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do you have a job?
if yes: what is that? if no: me neither

and do you think it's easy to get a job?

+ do you have any tips for me?

it's not even that i want a job i just want a work placement! working for FREE, but noooo i cannot find one... should i give up working forever???? I SURE FEEL LIKE IT!!!

FROM THE MOMEMT I FELL DOWN THAT RABBIT-HOLE I HAVE BEEN TOLD WHAT TO DO AND WHO I MUST BE!!!! - i feel like alice in wonderland

im not "much" to my environment, i have either a) lost my muchness or b) never had it
 

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I have worked in a national call centre for two years and a catastrophe would be the best word to describe it. My company provides "emergency" services in various trades of plumbing, electrical repair or glass replacement for whichever poor saps call up when life throws them an unfortunate hand of misfortune. I am one of the minions, a finger on the right hand of the company which is pointed at and told what to do without free will. They dictate and I follow, or at least I'm supposed to. I'm infamous for being a bit of a loose cannon there, I wouldn't call my company the most principled of institutions and I often rebel against the chain of command (secretly of course) when my Fi orders me to. They tell me I'm doing it wrong, they say there is only one way to do things (even though its time consuming and not customer focused?) so I agree and then feel inclined to do as I see is best/most just when their back is turned. Whats worse is most of the time they don't even realise I'm doing things my way. Perhaps they don't realise I can't bring myself to respect rules I don't agree with simply because I have an "idiots face" and I come across as a bit distant and even stupid. Apparently having your shirt out or shoe laces undone and being too deep in fantasy land to notice makes someone untidy and scruffy or rebellious. I agree with the rebellious and defiant part.

Another observation I have noticed is that the place is in absolute chaos. Offices are characterised as the paradigm for order and efficiency (especially with ESTJs usually running the show) but my experiences are different. Mistakes slipping through and building up one on top of the other by everyone in the office (often to disaster!) makes the places seem more like its made from a house of cards and often to a dark comedic effect. The system they use is inefficient but the best one they could make, however its designed so its perhaps impossible to control the influx of calls. I have a mind which seems good at seeing and chaos and is quick to pick up on a situation that is going to hell so I see them try and control it with consistenty short term and small solutions to much larger problems. On the bright side though, its been an interesting sociology experiment and has become the foundation for all my theories of the universe (I'm a strong believer in the chaos theory now.)

Forgive the long post there but it comes down to the person. Other introverts work in call centres so perhaps it is easy, perhaps not. Usually its quite easy, especially sales. If a cust wants something enough then they would probably say yes. But if they want to complain then expect to be treated as an avatar for the company instead of a poor sap answering the phone. I've become so bored or depressed I've even tried to type customers on the phone (a lady this afternoon may have been an NF.) But on the bright side it gives you a feeling that you're doing something fulfilling my helping others and teaches you about the outside world.

As for how easy to get a job, then the question is how hard do you want to look? Do you live in a city or the country? How many jobs would you be willing to try your hand at? My first job was found by doing a temp job through a recruitment company so they are good to help get on the ladder. But if you don't want to work then don't let others look down on you for doing so. Unemployment has ways of lowering your self-respect and people don't realise you may be dealing with overpowering personal demons whilst "claiming welfare."

My final advice is: Use an unpleasant job as a stepping stone. Focus on what you want to do instead and be a servant entirely for a means to an end as you work towards that goal. Don't lose hope in yourself (believe in the optimism of the Ne over the pessimism of the Si) or you'll wake up and find that you've been doing jobs you hate for four years, like me! Don't let not having a job make you feel you're worth nothing to the world either, I feel like I'm worth nothing to the world or others either despite the usual rhethoric on "good stats" or being the "office legend" which I hear when I'm there. Aim for the highest peak so your life feels validated and so you can feel you are "much" to your environment.
 

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I'm a stay at home mom. And yes, getting it was the easiest (and most fun) part. :wink:

(I'm going to assume that you are living in the US and between the ages of 16-22. If I'm incorrect, skip the next paragraph. :happy: )

Seriously though, I think it's harder now for teenagers/young adults to get a job. Mostly because that age demographic are the entry-level workers and due to the economy sucking, a lot of older adults have had to take on a second (or third) job and they are often an entry-level job. Older workers will usually have a good track record when it comes to job performance and are favored over younger workers who haven't had the opportunity to prove themselves.

Do you have the option of utilizing a staffing company? That could be a good way for you to find a reputable employer.
 

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I completely understand. I do have a job, but it's not something to be proud of, and I sort of feel betrayed by the values I've chosen to live my life by. Do well in school, go to college, get involve, graduate with honors, and then..... all for what?

I feel like for INFPs, we may take it a little too hard. I agree with Ectoplasm when he says to start small. I actually would highly reccommend that if you have the financial support of your parents etc, or are living at home, that you start volunteering somewhere you feel is working for a good cause. That's how I started. If you volunteer it still looks good on a resume (not as good as a job, but still good). From internships, you can sometimes get jobs, and when you are working in these positions you are really making a difference. ;D Just make sure you talk to people and make connections wherever you go. I have to force myself to give people my e-mail and phone number because getting a job these days is all about connections. You ARE worth it, and people WANT to hire you. We are hard workers and wonderful people. it just kinda sucks to be an introvert sometimes.

Until the economy turns around, that's about the best advice I can give. :(
 

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(I had a job. Once. When I was thirteen. I knocked on random people's doors and sold them the sunday edition of this newspaper that I don't really even read myself. Only once though. And it rained. And some people were mean. And others were too nice. And I was miserable. And when I got home I vowed that I would never have a job again. Not in that manner. Ever.

So now I'm going to the university, next year, and on the side I'm going to write a book. And then I'm going to get absurdly rich, and never have to break my vow. That's pretty much my relationship to jobs. I guess.

Wish me luck. @[email protected])
 

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Right now its really hard to find a job in my town. I got lucky and a friend of mine worked at a hotel so I got hired there and I still work there.

My advice is apply everywhere, don't lie on the applications, and be yourself when you get an interview.
 
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