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No, but I've been thinking about it a lot lately, actually. I would love to donate my time and effort to a good cause.

The main reason I haven't yet is that I'm not sure which organizations are actually worth supporting. I'll be stalking this thread to get some info for myself if you don't mind! :laughing:

Hope you get lots of replies from people who have done this!
 

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I work with Girls, Inc. for a service learning class. I really like working with the girls. They're really sweet.
 

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Crisis Line,

It's an interesting switch because I'm definitely a bit of a forceful advice giver. On "the line" though, I have to take a very passive stance and help with self discovery. If the director catches me giving advice to anyone calling in, I'll get reamed out hard. This extends to people even asking for my opinion, I have to deflect it back.

Enjoyable? Sometimes based on the stance above, you don't accomplish much with certain callers. Other times, you will get a tremendous amount of thank yous and brightened spirits from the caller. That makes it all worth it. Beyond this all though, it furthers my behavioral psychology experience which plays a clever game of mind reading in real life.

How did I get there? Related to policing and my degree -- cop friend recommended it.
 

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Crisis Line,

It's an interesting switch because I'm definitely a bit of a forceful advice giver. On "the line" though, I have to take a very passive stance and help with self discovery. If the director catches me giving anyone advice to people calling in, I'll get reamed out hard. This extends to people even asking for my opinion, I have to deflect it back.
That must be a bit of a challenge, considering the forcefulness.

I don't do any work for non-profit yet, but the places I'm applying to next spring are animal shelters, a concert hall and community clean-up efforts in the area for non-profit.
 

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No, but I've been thinking about it a lot lately, actually. I would love to donate my time and effort to a good cause.

The main reason I haven't yet is that I'm not sure which organizations are actually worth supporting. I'll be stalking this thread to get some info for myself if you don't mind! :laughing:

Hope you get lots of replies from people who have done this!
Yup, that's the reason I started this thread! I am looking to do some volunteer work and can't decide on an organization. I'm having a hard time finding out what my likes/dislikes are in a career, so I am considering volunteering to gain proffessional experience and do a little career exploration while I try to go back to college.

I've got so many interests right now in non-profit. I found that United Way (USA) has great links and online databases of volunteer positions. I've been looking at nature centers, the Boy Scouts of America, local parks, literacy organizations, and this really cool community Christmas organization that helps to bring in toys and clothing for those that need them in my area. I can't decide...there are so many fun opportunities!!! :confused:
 

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I work for a non-profit community based mental health center. Actually, both my psychiatric nursing jobs that I have had were for non-profit organizations. The pay is crap (at least $2-5 less than what I could get working in a nursing home and double that for hospital work prior to shift-differential being added) but I love it. I work with the people that the rest of society has forgotten or has intentionally tried to ignore and shove off. Basically, I am one of the few people that they encounter in their lives who actually cares about them. And care I do, sometimes too much, but it also makes me good at my job.

A little bit about the patients I work with. The "easiest" cases only have depression and/or anxiety. They can be usually be helped with a bit of therapy and some medication as needed. Then you started adding PTSD from incredibly dysfunctional "family" as they grew up that would include many things that I won't actually mention here because it could possibly trigger someone reading. Then you have the people with a bipolar disorder who's highs and lows are enough to get them placed in a hospital or psychiatric hospital. Very sad cases. Which are overshadowed by the schizophrenia patients, most of whom have an anxiety or mood disorder as well. Most of them, if they hear voices, do not hear pleasant things at all. :-(

That's just a quick overview of the typical population I work with. It's hard work, but oh so very worth it. Especially when I can see someone once a month for a long-acting injection and hear how absolutely normal his life is and that he's never felt better in his entire life. And this has been for over six months now with absolutely no evidence that it will change. Or my patient who went from using alcohol, cocaine and heroin in some combination nearly daily to being clean and sober for 5 months, able to handle her anxiety even when it is overwhelming her senses, and using all her newfound DBT skills to manage nightmares/terrors, depression, and cravings. It makes me so very happy to see the progress and know that they will be taken care of and are going to be okay.
 

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Faeriegal, that is a wonderful thing to do. I have a special frequency in my heart for those with mental disorders, because I have experienced it myself, and I know how the isolation effect can take place. Thank you for caring for them and putting your energy into that. What kind of success rate would you say that place you work for has, if it is possible to estimate?

