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I've never understood that fear most have of dying alone. It's probably in the top 5 reasons for wanting a long term romantic partner. Presumably you want your partner to watch you die.

Frankly I don't want my loved ones watching me gasp on my last breath. When I'm dying, I'd like a little privacy. I doubt my loved ones would enjoy watching anymore than I want them to watch.
 

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I think - the way I interpret it, is not literal, but rather figurative. Never having had that deep connection to another person and never having experienced it
 

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Agreed. I prefer to be alone most of the time. I feel alone, dream alone, love alone, so why not die alone? If I had it my way, I'd paddle out to sea in a small boat with a lethal dose of morphine to die at sea -alone.
 

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They may be afraid of being alone with themselves and realizing something they don't like. I don't care how I die, my only condition is that it must be fast and as painless as possible, I'm not afraid of death, but that doesn't means I also accept slow decay, when the time comes if Fate's choice is a slow death I will help it come faster.
 

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The process of dying is one anyone would likely experience first hand only once in their life. No one who has died can tell you what dying was like afterwards.
Thing is that in general humans rely upon sharing experiences to rationalize and gauge the effect a single experience will have on them, personally, all that in order to cope with their fear about the very same experience. Fear of the unknown as they say.
As such I feel the concept of dying is basically the epitome of scariness (sp?) and no matter what anyone in the anonymity of the internet will tell you about their preferred way to go when their time comes... I am betting you dollars to donuts they WILL ACTUALLY not be brave nor bold nor will they want to be alone in that moment.

Meh. Strikes too close to home. Mum died only 2 years ago from cancer and it was a slow and painful decay but I was there beside her to her final breath.
I like to think that we BOTH were happy about having it had that way...
 
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I've never understood that fear most have of dying alone. It's probably in the top 5 reasons for wanting a long term romantic partner. Presumably you want your partner to watch you die.

Frankly I don't want my loved ones watching me gasp on my last breath. When I'm dying, I'd like a little privacy. I doubt my loved ones would enjoy watching anymore than I want them to watch.
Actually, if you do the research and ask, it's not about dying alone as it is about growing old alone in your 60s, 70s and 80s. Dying for most people is brief (maybe a year or two). Growing old and feeble will take decades.

Consider your current support structure: family, some friends, maybe kids. INFPs usually don't have that many. By the time you reach 70s. Your friends are dying off, busy with grandkids or whatever. Unless you're really good with people, I would guess that most INFP support structures end up disintegrating in the late 60s.

Here's the thing. At 20, your chance of finding a romantic interest is pretty much limitless. At 20, we're not set in our ways, and therefore 2 people can meet and become compatible and grow together. Also at 20, you're young your healthy. You can go skydiving or play video games and have a myriad of ways to distract you from feeling lonely. Video games are much harder to play when your eyesight fades, your reaction time slows and you have arthritis. There's a lot less ways you can to distract yourself when your body stops doing what you want it to do.

In your late 60's, I would imagine finding a romantic interest is much more limited because you are set in your ways and certainly have a lot more baggage. Dying is easy. People die alone all the time. Being alone from 70 to 85 to whenever you die. That's something quite different.

You think you were lonely from say ages 10-25. It's going be 3 times as lonely from from 70-85 if you have no support structure in place.
 

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I gave my cat an opportunity to die in my arms, it seemed to comfort him on his last night (he was crying alone before I grabbed him). I wish he could do the same for me. Even if I do end up dying alone I have a feeling it won't be so bad.
 

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In your late 60's, I would imagine finding a romantic interest is much more limited because you are set in your ways and certainly have a lot more baggage.
Not necessarily. A lot of people become more sociable as they head into old age. I think it's because the insecurities that used to hold them back no longer seem relevant. They have more money, more freedom, and nothing really to worry about other than staying active and healthy. Romance is often not a priority because they replace all that with friends and activity partners. Even so, couples who do find each other later in life seem pretty damn happy together, from what I've seen anyway.

Just sayin'... dying alone is not a rational fear. Anything can happen between now and your deathbed.
 

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I've never understood that fear most have of dying alone. It's probably in the top 5 reasons for wanting a long term romantic partner. Presumably you want your partner to watch you die.

Frankly I don't want my loved ones watching me gasp on my last breath. When I'm dying, I'd like a little privacy. I doubt my loved ones would enjoy watching anymore than I want them to watch.
I agree... For me, and I think for a lot of people who say this, what is actually meant is that one of my biggest fears is living alone (metaphorically, of course).

I think - the way I interpret it, is not literal, but rather figurative. Never having had that deep connection to another person and never having experienced it
I agree that some people will feel that way, and for me it's kinda like that. However, it's not so much never having the experience (as I already have, with platonic relationships), but that I didn't get to share my life with a person who I have that connection with (and also have a physically intimate relationship, not just mentally).
 

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I'm less lonely now in my 50's.

I also have less of a support structure than I did when I was younger, but I
am more secure in myself and am happy in my aloneness.

I have been single for many years and envision being that way until
I die. I don't feel the need for anyone to really caretake me in old
age (anyway, if I get desperate, there's always the retirement
village, to end my days in an SJ way), and at least I won't have to caretake a spouse.

Dying alone doesn't worry me in that sense, but having someone at
My deathbed would be nice.
 

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I'd like to point out, that there is a difference between alone and lonely. You can be alone without being lonely.


I think feeling lonely is kind of the fear, that nobody cares about you. But if you gave your life a meaning, people DO care and miss you when you no longer have a material representation in "this" world. So there is no need to fear dying lonely, if you live your life guided by your heart thus giving your life a meaning.


That you have to take the journey alone is nothing to be afraid of either. In the end, you're alone all the time because you alone are reponsible for your happiness. But there are people, who love you because of who you are. And love keeps being love - even in death.
 
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