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What is your top DISC style?

  • I am not an INFP! (you can still post your results in the comment section)

    Votes: 2 11.1%
  • Drive

    Votes: 4 22.2%
  • Influence

    Votes: 6 33.3%
  • Support

    Votes: 2 11.1%
  • Clarity

    Votes: 4 22.2%
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Discussion Starter #1
The DISC test determines what your behavioural style is most like. Take the test here: https://www.truity.com/test/disc-behavior-inventory


Drive

Drive describes behavior that is assertive and results-oriented. When people show Drive, they tend to take charge, make decisions, and control the direction of tasks and projects.

People who are highly Driven are described as assertive, dominant, competitive, and confident. They like to take decisive action and don't mind taking risks to get things done. They may be described as natural leaders.

Drive is useful in leadership positions as it helps to push to get the job done. However, it doesn't work as well for people who are in supporting roles. Highly Driven people may be frustrated in roles with no opportunity for leadership.


Influence

Influence describes behavior that is engaging and enthusiastic. When people show Influence, they reach out to other people to build a sense of excitement and fun. They inspire and persuade those around them.

People who are highly influential are described as warm, friendly, and sociable. They love to be around other people and get a "high" from connecting with a group. They have a natural charisma.

Influence is useful in roles that require you to persuade others. Teachers, salespeople, managers, and parents all benefit from a command of Influential behavior. Highly Influential people thrive on human connection, and tend to wither when they're forced to do isolated, impersonal tasks.


Support

Support describes behavior that is helpful and caring towards others. When people use Support, they notice what others need and look for ways to serve them. They are empathetic and compassionate.

People who are highly Supportive are described as kind, caring, and helpful. They rarely have their own agenda; rather, they prefer to help other people reach their goals. Very Supportive people spend much of their time caring for and serving others.

Support is useful in caretaking and helping roles. Nurses, parents, and assistants of all kinds tend to use a high degree of Supportive behavior. Highly Supportive people are less suited to roles where they must take command and make tough decisions.


Clarity

Clarity describes behavior that is precise and detail-oriented. When people exercise Clarity, they work steadily on tasks requiring focus and accuracy. They take a systematic approach to finish the job.

People who are high in Clarity are described as efficient, methodical, and orderly. They enjoy working independently on well-defined tasks with clear instructions and expectations. They place a lot of importance on getting everything done correctly.

Clarity is useful in roles where accuracy and precision are important. Accountants, engineers, and computer programmers all need to exercise Clarity to be successful in their work. On the other hand, high Clarity people generally prefer not to have to motivate other people.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Drive: 30%
Influence: 28%
Support: 15%
Clarity: 28%
 
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Drive 24%
Influence 17%
Support 17%
Clarity 41%

Not accurate, since i'm so scatterbrained that i can't focus at all, and i don't think i would like those jobs.
 

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I don't like tests that basically ask you to rate yourself on the very traits they claim that they will rate you on.

Are you assertive? The following will determine how assertive you are:

Assertive?
1. Very
2. Somewhat
3. Hardly
4. Never

How about being a little more clever than that?

If we knew ourselves that well, why would we need a test?
 

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MOTM January 2013
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21% Drive.

19% Influence.

27% Support.

32% Clarity.

People who are high in Clarity are described as efficient, methodical, and orderly. They enjoy working independently on well-defined tasks with clear instructions and expectations. They place a lot of importance on getting everything done correctly.
It's not so much doing every little thing correctly but doing it properly, where all the details are considered.
 

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Drive: 33%
Influence: 20%
Support: 28%
Clarity: 20%

So I must be enigma then xD I ranked highest in Drive, and second highest in Support, which apparently isn't so wonderful for those with high Drives. Then again, how do they measure what is considered a high Drive or any of the other categories? They don't tell us, so I wonder...

Either way, interesting test! Was certain I was going to rank lowest in Clarity, wasn't disappointed. xD
 

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I scored highest in influence, which is surprising, cause I would have pegged myself as a Support type. For me it was Influence>Support>Drive>Clarity
 

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Been taking this test since I was a young teen, I believe. Used to test as an I-C, now an I-D.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So far nobody has scored highest in "support". That is kind of surprising to me, as I thought INFPs would stereotypically rate higher there.
 

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I took this test a Long time ago, and think I came out as high S or C (I hate telling people what to do/influencing, and much prefer creating stuff or solving problems, so naturally I wouldn't test high on D or I :p).

