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What I mean by the question above is that does anyone else think the 2000's were the last decade wear Generation X were still a big target for Pop Culture?

I know most people consider the 90's the last Generation X decade and lump them in with the 80's, just like how people always lump in the 60's and 70's together as the Baby Boomer's "time," but I've always thought of it the complete opposite. To me the 70's and 80's were when Baby Boomers were the main target for Pop Culture while the 90's and the 2000's will be seen as the time when Generation X was still the main target for Pop Culture. The Late 90's and very early 2000's were still largely Generation X even with stuff like Britney Spears and boy bands are being popular. Sure the oldest Millennials might have been teenagers or young adults and were old enough to start enjoying and taking over Pop Culture and the oldest Xers were mostly too old for Pop Culture by this point, but that doesn't mean all Generation X culture died out suddenly and Millennials completely took over pop culture.

In fact I see the Early-to-Mid 2000's as the peak era for Generation X culture. Most of the bands, singers, sports athletes, actors, actresses, and comedians that were popular back then were Generation Xers and were the main driving force behind Pop Culture.
 

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Ah, no. The 2000s were solidly Millennial culture. The only aspect of pop culture which still appealed to Gen X in the 2000s was post-grunge. There's absolutely no way things like the Emo scene, crunk or artists like Avril Lavigne or Britney Spears could be associated with Gen-X.
Alright, clearly you didn't read what I said in my post. I KNOW Generation Xers hated Britney Spears and boy bands and I never said the popular music of the 2000's was targeted towards them. My main point was that Pop Culture exists way outside of the music and that stuff that Generation Xer's liked or could've liked didn't suddenly just disappear into the 2000's.
 

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I mean GenXers were still in their 20s and 30s (oldest being 35) in Y2K, so I guess they atleast have the early 2000s.
 

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Alright, clearly you didn't read what I said in my post. I KNOW Generation Xers hated Britney Spears and boy bands and I never said the popular music of the 2000's was targeted towards them. My main point was that Pop Culture exists way outside of the music and that stuff that Generation Xer's liked or could've liked didn't suddenly just disappear into the 2000's.
Yeah, but that doesn't make the 2000s the "last Gen X decade". People can like any kind of music, regardless of how old they are.
 

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It overlaps, like the 1980s. The early '80s are definitely still pretty Boomery even if the '80s are more Gen X overall. Silent Gen signature decade was the 1950s but they overlap with the mid-later '40s and earlier '60s too. The earlier '60s definitely overlap with younger Silents too of course despite Boomer connections to the mid-later '60s. Gen X signature decade was the 1990s but they have overlap in the mid-later '80s and earlier '00s. Millennials signature decade was the 2010s but they have overlap in the mid-later '00s and will in the earlier '20s. The '00s were more Millennial but overlap with late Gen X in the early parts to an extent. We'll see the same pattern in the 2020s. The 2020s will be more Gen Z but will overlap will late Millennials in the early parts to an extent. It's basically a consistent pattern. Each generation has an "early" decade ('60s, '80s, '00s, '20s) and then it has a signature decade ('70s, '90s, '10s, '30s) then there's a transitional decade which overlaps with the "early" decade of the next generation. It's all really a very consistent pattern if you think about it.
 

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I have GenXer parents, my dad graduated in '86 and my mom graduated in '91, so in their case, no. However Xennials (b. 1977-83) graduated from '95 to '01 and were young adults during thoughout the 00s, so I suppose the 00s is an Xennial decade.
 

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Macho rappers of the early 2000s were more X-like than millennial. Possibly they were performing for Xennials.

Emo/MySpace age (2006-8) was IMHO the first purely millennial period in pop culture.
 

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What I mean by the question above is that does anyone else think the 2000's were the last decade wear Generation X were still a big target for Pop Culture?

I know most people consider the 90's the last Generation X decade and lump them in with the 80's, just like how people always lump in the 60's and 70's together as the Baby Boomer's "time," but I've always thought of it the complete opposite. To me the 70's and 80's were when Baby Boomers were the main target for Pop Culture while the 90's and the 2000's will be seen as the time when Generation X was still the main target for Pop Culture. The Late 90's and very early 2000's were still largely Generation X even with stuff like Britney Spears and boy bands are being popular. Sure the oldest Millennials might have been teenagers or young adults and were old enough to start enjoying and taking over Pop Culture and the oldest Xers were mostly too old for Pop Culture by this point, but that doesn't mean all Generation X culture died out suddenly and Millennials completely took over pop culture.

In fact I see the Early-to-Mid 2000's as the peak era for Generation X culture. Most of the bands, singers, sports athletes, actors, actresses, and comedians that were popular back then were Generation Xers and were the main driving force behind Pop Culture.
people emulate the stuff they grew up with or more specifically, were born into.

I agree that generation Xers were a pop culture target during the 2000s. Gen X were the 70s births who had an affinity for the macabre, and social justice issues. As well, as similiar political problems like surveillance .

During the late 2000s, we got electronic/house and all that late 70s Led Zeppelin-Esque space like music, and we’re now going into this new Gen Y like era. Where Gen Y is the target of the culture. So I think you are right.

Gen X couldn’t have been the target during the 90s, because they were still in their 20s, the oldest would have been at university or just starting adulthood or something.

The Baby Boomers time was the 80s and onward, for example, Michael Jackson and David Bowie, were baby boomers. Alongside, Freddie Mercury.

Lol, anyone who says that Millenials are responsible for the Millenial generation are being ridiculous, it was the 70s space led zeppelin and punk rock sci fi loving 70s kids that made the Emo/PostPunk/Software revolution what it was. People born in that period were just the molding potatoes there for the ride. In fact Gerard Way, Corey Taylor, etc were all Gen Xers.
 
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