and writing, but not necessarily significantly. And the things I think I'm truly interested in aren't even within that zone, plus the things I'm interested in are not things I would consider worth spending the time and money to get a degree in because you can't easily find good jobs. I wanna find a combination that covers all these problems in some way but it's proving to be very difficult to do. I still haven't found out whether it's impossible to do though.
 
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