I don't like the DISC model, since I frankly don't fit in any of the letters. All the jobs in the OP are jobs I would hate to have, and none of the descriptions encompass my work or behaviour style. I thought more INFPs would be able to relate, hmm... I am a very strong independent contributor, but the DISC model doesn't seem to take this into consideration. None of the descriptions can properly account for INxP types IMO.

Even though I "support", as in work from the background, I am not a people person. I don't like to serve others, and I teach with the goal for someone to become independent. In other words, I expect people to think for themselves first. I dislike when someone relies on me too much, and I am definitely not nurturing. But I do extend help where reasonable. I am decisive at work too, but I don't take on leadership roles because I don't like to become responsible for someone else's quality of work. I have perfectionistic tendencies too, and have very high standards for others' quality of work... but this is hard to balance out with my resistance towards telling people what to do.

As for Clarity, I like to work independently and can be meticulous, but thats about the only thing that fits. I am not methodological and tend to be a figure things out as I go kind of person. There is no structure to how I approach work and it can be hard for me to lay out a step by step manual for others. I can miss out details sometimes also, predominantly on things that are repetitive and painful like paperwork. I don't need instructions to function; most of the times I only require an end goal and general idea, and I can work from there. I deal well with ambiguity, and even prefer it - like how I don't like to instruct (maybe micromanaged is a better word), I don't like to be instructed/mictomanaged.

With this model, it feels like I'm just left dangling. Every type is a misrepresentation for me.
 

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Drive - 20%
Influence - 34%
Support - 28%
Clarity - 18%
 

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Drive - 26%
Influence - 19%
Support - 24%
Clarity - 31%

Important to note that if DISC is new to you, it originally stands for Dominant, Influential, Steady, and Conscientious.
 

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MOTM Dec 2011
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None of these sound like me. I scored evenly on them all, as a consequence.
My style is independent contributor - neither a team player nor a leader.
Im more creative and big picture than detail oriented.
Im exploratory not systematic.
Im too quiet and reserved to be inspirational.
Im not a supporter either, as described here. I don’t get a thrill from feeling needed nor do I anticipate needs. It’s not natural for me to be physically nurturing, although I am capable of it. I do like to teach and don’t mind helping people understand how stuff works, but I prefer for them to be independent and see it as helping them become so.

To me, it looks roughy like this:

Drive - TJs, some ExTPs
Inspire - ExxPs and ExFJs
Support - xxFJs, SFPs and maybe NFPs
Clarity - IxxJ and some IxTPs

I don’t feel like IxxPs have a clear fit. ExFPs and ExTPs might be inspirers, exhibiting more of their Pe. But there isn’t anything that really captures the IxxP style and mentality (which is heavily focused on auontomy but is usually more exploratory than systematic).
 
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I don't know what to vote; i scored nearly the same percentages on the four of them. Reading the descriptions nothing seems to fit me and my work behavior...
 

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INFP 4w5 6w7 9w1 so/sp
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Your DISC Scores

The following section explains how you scored for each of the four DISC behavioral styles.


Drive
About 7% of your behavior is characterized by Drive.

Drive describes behavior that is assertive and results-oriented. When people show Drive, they tend to take charge, make decisions, and control the direction of tasks and projects.

People who are highly Driven are described as assertive, dominant, competitive, and confident. They like to take decisive action and don't mind taking risks to get things done. They may be described as natural leaders.

Drive is useful in leadership positions as it helps to push to get the job done. However, it doesn't work as well for people who are in supporting roles. Highly Driven people may be frustrated in roles with no opportunity for leadership.


Influence
About 16% of your behavior is characterized by Influence.

Influence describes behavior that is engaging and enthusiastic. When people show Influence, they reach out to other people to build a sense of excitement and fun. They inspire and persuade those around them.

People who are highly influential are described as warm, friendly, and sociable. They love to be around other people and get a "high" from connecting with a group. They have a natural charisma.

Influence is useful in roles that require you to persuade others. Teachers, salespeople, managers, and parents all benefit from a command of Influential behavior. Highly Influential people thrive on human connection, and tend to wither when they're forced to do isolated, impersonal tasks.


Support
About 41% of your behavior is characterized by Support.

Support describes behavior that is helpful and caring towards others. When people use Support, they notice what others need and look for ways to serve them. They are empathetic and compassionate.

People who are highly Supportive are described as kind, caring, and helpful. They rarely have their own agenda; rather, they prefer to help other people reach their goals. Very Supportive people spend much of their time caring for and serving others.

Support is useful in caretaking and helping roles. Nurses, parents, and assistants of all kinds tend to use a high degree of Supportive behavior. Highly Supportive people are less suited to roles where they must take command and make tough decisions.


