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Discussion Starter #1
I have a small collection of Agatha Christie books and the only reason I read them is to see if I can solve them before Poirot does, lol. (Sherlock Holmes is too easy :laughing:)
It started when I solved "Death on the Nile", and (possibly due to the sudden shock of vanity to my system) I was hooked. :crazy:

People DO NOT find it endearing when my Fe ruins their movies either!

Do other INFJs find intellectual pleasure from solving mystery books??
Have you solved any? If so, which one(s)?
 

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yes, and its sad
I wanted to write a book about it. oh, and in movies... criminal movies, tv-shows etc. I know it, mostly, at least into the half of the show/movie :/ So I look for books/movies with surprises
 

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Throughout my reading of the first Sherlock Holmes volume, I found myself attempting to clue into the minute, easily overlooked details that I knew Holmes would bring together in his conclusion later in the story.
Through Sherlock Holmes and the Agatha Christie novels I've read (I believe I have at least 12 of hers) I've gotten better at educated guesses. I like her stories with Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple too!
But I've a funny story. I've forgotten what the name of the book was, but a friend of mine once described to me the storyline of a book she was reading about a girl whose friends and loved ones were mysteriously dying around her and the culprit kept leaving clues so as to let the protagonist know, she would inevitably die.
So I asked my friend, "And the girl doesn't know the culprit?" My friend said, "No."
I answered, "Is it herself?" My friend stared.
Just the next day, she comes in and gives me a chagrined look. "You ruined the book! She had a split personality!" she says.
I stared. Hence, my fascination with mystery novels and intuition began.
Just the next year, I took a Psych class, learned about personality theories and didn't look back!
Has anyone watched the following: Lie to Me, House, Criminal Minds, The Mentalist?
They're a feast for the overactive mind! :)
 

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I think, the most important information I got... for a book or a movie was the term
Chekhov's Gun - Television Tropes & Idioms (and other "Chekhov's")
after this, everything became way too clear for me

and "we have the killer" etc and the movie still runs 20mins^^ -> no, you havent the killer...^^
 
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Discussion Starter #5
I think, the most important information I got... for a book or a movie was the term
Chekhov's Gun - Television Tropes & Idioms (and other "Chekhov's")
after this, everything became way too clear for me

and "we have the killer" etc and the movie still runs 20mins^^ -> no, you havent the killer...^^
I was wondering if you'd comment, given your signature's Sherlock Holmes quote.

"The Sign of Four" was one of those that I don't think one could ever solve because it didn't introduce the villain until the end.
Bah! It's CHEATING! Lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Throughout my reading of the first Sherlock Holmes volume, I found myself attempting to clue into the minute, easily overlooked details that I knew Holmes would bring together in his conclusion later in the story.
Through Sherlock Holmes and the Agatha Christie novels I've read (I believe I have at least 12 of hers) I've gotten better at educated guesses. I like her stories with Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple too!
But I've a funny story. I've forgotten what the name of the book was, but a friend of mine once described to me the storyline of a book she was reading about a girl whose friends and loved ones were mysteriously dying around her and the culprit kept leaving clues so as to let the protagonist know, she would inevitably die.
So I asked my friend, "And the girl doesn't know the culprit?" My friend said, "No."
I answered, "Is it herself?" My friend stared.
Just the next day, she comes in and gives me a chagrined look. "You ruined the book! She had a split personality!" she says.
I stared. Hence, my fascination with mystery novels and intuition began.
Just the next year, I took a Psych class, learned about personality theories and didn't look back!
Has anyone watched the following: Lie to Me, House, Criminal Minds, The Mentalist?
They're a feast for the overactive mind! :)

Wow, I got 1/2 way through reading your description of that book and I came to the same conclusion! LOL!
Have you ever read the Poirot "The Murder of Roger Ackroyd"? That's my all time favorite because I was fooled completely.

Yeah, Lie to Me rocked. I think it got cancelled though! (Jerks) I think Lightman is an INFJ. He's a little confrontational, but he had a rough childhood, and he uses Fe which means that he's not INTJ. (Though he could be a composite).
House on the other hand is INTJ.

Love those shows.
 

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I was wondering if you'd comment, given your signature's Sherlock Holmes quote.

"The Sign of Four" was one of those that I don't think one could ever solve because it didn't introduce the villain until the end.
Bah! It's CHEATING! Lol.
yes. I think, Doyle wanted "just close that story"^^. I enjoy "evil mastermind"-plots, they are often full of surprises. or books of Mr. Pynchon o_O
 

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Wow, I got 1/2 way through reading your description of that book and I came to the same conclusion! LOL!
Have you ever read the Poirot "The Murder of Roger Ackroyd"? That's my all time favorite because I was fooled completely.

