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Last time when I was at the hospital, I read a brochure about psychiatry.

It said that the practice of psychiatry tend to differ within different cultures. Factors relating to cultural upbringing, language differences and (maybe) interpersonal ethics are taken into account.

Based on your experiences or case by case observations, how much does psychiatry differ within various cultures? I understand that treatment of depression or disorders also involve counseling.
 

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There is a definite influence. The prospects of overcoming various disorders varies widely depending in the national approach to psychiatry. For instance the prospects for schizophrenics in non western cultures are often better than they are in the west.

Recent studies have shown that the samples used in most psychological studies may have led to incorrect and unwarranted generalisations. Most such studies have been done in the western world, using western subjects. And sometimes what is actually a cultural difference is misinterpreted as being part of someone's psyche.
 

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probably most in nomenclature. in mexico almost everything you get admited for is called coloquially as "nervios" which mean nervousness of course. this can be everything from MDD to schitzophrenia. i can't think of other examples right now but i know there are many.
 

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For instance the prospects for schizophrenics in non western cultures are often better than they are in the west.
And, I think asperger syndrome is not that recognized in non western cultures.

This is because western cultures respect individuality more than eastern. So asperger people are less tolerated in the east.
 

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I believe that it differs greatly. I remember reading Anthropology and the Abnormal in a cultural anthropology class. Ruth Benedict argues that what is considered normal varies greatly from culture to culture, and what is abnormal tends to be pathologized. She extends that line of reasoning to what is considered moral vs. immoral, which is actually one of my biggest frustrations with anthropology. I like to be able to say that something is wrong.

Here's the link, if anyone is interested:

http://dsc.dixie.edu/owl/syllabi/English2010/BenedictEthical Relativism.pdf
 

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Oh, yes. They are currently facing that problem in institutions to help child soldiers in Africa. In the west, we commonly go through and analyze traumatizing events. While in many cultures in Africa, the subjects tell a man of power the happenings of the event one time, and never speak of it again. Interesting, really.
 
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