Clarity
About 36% of your behavior is characterized by Clarity.

Clarity describes behavior that is precise and detail-oriented. When people exercise Clarity, they work steadily on tasks requiring focus and accuracy. They take a systematic approach to finish the job.

People who are high in Clarity are described as efficient, methodical, and orderly. They enjoy working independently on well-defined tasks with clear instructions and expectations. They place a lot of importance on getting everything done correctly.

Clarity is useful in roles where accuracy and precision are important. Accountants, engineers, and computer programmers all need to exercise Clarity to be successful in their work. On the other hand, high Clarity people generally prefer not to have to motivate other people.
 


Using Your Results

Now that you know your DISC behavioral styles, what can you do about it?

The first step is to evaluate how your behavior is working for you in life and work. Do you often find that your approach to problems doesn't work well? Are you experiencing conflict with coworkers or loved ones?

If so, try to think about how your behavioral style might be affecting some of these issues. Can you identify a style that might work better?

Unlike personality, your behavior is flexible. If you find that your style isn't working for you, you can learn to adopt a new style. Some approaches will come more naturally to you than others, but you are always in control of your behavior.

For more information about DISC, we recommend The Essential DISC Training Workbook.
 

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Didn't vote because I'm not INFP.

I got a tie between Influence and Drive. But reading through Influence, I would at least like to think it fits me most. It's what I aspire to be/what I value most.
 

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Edgelord
INFP 5w4 - ILI - Chaotic Good
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1) Clarity
2) Support
3) Drive and Influence
 

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MOTM June 2012
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Your DISC ScoresThe following section explains how you scored for each of the four DISC behavioral styles.




Drive About 36% of your behavior is characterized by Drive.
Drive describes behavior that is assertive and results-oriented. When people show Drive, they tend to take charge, make decisions, and control the direction of tasks and projects.
People who are highly Driven are described as assertive, dominant, competitive, and confident. They like to take decisive action and don't mind taking risks to get things done. They may be described as natural leaders.
Drive is useful in leadership positions as it helps to push to get the job done. However, it doesn't work as well for people who are in supporting roles. Highly Driven people may be frustrated in roles with no opportunity for leadership.







InfluenceAbout 30% of your behavior is characterized by Influence.
Influence describes behavior that is engaging and enthusiastic. When people show Influence, they reach out to other people to build a sense of excitement and fun. They inspire and persuade those around them.
People who are highly influential are described as warm, friendly, and sociable. They love to be around other people and get a "high" from connecting with a group. They have a natural charisma.
Influence is useful in roles that require you to persuade others. Teachers, salespeople, managers, and parents all benefit from a command of Influential behavior. Highly Influential people thrive on human connection, and tend to wither when they're forced to do isolated, impersonal tasks.







SupportAbout 19% of your behavior is characterized by Support.
Support describes behavior that is helpful and caring towards others. When people use Support, they notice what others need and look for ways to serve them. They are empathetic and compassionate.
People who are highly Supportive are described as kind, caring, and helpful. They rarely have their own agenda; rather, they prefer to help other people reach their goals. Very Supportive people spend much of their time caring for and serving others.
Support is useful in caretaking and helping roles. Nurses, parents, and assistants of all kinds tend to use a high degree of Supportive behavior. Highly Supportive people are less suited to roles where they must take command and make tough decisions.







ClarityAbout 15% of your behavior is characterized by Clarity.
Clarity describes behavior that is precise and detail-oriented. When people exercise Clarity, they work steadily on tasks requiring focus and accuracy. They take a systematic approach to finish the job.
People who are high in Clarity are described as efficient, methodical, and orderly. They enjoy working independently on well-defined tasks with clear instructions and expectations. They place a lot of importance on getting everything done correctly.
Clarity is useful in roles where accuracy and precision are important. Accountants, engineers, and computer programmers all need to exercise Clarity to be successful in their work. On the other hand, high Clarity people generally prefer not to have to motivate other people.




Using Your ResultsNow that you know your DISC behavioral styles, what can you do about it?
The first step is to evaluate how your behavior is working for you in life and work. Do you often find that your approach to problems doesn't work well? Are you experiencing conflict with coworkers or loved ones?
If so, try to think about how your behavioral style might be affecting some of these issues. Can you identify a style that might work better?


Unlike personality, your behavior is flexible. If you find that your style isn't working for you, you can learn to adopt a new style. Some approaches will come more naturally to you than others, but you are always in control of your behavior.
 
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