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Besides English, how many foreign languages do you already know how to speak, read, write, and/or understand? Also, which is your favorite language (if you have one), and why? Otherwise, which languages would you like to learn in the future, and why?

What is your MBTI type, and how do you think the concept of language/linguistics ties to your type?
 

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English is my other language. I also know bits of Japanese, but I haven't really put effort into learning it.

My favorite language is actually Korean. I studied it a bit and I really like the sound of it and how the words and phrases are structured. I didn't go as far as learning it because I didn't see the point, but I plan to do that before I die. It shouldn't be difficult as both Japanese and Korean share numerous similarities to the language I have been speaking since I was a kid — Not to mention, learning English wasn't that difficult for me and the language is nothing like what I was used to. I do have to admit my English pronunciation still leaves to be desired, though, but it is because of lack of practice mostly.

I don't know my type.
 

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I'm not sure of my type but I speak French. I wouldn't say I'm fluent but I've been pretty comfortable with conversational french for years now and the majority of my classes throughout elementary school to graduating high school where in French. Learning a new language is one of the hardest thing I've done and I started young! I respect anyone who can manage to speak multiple languages on a regular basis, it's cool.
 

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I speak English, some German, pretty good Russian, and mediocre Spanish. I don't know if I have a favorite language, but despite the stereotypes of German being a harsh and aggressive language, I actually find German poetry really beautiful. Hands down my favorite language to sing in is Russian; there's just something about those rich, dark vowels that's very satisfying to sing.
I'm an Isfp. Not sure if that has any effect on my language skills, though I can learn a good amount of a foreign language just through passive absorption. I don't study grammar charts or anything. My approach is to go on youtube and listen to videos with subtitles to get a feel for the flow/pronunciation of a language and then memorize a shitton of vocabulary. Most people say they can read in a foreign language but can't speak it. For me, it's the opposite. I'm great at the verbal aspect of languages but I suck at reading in a foreign language. The problem is that once I become fluent in a language, I become too lazy to maintain it and forget everything just as quickly as I learned it.
 

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English and Shanghainese - Fluent
Mandarin - Broken speech, can understand, read a bit
Japanese - Can read (except for some kanji), conversational speech
Korean - Can read

I’m good at learning new alphabets. Just do repetitive exercises until it’s drilled in.
Vocab and grammar is all about memorisation and understanding the logical structure. I also find it helpful to watch shows in that specific language to familiarise yourself with the general flow, and that way grammar structures come more naturally.
 

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I used to study Spanish a little bit every day for a year. I only got to about moderate proficiency, but that may or may not be me being a tad charitable towards myself. It did start to get to the point where my own native language started looking weird to me, my spelling started to get a little bit messed up because of getting used to how phonetic Spanish is, accidental tongue rolls while speaking English started to happen (one happened just yesterday actually) and I had a couple moments where I'd be studying and mix up my words or mash two words together into one (ex. I once wrote "interesanting" instead of "interesting" or "interesante"). I had another mix up once due to taking a lesson or two in German and French while I was taking a Spanish test. I got a question wrong because I gave the right word, just not in the right language (it was either the French or German equivalent?). I also at the very least might still be able to read Cyrillic letters.

The foreign language bug really had bitten me back then. Then for some dumb reason I lost interest and stopped studying for two years. I think I might have tried to keep my interest at first by starting some courses on Portuguese because I figured it would be easy because of having similarities to Spanish and maybe even help with my Spanish learning, but I lost interest in it early on. Recently I've been trying to properly get back into it again by trying to learn Korean and I'd maybe want to try Arabic one day.

I'm some kind of feeling type. I think my interest in foreign languages has to do with a few things:

- Learning a little bit about where the languages come from, culture, etc or I guess just to learn in general.

- Maybe a little bit of a dislike of my own native language(?) I might grow to appreciate it more in time. I have tendencies in general towards liking and being more drawn towards unfamiliarity than familiarity.

- I like pronouncing the words. It just feels nice.

My reasons may or may not be reminiscient of a certain type or two.
 

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English is my second language (French my first).