Yeah, Lie to Me rocked. I think it got cancelled though! (Jerks) I think Lightman is an INFJ. He's a little confrontational, but he had a rough childhood, and he uses Fe which means that he's not INTJ. (Though he could be a composite).

Love those shows.

Did you really?! That's cool! Lie To Me was a unique INFJ and all other Intuitive Types binge-a-thon of mental stimulation. I'm appalled that they got rid of it. He may well be a composite, because he has to be forceful (like House, who believes all people lie) in order to get to the truth.
I actually JUST got The Death of Roger Ackroyd last year, so I must read through it!

Topic Related: Three Blind Mice and other stories by Agatha Christie, Halloween, And Then There Were None, The Seven Dials Mystery, Endless Night (Shocked me!) are all puzzling enough but I think the practiced, analytic mind could really appreciate and enjoy!
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Did you really?! That's cool! Lie To Me was a unique INFJ and all other Intuitive Types binge-a-thon of mental stimulation. I'm appalled that they got rid of it. He may well be a composite, because he has to be forceful (like House, who believes all people lie) in order to get to the truth.
I actually JUST got The Death of Roger Ackroyd last year, so I must read through it!

Topic Related: Three Blind Mice and other stories by Agatha Christie, Halloween, And Then There Were None, The Seven Dials Mystery, Endless Night (Shocked me!) are all puzzling enough but I think the practiced, analytic mind could really appreciate and enjoy!
I totally want to do an film adaptation of And Then There Were None.
Have more back story. I even picked out the "dream" cast to play it! Lol!

I haven't read any of the others you mentioned, though.
Was "Endless Night" a stand alone thing?
 

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I totally want to do an film adaptation of And Then There Were None.
Have more back story. I even picked out the "dream" cast to play it! Lol!

I haven't read any of the others you mentioned, though.
Was "Endless Night" a stand alone thing?
Really? I'd back that endeavor! I'm a rabid film nut as well as a book romantic.
"Endless Night" is interesting because of a significant voice change in the writing. It goes from omniscient point of view to first person and so naturally you're persuaded to trust the character. What is it with us assuming a main character is sympathetic?
It's basically a supernatural mystery thriller, though the "supernatural" aspect gets broken down as you go along. It persuades you to forget your detective skills and go along with it...then BOOM!
Deviating from classic mystery writing, have you read We Need to Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver? It'll make you clench your stomach, raise your hackles, etc. It is essentially a mystery/family drama both raw and bold. The heart of the mystery is that the events have already happened and there is nothing to solve. It's like someone is choosing to relive and retrace the tell-tale signs of what went wrong in certain freeze frames of memory, knowing full well it will not change what inevitably happened. Incredible writing, highly recommended!
 
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Really? I'd back that endeavor! I'm a rabid film nut as well as a book romantic.
"Endless Night" is interesting because of a significant voice change in the writing. It goes from omniscient point of view to first person and so naturally you're persuaded to trust the character. What is it with us assuming a main character is sympathetic?
It's basically a supernatural mystery thriller, though the "supernatural" aspect gets broken down as you go along. It persuades you to forget your detective skills and go along with it...then BOOM!
Deviating from classic mystery writing, have you read We Need to Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver? It'll make you clench your stomach, raise your hackles, etc. It is essentially a mystery/family drama both raw and bold. The heart of the mystery is that the events have already happened and there is nothing to solve. It's like someone is choosing to relive and retrace the tell-tale signs of what went wrong in certain freeze frames of memory, knowing full well it will not change what inevitably happened. Incredible writing, highly recommended!
I'm not terribly well versed with this stuff.
I totally need to read more.

I'll check it out, though!

I like intellectual stuff.
 

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My ENFJ boyfriend does that a lot and announces it outloud. It really irritates me, haha.
To me, the whole point of a suspenseful book or movie or a plot twist is to be surprising.
I will even make the conscious effort to make myself NOT try to figure it out, because once I know the ending, it's ruined for me and I don't see the point in finishing the story.
I enjoy being surprised. I don't want to kill it.
 

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To me, the whole point of a suspenseful book or movie or a plot twist is to be surprising.
I will even make the conscious effort to make myself NOT try to figure it out, because once I know the ending, it's ruined for me and I don't see the point in finishing the story.
I enjoy being surprised. I don't want to kill it.
I try to dull my senses when it comes to film too. But the only reason I have interest in reading mystery books IS to solve it first.
The mystery isn't fun unless you do! It's also much more challenging because our Se and Fe are completely neutralized by the fact that it's on paper, not viscerally in front of us. This leaves our Ni/Ti alone... In their purest form to solve the problem... It's beauty...
(Now I'm talking like Sherlock! Lol)
 

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