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MOTM January 2013
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those who have taken the Myers Briggs test/instrument a number of times, perhaps more times than you can remember, have the results changed over time? Do you think this is inevitable and why? How have your results changed? Are they generally the same? Do you spot what the question is alluding to with ease? And be honest, does your knowledge about type affect how you answer the questions? Consciously/unconsciously?

Thanks!
 

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Taking the tests in general create biases, so don't.
 

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Yes, I think so. You know the consequence of each answer, after a time. So your expectation or desired ideal may have an impact. Also, you don't see every question in an universal, common-sense perspective but already in the typology-world vocabulary. My results have always been something with INXX.
 

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Definitely yes - I once wrote out a cheat-sheet for the Keys2Cognition test, marking what questions referred mainly to which function. Even taking into account that some questions refer to multiple functions, you can still use it to pretty accurately manipulate the test to the type you want.

What's more, if you take tests a lot, you may get into a habit of answering questions a certain way even after realizing your answers are less than true about yourself.
 
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Yes, the more you take a test the more you learn how it works, the more you learn how it works the more easily you can persuade the result.
 

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I've done about 3 different MBTI tests, each more than once and got roughly same results across the board - with borderline J/P. The results only differed in extent of preference - especially for thinking/feeling dimension. But that may have reflected my mood at time of test. I don't believe there's any bias - I try to answer honestly even though I may not be 100% satisfied with the results or think that answering a certain way is not representative of my true personality or is misleading in some way.
 

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Yes, because once you know what cognitive function/letter an answer indicates, you can pretty much make the test give you the type you want.
 

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I would say that only the first test could have some accuracy (something like 60%).

The worst dichotomy is the J/P one, because a lot of J mistypes themselves as being P because they are messy.
 

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I think it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, wanting a group to identify with, wanting to belong to something

For example, I demonstrate both Ni/Ne, and both Fi/Fe qualities. I procrastinate and push stuff off but then become incredibly miserable when it weighs back down on me. I am spontaneous, but I do not like "not having a plan," and would prefer it greatly if I did but somehow I consistently do not.

I'm good at being who I am, but I really hate my flaws because they can end up backfiring and making me depressed.
 

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I've done about 3 different MBTI tests, each more than once and got roughly same results across the board - with borderline J/P.
Ditto. When I had to take an assessment for my introductory psychology class, I thought I was an ENTP just because I tested as a 1% preference for Perceiving. It wasn't until a year later when I got more into MBTI and learned about the cognitive functions that I learned I was an ENTJ. Just yesterday I took an online assessment (for shits and giggles) and I tested as an ENTJ ... with a 1% preference for extraversion and a 1% preference for judging. The tests only can lead you so far in discovering your type.

Those tests are definitely manipulable. Once you know how the functions work, you can easily identify which questions are testing particular functions and answer accordingly.
 

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Mhm. You learn which types each question correlates to, and therefore can use bias (consciously and subconsciously) to influence your results.

After realizing this, you try to answer in a non biased way, but ignore the traits you have that are not due to bias.
 

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I always score as NP, when I first took it 2 years ago I scored as a slight extravert, but now I only score as introvert. I scored as INTP, ENTP, INFP and ENFP.
 

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Here's a little recycled reckful on the knowing-the-theory-spoils-the-test issue:

Assuming you're not trying to game the test, and assuming you're motivated by nothing other than a sincere desire to discover your true type (whatever it may be), the fact that you understand something about the theory behind the questions shouldn't interfere with the test's ability to indicate your type. In some cases, in fact, it can improve the test's accuracy, because test items tend to be short and subject to multiple possible interpretations, and someone who has at least some familiarity with the MBTI is more likely to interpret the item in the spirit in which it was intended.

I'd say all four of my MBTI preferences are pretty strong, and when I take an MBTI-related test, I virtually always know which dimension (or function) most, if not all, of the items are intended to tap into. Does that mean I end up getting 100% scores? No, it certainly doesn't. Because I take each item on its own terms and pick the choice that applies best to me. And the fact that I pick the P choice for any particular J/P item might mean it's a poor test item, or it might mean I'm more like a P in that particular respect, or it might mean any number of things. But if the P side of the item applies to me best, and I'm not trying to game the test, and I'm open to all kinds of type input, why the heck would I say, well, I know this is a J/P item, and I think I'm a J, so I'm going to pick the J side?​
 

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MOTM January 2013
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Here's a little recycled reckful on the knowing-the-theory-spoils-the-test issue:

Assuming you're not trying to game the test, and assuming you're motivated by nothing other than a sincere desire to discover your true type (whatever it may be), the fact that you understand something about the theory behind the questions shouldn't interfere with the test's ability to indicate your type. In some cases, in fact, it can improve the test's accuracy, because test items tend to be short and subject to multiple possible interpretations, and someone who has at least some familiarity with the MBTI is more likely to interpret the item in the spirit in which it was intended.

I'd say all four of my MBTI preferences are pretty strong, and when I take an MBTI-related test, I virtually always know which dimension (or function) most, if not all, of the items are intended to tap into. Does that mean I end up getting 100% scores? No, it certainly doesn't. Because I take each item on its own terms and pick the choice that applies best to me. And the fact that I pick the P choice for any particular J/P item might mean it's a poor test item, or it might mean I'm more like a P in that particular respect, or it might mean any number of things. But if the P side of the item applies to me best, and I'm not trying to game the test, and I'm open to all kinds of type input, why the heck would I say, well, I know this is a J/P item, and I think I'm a J, so I'm going to pick the J side?​
This is interesting. It possibly narrows down that the reason for bias might not be knowledge alone but probably coupled with cultural bias especially going by forum trends. It would be difficult otherwise to answer the test in such a way that conflicts with your natural preferences if it was a reliable test although it may be possible for some to bend their perceptions of themselves to fit their 'ideal image' resulting in cognitive dissonance. Another way results could change over time was if they were older and had built up their repertoire of life experience, still the prevailing preference would emerge as the most natural and being confident with. Im sure this certain topic has come up quite a lot though.
 

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I think so. I can't even take the tests anymore because I know what each question is targeting.
That said, the tests aren't often that accurate in the first place. It's a problem of asking multiple choice questions that might be resting on faulty assumptions, and people might be answering one way for a different reason than the test-writer was foreseeing. They might be an interesting way to narrow down options or to find a type to look into, but I don't think you can definitely say something's your type because you test as it.
 
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