And yes, I think as a Si-Dom, exposing yourself to another language long enough will make you pick it up piece by piece and in time, fully integrate it. You have to devote a shitload of time to it however. It took me years of movies, TV shows, video games etc. Learning a foreign language is probably of the of the endeavors that require the most patience and focus on details more than anything I can think of.

I see a lot of SPs being pretty good with other languages too for some reason, I can only surmize that by their natural ability adapt to real time, they sorta instinctively know how to communicate their point on the spot. Just don't expect them to bog down on the grammar and details though...
 

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I write and speak English and Dutch fluently. I understand german writing but can't keep up with the talking most of the times, same with french. I also can speak some basic things in french and german.
 

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I am trilingual. I am fluent in speaking, reading, and writing in three languages. English is my second language. I took a few years of schooling to learn Spanish. If I brushed up on Spanish, that would make it 4 languages. I watch plenty of movies/shows in Mandarin and Korean. I've been doing this for a long time now and I've had an interest in these cultures (as well as being surrounded by it), so it wouldn't require a lot of effort and pushing for me to master these two languages either. After mastering these three languages, I'd like to pick up on French. Learning different languages has never been an extreme obstacle for me. Like what has been said, after your second language, learning additional languages becomes easier. Languages and cultures go hand in hand. When you learn the language, you learn how the people view things. You see things from a different angle.

I don't think the concept of languages/linguistics ties into MBTI. I've seen similar threads of the same topic. I'm surprised no one has mentioned that there are many countries and places in the world where you literally cannot survive without knowing more than one language. It's not an option; It's an absolute must. You must know how to communicate with others to go places, to do things, to work, etc. In many places, they have their own native/tribal tongue, then there's the country/national tongue(s). Many places are bombarded with tourists, so the natives pick up on English, French or other languages so they can accommodate the tourists.
 

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I learned to speak English from a young age despite having no real reason, living in a non-English speaking environment that really doesn't place much pressure at all on learning other languages. Other than that and my native tongue of course, I tried picking up Japanese and French on a whim in recent years. I had no real necessity to do so, however, and my interests shifted to other things before I could make substantial progress. I did get further on Japanese than I did French; I can read both hiragana and katakana, and also like a dozen kanji. My vocabulary is comparable to that of a toddler, honestly.

With French, figuring out the pronunciation took half of my brainpower, I admit.

EDIT: An addition that I just came to realize: Japanese syntax and grammar were really easy for me to grasp. Despite it being considerably different than both English and Portuguese(my native tongue), I had no problem understanding and using the straightforward and context-dependant shape of Japanese sentences. I even find myself thinking in the language, mixing my barebones Japanese vocabulary with English words to fill in the void. Maybe that implies something? I don't know, but it's still interesting enough data to put out there.
 

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I can make myself understood in three languages total (Finnish, English, Swedish). This goes all the way from understanding fairly technical/detailed vocab to being able to explain things and understand most of the things expressed to me in everyday communication. My issue is that I have attempted several others (French, Greek, Spanish, Italian & Russian) without mastering any of them due to lack of discipline and just general overwhelmingness of grammar.

How my type might influence it; when I reach for le mot juste it may not be the most accurate or precise one but the one that feels right in the moment to convey the message, with nuance going into the meaning, interpretation and intent more so than technicalities... so less about going by what the dictionary says and more "how will these words be taken in -- by whoever is listening?" That said, I would prefer to use a word in the form that is comes to mind, be it in whatever language in that specific moment, as it seems poetic and fitting and expressive and descriptive to do so... the downside is that each word in a sentence can emerge in a different language. Then truly it takes a translator to figure out what is exactly being said. So I try and resist the temptation to do so as it might confuse others as well as myself.

Plus I find some languages more liberating or suitable for expressing something specific. I see different "purposes" or natures to them. Russian requires a whole different way of thinking because time and actions are understood differently... English has the greatest selection of words to choose from and each has a pretty precise meaning to it so it is great if you want to be specific... Finnish has a relatively free way to organize a sentence so you can just say and write however you want so it is naturally great.. etc.
 

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I know American Sign Language and French. I really want to learn Spanish and maybeee... an Eastern European language one day? Ooh, and Chinese.

As an ISFP, I think I really like observing the physical differences between languages (like, the "vibe" each of them give off... if that makes sense), and how they're similar/different.
 
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