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Discussion Starter #1
Although I love being happy and doing joyful hobbies, I don't like comedy books or movies at all..

My favorites are always very deep movies with deep values/morals, yet I also enjoy simple romance movies, and some childlike movies..

I realized I specifically am looking for books that are life changing, that really challenge you..

I love intense character depth, whether it be a deep (not cheesy) romance novel or a sweeping
adventure, or both!

I want something that will really move me.

Any ideas?
 

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My favourite books:

1. Vikram Seth's 'A Suitable Boy'

2. Charlotte Bronte's 'Jane Eyre'... and favourite quote, lol:

“Do you think I am an automaton? — a machine without feelings? and can bear to have my morsel of bread snatched from my lips, and my drop of living water dashed from my cup? Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! — I have as much soul as you — and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you. I am not talking to you now through the medium of custom, conventionalities, nor even of mortal flesh: it is my spirit that addresses your spirit; just as if both had passed through the grave, and we stood at God's feet, equal — as we are!”

3, 4. Henry James's 'Portrait of a Lady' and 'The Wings of the Dove'

5, 6, 7. E.M. Forster's 'A Passage to India', 'A room with a view', 'Howards End'

8. Oscar Wilde's 'Picture of Dorian Gray'

9. C.S.Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia

8. Kazuo Ishiguro's 'Never let me go'

9. Margaret Atwood's 'The Handmaid's Tale'

10, 11, 12. Amy Tan's 'The Joy Luck Club', 'The kitchen god's wife', 'The opposite of fate'

13. George Eliot's 'Middlemarch'

14. Emily Bronte's 'Wuthering Heights'

15. Louisa M Alcott's 'Little Women'

16. Joseph Heller's 'Catch - 22'

17. Milan Kundera's 'The unbearable lightness of being'

18, 19. Iris Murdoch 'The Bell', 'The sea, the sea'

20. Alain de Botton's 'Essays in love'

Let me know how you get on :wink:


---------
21. Rani Manicka's 'The Rice Mother'
 

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@Songs unsung We've got similar literature tastes! Yay! Theres only a few I haven't read and loved there #1 is one of them. Check! Henry James, check! Forester Check all of it! Finally a literature reader. There's some I'd add, but really this is my backbone. Henrik Ibsen I'd add.

Edit: Oh yeah, I just barely started "Never Let me Go" SO amazingly good. Did read his "Remains of the Day"... last year.
Another one of my ultimate favorites is "A Woman In Berlin" You should look it up. =)
 
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Don't read a ton of fiction but here's a few that really moved me and might do the same for you...

Yukio Mishima - Spring Snow

Albert Camus - The Fall

Natsuo Kirino - Out
 

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@Songs unsung We've got similar literature tastes! Yay! Theres only a few I haven't read and loved there #1 is one of them. Check! Henry James, check! Forester Check all of it! Finally a literature reader. There's some I'd add, but really this is my backbone. Henrik Ibsen I'd add.

Edit: Oh yeah, I just barely started "Never Let me Go" SO amazingly good. Did read his "Remains of the Day"... last year.
Another one of my ultimate favorites is "A Woman In Berlin" You should look it up. =)
Thanks, Alesha. To be honest, I don't read much fiction any more, so the list is an old favourites list. I decided I get too absorbed in the imaginary - making my life feel even more surreal than it tends to do anyway. I need to become more present and strengthen my Se somehow. Mind you, I was planning to read Vikram Seth's sequel 'A suitable girl' when it is published, but I'm beginning to wonder if it will ever be finished. Too much pressure causing permanent writer's block for the author methinks..

I highly recommend 'A suitable boy'. At over 1300 pages it's one of the longest novels written in the English language, but I read it over a few days because I was so completely swept away by it at the time. I did not sleep much. You have been warned! :)

Also, I've just realised I left out Jane Austen's books from my favourites, perhaps because I don't take them very seriously, but I do love those books. BTW I claim Elizabeth Bennet as an INFJ. She is far too haughty to be an ENFP and I was a little shocked to see her so mistyped on the internet. However, you may disagree, being an ENFP yourself ;)

As for Henrik Ibsen, I'm not very fond of reading plays, which is why Shakespeare has not made my list. Did you have a particular play in mind? I see that 'A woman in Berlin' is a memoir rather than fiction, and I do still try to read non-fiction, so I might get on to reading that next year. Thanks for the recommendations.
 

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@Songs unsung I didn't put Jane Austen, either, and what's funny is I just assumed she was an essential part of your list. She's a given. =) I agree 100%. I think Elizabeth is an INFJ (although there is a bit of trickiness to it since she's got humor down. If you don't mind me saying so I think humor is an advanced skill for INFJs. Where humor is kind of sewn into Fi naturally and as part of the communication style). Jane Austen herself is INFJ-- there is no other possibility. It's so interesting how many people mistype Jane herself- everyone can see themselves in her. Shows the possible brilliance of INFJs. I saw her listed as a INTJ on a forum just the other day, and that's ridiculous-- she is an F, of course. Can you imagine a INTJ writing Persuasion? Or Mansfield Park? No no no...too many feelings, feelings too important and part of decision-making.

I read less myself these days, but miss it. There's hardly anyone for me to talk literature over with and it has nothing to do with my job.
"A Woman in Berlin" is well worth reaching for. There's a bit of some of the same questions as "Never Let me Go," in a way. Germany couldn't handle this book after the war-- they couldn't handle that these things had happened to their women, that the men had been powerless to stop it. Her honesty in showing how different people react to the worst of circumstances is just fascinating-- also brilliant writing. Plus all 100% true. She was a very accomplished journalist at the time it was all happening. It makes me feel connected to what happened to everyone then. Give it a go, let me know what you think. I was worried I'd be able to handle it. I can. Maya Angelou's "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" Was also good for me lately. I think reading true/real things that happened to people but with the benefit of being told through a beautiful mind with beautiful writing has been the best thing for me lately.
I will read your #1 book too--- grabbing it on Kindle.
 
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