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How often do you purchase organic food?

  • Regularly (several items weekly, and purchase it consciously)

    Votes: 78 20.9%
  • Occasionally (several items a month)

    Votes: 70 18.7%
  • On occasion (several items every few months, but it's not a very conscious decision)

    Votes: 64 17.1%
  • Very rarely (0-5 a year, or not if I can help it)

    Votes: 51 13.6%
  • I don't notice.

    Votes: 101 27.0%
  • I distrust organic food.

    Votes: 10 2.7%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There appears to be a lot of confusion about the relevance and regulation of organic food, and the real benefits of it (especially in relation to the sometimes greatly inflated price). I don't know popular organic food is in the US.

I'm curious how many of you purchase organic food?

(there are different legal definitions of what organic food actually is in different countries, but a basic definition is this;
Processed organic food usually contains only organic ingredients. If non-organic ingredients are present, at least a certain percentage of the food's total plant and animal ingredients must be organic (95% in the United States,[4] Canada, and Australia) and any non-organically produced ingredients are subject to various agricultural requirements. Foods claiming to be organic must be free of artificial food additives, and are often processed with fewer artificial methods, materials and conditions, such as chemical ripening, food irradiation, and genetically modified ingredients. Pesticides are allowed so long as they are not synthetic.

Early consumers interested in organic food would look for non-chemically treated, non-use of unapproved pesticides, fresh or minimally processed food. They mostly had to buy directly from growers: "Know your farmer, know your food" was the motto. Personal definitions of what constituted "organic" were developed through firsthand experience: by talking to farmers, seeing farm conditions, and farming activities. Small farms grew vegetables (and raised livestock) using organic farming practices, with or without certification, and the individual consumer monitored. As demand for organic foods continued to increase, high volume sales through mass outlets such as supermarkets rapidly replaced the direct farmer connection. Today there is no limit to organic farm sizes and many large corporate farms currently have an organic division. However, for supermarket consumers, food production is not easily observable, and product labeling, like "certified organic", is relied on. Government regulations and third-party inspectors are looked to for assurance.

The USDA carries out routine inspections of farms that produce USDA Organic labeled foods.[5] Of the 30 third party inspectors 15 of them have been placed under probation after an audit. On April 20, 2010, the Department of Agriculture said that it would begin enforcing rules requiring the spot testing of organically grown foods for traces of pesticides, after an auditor exposed major gaps in federal oversight of the organic food industry
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I try to buy organic regularly. I live in a rural area so there are lots of people selling goods at farmers' markets. Plus there are farmers that grow animals for meat using organic feed (grass and weeds).
 

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I stick to buying fresh produce from farmers markets. I don't support big business much.
 

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I make my choices based on what I want/need first, price second, local third. If organic foodstuffs happen to satisfy those requirements then I buy. I don't make a special effort or budget for it.
 

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I buy local and organic whenever I can. It doesn't happen regularly, but I'm not the regular shopper in my household.
 

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I buy organic when it seems reasonable to. There are a lot of local farmer's markets where organic is not that expensive, and the produce TASTES better. Trader Joe's often has a decent selection in organic food, and it's really not expensive.

However, I don't only buy organic, and if it comes down to buying food that is not organic but much cheaper, allowing me to eat better in general, then I will do so. Generally, I prefer to buy foods that are not overly processed or have a ton of preservatives, organic or not. I tend to look for labels which have ingredients that are real food (these tend to be shorter in length). Sometimes, these just so happen to be organic. I can see why people get skeptical about the organic label though...I think it's important to read labels & see exactly what is meant by "organic".

Anyway, I prefer what I do because I have GERD. I find none of the foods suggested to irritate my condition actually do (ie. coffee), but heavily processed food or food with a lot of preservatives will cause me PAIN. The fresher, more natural the food is, the better I digest it. I am NOT fanatical though. I take a moderate approach to this also.

I actually featured an article in this community magazine I created (short-lived venture...) about a local organic market that was opening. I went to a local farm & interviewed the guy, as well as the owner of the market who was involved in the slow foods movement. Her goal was to have a market where all the food came from within a 100 mile radius, and it had to be organic. By keeping it local, it kept prices down. The market also only makes money by renting space to farmers/food producers, so the food does not have to be marked up as much (grocery stores charge for product space & take part of the profit of the items sold). It was basically the farmer's market concept brought indoors. Anyway, I learned a lot about organic food, the food industry, and ways people are trying to revamp it to make food healthier, tastier, but still affordable.
 

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Very rarely. I live in a rural area and grow my own vegetables in the summer, and I get a lot of fruits and eggs from friends who grow or raise their own.

Everything else I buy from the store, and I don't pay extra for organic. Farmer's market are nice, but I usually feel like doing something else on a Saturday morning.

Friends of mine, who work in agriculture, have told me that once the organic produce leaves the field, there are no regulations, and they sometimes spray them with chemicals in the truck to prevent bruising. Not sure if this is true, but it's enough to discourage me from shelling out extra cash for organic.
 

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I buy it whenever possible, and i adjust my cooking habits to accommodate what's local and organic and in season. I also cut corners in other parts of my budget so i don't have to sacrifice on the quality of my food. Purchased food comes in varying degrees of scariness, and lots of times even stuff labeled as organic is still a little bit sketch in origin. I really just always buy the least-tainted highest quality stuff i can find/afford.
 

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Too expensive... plus, I don't eat fruits and vegetables enough for it to really matter one way or the other.
 

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Just because something is organic does not mean it's the best for you. I do like to get organic if I can help it, but you can't really tell a difference between the two if you were to do a taste test. A good organic and almost always vegan brand of foods that I highly recommend, is Amy's.
 

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I try to buy as much organic food as I can, provided it's not too expensive. Unfortunately it isn't always easy to find, and often is too expensive, so I don't buy as much as I would if I had the money for it. Strangely, I ate more organic food when I was very poor, and lived in a place where it was abundant and less expensive :unsure:
 
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