As for myself, I work for a non-profit community bakery/restaurant. It was a "regular" bakery/restaurant previously, but because the owner had a vision to use the business for community outreach, and to be a place that provides spiritual and physical healing, he recognized there were advantages to being a non-profit business...apparently it allows more freedom to implement those plans. For instance, being non-profit makes it possible to hire people specifically because they are on board with the vision of the outreach goals, whereas a normal business could be called out for discrimination in such a case.

I originally became part of it 2 1/2 years ago because I became a friend of the owner before he turned it non-profit. I worked there on and off, and during that time there have been different outreach programs, but the owner's life has been too hectic and scattered to really allow this business to take off, so a new owner is coming in next week, and I am looking forward to that. The goals are: providing health knowledge for the community through different means, having regular community Bible studies that focus on health and healing, possibly cooking classes, etc... we'll see what this new owner has in mind.
 

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I would like to help stray animals through some local organizations but unfortunately I don't have the time right now. I will definitely do it sometime in the future though. I'm not sure I would like to work voluntarily for humans, it's just doesn't seem that it will be appreciated.
 

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I currently volunteer for a lot of my time to a non-profit called buildOn, an after-school program that helps build schools in developing countries while empowering high school students locally (I can't believe I remembered all of that from their posters). I would be excited at the thought of working there but I am required to have a bachelor's degree and a little more extraversion on my part. I enjoy it because like an Infp description says, I enjoy the thought of "serving humanity". Doing it is one of the most fulfilling things I could do. The people there are just great to work with (I even know all of their mbti since they took an official test. It's also great to see high school students again, reminds me of old times as well as seeing the next generation. I first joined them while I was in high school because I simply needed service learning hours. I then decided to volunteer at their office after graduation because I had trouble finding a job. If I were paid to do this, I'd probably be set for life.:proud: I will say that I'm probably not the manager type, I tend to just work alongside people.
 

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Great Thread!

I currently work for 3 non-profits (2 community sector & 1 performing arts) and participate unpaid in another couple.

In the community sector, I work as a Finance Worker (strange for an INFP, I know) for Young Parents Program (YPP) 2 days a week and Women's Health (WH) 3 days a week. Both these organisations are small and independant (not a part of any religious or other group). I LOVE the small sector! Whilst it definitely has its trials, the beauty of it is the relative lack of bureaucracy, the fact that the workplace can be built on relationships (especially YPP, where there are only 6 permanent staff), and that innovative responses to individual women (service users, participants, "clients" - though I hate that word...) are often easier to implement - due to the lack of internal bureacracy, no doubt!

In the performing arts sector, I work as a singer in the state opera chorus. It's casual contract work (there's only 3 operas per year), but we're paid to do a job we love. I love this work. If there were more of it, I'd want to be doing it.

Unpaid, I'm on the finance sub-committee of my local Community Development Association (I used to work here - only 4 hours a week - but had to give this up to find more hours to fund my house renovation) and participate in various things that happen there - such as indigenous reconciliation events. I also spent a lot of time in 2008 and 2009 on a community garden planning committee (connected to the community development assoc). And after a year of meetings, standing in front of supermarkets (talking only to those who talked to us first), leaflet delivery (of the non emotionally manipulative sort), door-knocking the locals (in a developmental and non-threatening way) and arguing with the local government Councillor (using our best "reasonable" voices), there IS A Community Garden!

(This is turning into a long post...)

How did I get into all of this? Well...
I kind of "fell" into the community sector. I'd been working at a music school teaching singing and doing administration where I'd learnt a bit about a computerised accounting package. I left the music school and was looking for work that would allow me a bit of time flexibility around the rehearsals, coachings and language classes etc that I was taking. The small community sector was happy to allow that flexibility (because they're about supporting people to live the lives they want to live, I guess), so that's where I ended up working. That was over 10 years ago.

The opera company involves maintaining your vocal ability and auditioning every other year. A lot of work, but we have such fun!

I love working in this sector. It has truly enriched my life. The sector is not without its problems, but overall it is filled with people who want the best for others. It's a great place to work.

OK. I'll stop now. :laughing:
 
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