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I have a few of these symptoms. Oddly enough, the ones not present in me are present in my brother and vice versa. :shocked:
 

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I definitely have it. I've talked before about how numbers mean nothing to me.

Numbers don't fit into any kind of meaningful framework in my mind.

I'm going to send this article to my friends and family - I didn't know a lot of those things are connected to my problem with numbers.
 

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Try this game on normal, all options checked (default) and tell me your score.

ArithmeTick - How fast can you add and multiply? Solve math problems against the clock!

Note: I'm aware this isn't scientifically accurate. Just curiosity.
If you honestly feel it's a problem though, you should get a real check up on it.
I got 63 points. Most of it was easy: it gave me three questions asking to multiply 11 by something, then ones like 8 divided by 4... Then I got stumped by 13 times 6 with ten seconds on the clock :dry: I've memorized a lot of simple math equations, though, like 8+4=12, so I don't exactly "calculate" like most people. The first problem is posed was something like 7+5 and that took me a good five seconds or so to figure out.

Anyway, yes, I'm pretty convinced I have dyscalculia. Yet I have an easier time with algebra (dyscalculics usually find geometry easier?) and didn't have trouble learning to tell time. I can't calculate time, though. Most of the other symptoms apply, too. When I tried asking teachers about it in high school, they pretty much reacted by telling me "Everyone hates math and you're so smart!"

I doubt it has a correlation with "INFP-ism." No one type has a higher incidence of learning disabilities.
 

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This is me too. I tried to explain to someone that I don't "see" numbers in my head, they sort of vanish like I can't remember them...they didn't get it (ISTJ with maths degree).

I've always felt "thick" in spite of feeling very bright in some areas and doing really well academically (once maths were out of the curriculum, thanks) because I struggle with every day things like calculating time, discount percentages etc.
 

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Sure I do. I'm so bad with numbers and I hate them so much.
It's just that I don't envy ISTJ minds. Numbers are shit, to me they mean nothing, they're just...I mean, numbers freed no one T.T.
I didn't pass High School maths, just saying. xD.
Numbers are meaningless, boys.
 

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I don't have this problem at all. But I've got a high percentage of T, so I dunno, maybe that's it? I still don't like math, even though I have a natural knack for it.

Or maybe it has no correlation at all, I don't know.
 

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Well a large portion of INFPs are writers, and I've read that exceptionally good writers tend to be bad at math. I guess the two require different strengths and different ways of thinking so that very well developed skills in one discipline might come at the cost of even mediocre skills in the other. So there could be some connection. I hope that makes sense :unsure: I should probably go to bed (yay for staying up late even when you're tired!)

Anyway, I do have some symptoms of dyscalculia, so I could have a mild form. Thanks for the link.
 
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I scored 261, but then again, I've never had a real problem with this kind of math. The only hassle was multiplication, 16x16, then I have to chop it into pieces, since 16x16 is 'algebra' (pun intended) to me :p(took me like 8 seconds to figure it out). Especially not when I'm allowed to do it in my head, my main problem lies on remembering the rules of more advanced math, when to do this, how to do that. And of course, how to write it down correctly.

This being a good example: ax^2 + bx + c = 0. Which you are supposed to solve via this formula (which I always forgot how to use)



Every time I sat down for class, I had to 'relearn' all the stuff just to be able to solve the math. I just CANNOT for the life of me remember >.<

I usually cheated a lot (by going through it in my head), which lead to a lot of headache for my teacher.

I would just answer with x=this or that. Without explaining how I reached the conclusion.

I simply can't write something down while I'm processing it, and I lose the memory of how I reached that conclusion after finishing it.

Which lead to me doing some kind of compromise, I sort it out in pieces and hack it up in a order, doing part A, writing down how I did part A, then on to part B. That way the teacher at least got some sort of idea how I solve the math.
 
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I think I have dyscalculia, but I don't know for sure. I was curious if this correlated with INFP - ness because some other learning disabilities (ADD, ADHD) seem to have some correlation.

If you don't know what it is:

Dyscalculia: Dyslexia's Lesser-Known Sibling
I have math issues for sure. In high school, I tried to get the guidance counselor to diagnose me with a math learning disability but he said that since I was getting B's in math, I didn't have a learning disability. I cried and told him that he doesn't understand how much TIME and effort I put into getting those grades. I had a tutor and it took me literally hours to do a one page homework assignment. I only got good grades because I worked my ass off and had a tutor. But he wasn't convinced. Anyway, I had to take algebra SIX TIMES. That is SIX years of my educational life learning the same damn thing because I never could get a good enough score/grade to move on to the next level. The crappiest part of all was I ACED geometry. In the state math test, I score in the 96th percentile for GEOMETRY. But of course, with our backwards ass educational system, you don't get rewarded for being good at something. It simply meant I never had to take another geometry class again because I was already good enough! So yeah, you're good at geometry and suck at algebra? Well then, we'll force you (punish you) into taking algebra until you're "good enough" instead of seeing how far (encouraging your strengths) you can take your geometry skills. SO BACKWARDS. So yeah, you may be looking at (figuratively) a geometry genius but no one would ever know because I wasn't encouraged to pursue it, instead they had to beat a dead horse and shove stupid algebra down my throat for SIX YEARS. :angry:
 

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I got a 128. What does that mean? It was the double digit questions that got me.
There's a few toughies in there that will cause problems for most people. So it's nice to do it a few times to get a general average.

With no scientific backing in my claims, I'd say most people want to be around +80.
People between 50-70 is is a little concerning, but nothing over the top. -- I can see these people getting slowed down by double digits and that's somewhat expected.
People with a high school education, but lower than 50 I'd be concerned about.

I did study a bit about Dyscalculia in University, but didn't pay too much attention to it. It seems like there's so many variations to it that you may have it, but still do reasonably well on the above test. If people think it's cause for concern, I'd get professionally tested though. Well, I guess that's harder if you don't have health care though.

I'll read into this all a bit more, I don't like the cloudy memory. So thanks for posting about it, OP.
 

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Nope, while I am very poor at math I do not fit those symptoms.

That being said I do have dysgraphia, so I share your pain when it comes to suffering from obscure relatives of dyslexia.
 
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